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Kelly, Scott Joseph
Kelly Scott
Kelly Scott
Credit: www.spacefacts.de
American test pilot astronaut 1996-2016. Twin brother of astronaut Mark Kelly. 520 cumulative days in space.

Status: Inactive; Active 1996-2016. Born: 1964-02-21. Spaceflights: 4 . Total time in space: 520.44 days. Birth Place: Orange, New Jersey.

Educated SUNY-Maritime; Tennessee-Knoxville; Patuxent.

Official NASA Biography as of June 2016:Scott J. Kelly (CAPTAIN, USN, RET.)
NASA Astronaut

PERSONAL DATA: Born February 21, 1964 in Orange, New Jersey. He has two children.

EDUCATION: Graduated from Mountain High School, West Orange, New Jersey, in 1982; received a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering from the State University of New York Maritime College in 1987 and a Master of Science degree in Aviation Systems from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, in 1996.

ORGANIZATIONS: Associate Fellow, Society of Experimental Test Pilots; Member, Association of Space Explorers

SPECIAL HONORS: Two Defense Superior Service Medals, Legion of Merit, Distinguished Flying Cross, Navy Commendation Medal, Navy Achievement Medal, two Navy Unit Commendations, National Defense Service Medal, Southwest Asia Service Medal, Kuwait Liberation Medal, Sea Service Deployment Ribbon, NASA Distinguished Service Medal, NASA Exceptional Service Medal, NASA Outstanding Leadership Medal, three NASA Space Flight Medals, Russian Federation Medal for merit in Space Exploration. Korolev Diploma from the Federation Aeronautique Internationale, 1999. Honorary Doctorate of Science degree from the State University of New York, 2008.

EXPERIENCE: Kelly received his commission from the State University of New York Maritime College in May 1987 and was designated a naval aviator in July 1989 at Naval Air Station (NAS) in Beeville, Texas. He then reported to Fighter Squadron 101 at NAS Oceana, Virginia Beach, Virginia, for initial F-14 Tomcat training. Upon completion of this training, he was assigned to Fighter Squadron 143 and made overseas deployments to the North Atlantic, Mediterranean Sea, Red Sea and Persian Gulf aboard the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69). Kelly was selected to attend the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School in January 1993 and completed training in June 1994. After graduation, he worked as a test pilot at the Strike Aircraft Test Squadron, Naval Air Warfare Center, Aircraft Division, Patuxent River, Maryland, flying the F-14 Tomcat and F/A-18 Hornet. Kelly was the first pilot to fly an F-14 with an experimental digital flight control system installed and performed subsequent high angle of attack and departure testing. He has logged over 8,000 hours in more than 40 different aircraft and spacecraft and has over 250 carrier landings. Kelly holds a United States Coast Guard Third Mate's license. Kelly retired from the U.S. Navy in June of 2012.

NASA EXPERIENCE: Selected by NASA in April 1996, Kelly reported to the Johnson Space Center in August 1996. Following completion of training, he was assigned technical duties in the Astronaut Office Spacecraft Systems/Operations branch. A veteran of three space flights, Kelly has logged more than 180 days in space. He served as pilot on STS-103 in 1999 and was the Mission Commander on STS-118 in 2007. Following STS-103, Kelly served as NASA's Director of Operations in Star City, Russia. He served as a backup crewmember for ISS Expedition 5 and as the Astronaut Office Space Station Branch Chief. Kelly also served as a Flight Engineer for ISS Expedition 25 and as the Commander of ISS Expedition 26. Following his mission he served at the International Space Station Operations Branch Chief within the Astronaut Office and other technical roles.

Kelly and cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko have been selected to serve a one-year mission aboard the International Space Station launching in March 2015 and will be onboard during increments 43 to 46. The goal of the mission is to understand how the human body reacts and adapts to the harsh environment of space. Data from the expedition will be used to reduce risks to the health of crewmembers as NASA prepares to advance space travel beyond low Earth orbit. Kelly will be a Flight Engineer for increments 43 and 44 and the International Space Station Commander for increments 45 and 46.

SPACE FLIGHT EXPERIENCE: STS-103 (December 19 to December 27, 1999) was an 8-day mission, during which the crew successfully installed new instruments and upgraded systems on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Enhancing HST scientific capabilities required three spacewalks (EVAs). The STS-103 mission was accomplished in 120 Earth orbits, traveling 3.2 million miles in 191 hours and 11 minutes.

STS-118 (August 8 to August 21, 2007) was the 119th space shuttle flight, the 22nd flight to the International Space Station (ISS), and the 20th flight for Endeavour. During the mission, Endeavour's crew successfully added another truss segment, a new gyroscope and an external spare parts platform to the ISS. A new system that enables docked shuttles to draw electrical power from the station to extend visits to the outpost was successfully activated. A total of four EVAs were performed by three crewmembers. Endeavour carried approximately 5,000 pounds of equipment and supplies to the station and returned to Earth with approximately 4,000 pounds of hardware and equipment. Traveling 5.3 million miles in space, the STS-118 mission was completed in 12 days, 17 hours, 55 minutes and 34 seconds.

On October 7, 2010, Kelly launched aboard the Soyuz TMA-M spacecraft to serve a tour of duty on the ISS. He assumed command of Expedition 26 once the Soyuz TMA-19 undocked on November 24, 2010. After a 159 day stay aboard the ISS, Commander Kelly and Russian Flight Engineers Alexander Kaleri and Oleg Skripochka safely landed their Soyuz spacecraft on the Kazakhstan Steppe on March 16, 2011.

SOCIAL MEDIA: Twitter: https://twitter.com/StationCDRKelly

JANUARY 2014


NASA Official Biography

NAME: Scott J. Kelly (Lieutenant, USN)
NASA Astronaut Candidate (Pilot)

PERSONAL DATA:
Born February 21, 1964 in Orange, New Jersey. Married to the former Leslie S. Yandell of Atlanta, Georgia. They have one child. Enjoys running, weightlifting, racquetball, and various water sports.

EDUCATION:
Graduated from Mountain High School, West Orange, New Jersey, in 1982; received a bachelor of science degree in electrical engineering from the State University of New York Maritime College in 1987, and a master of science degree in aviation systems from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, in 1996.

ORGANIZATIONS:
Member, Society of Experimental Test Pilots.

AWARDS:
Navy Commendation Medal,Navy Achievement Medal, 2 Navy Unit Commendations, National Defense Service Medal, Southwest Asia Service Medal, Defense of Kuwait Medal, Sea Service Deployment Ribbon.

EXPERIENCE:
Kelly received his commission from the State University of New York Maritime College in May 1987, and was designated a naval aviator in July 1989 at Naval Air Station (NAS) Beeville, Texas. He then reported to Fighter Squadron 101 at NAS Oceana, Virginia Beach, Virginia, for initial F-14 Tomcat training. Upon completion of this training, he was assigned to Fighter Squadron 143 and made overseas deployments to the North Atlantic, Mediterranean Sea, Red Sea and Persian Gulf aboard the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69). Kelly was selected to attend the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School in January 1993 and completed training in June 1994. After graduation, he worked as a test pilot at the Strike Aircraft Test Squadron, Naval Air Warfare Center, Aircraft Division, Patuxent River, Maryland, flying the F-14A/B/D, F/A-18A/B/C/D and KC-130F. Kelly was the first pilot to fly an F-14 with an experimental digital flight control system installed and performed subsequent high angle of attack and departure testing.

Kelly has logged over 1,800 flight hours in more than 30 different aircraft and has over 250 carrier landings.

NASA EXPERIENCE:
Selected as an astronaut candidate by NASA in April 1996, Kelly reported to the Johnson Space Center in August 1996 to begin two years of training and evaluation. Successful completion of initial training will qualify him for various technical assignments leading to selection as a pilot on a Space Shuttle flight crew.

JANUARY 1997


More at: Kelly, Scott.

Family: Astronaut, NASA Group 16 - 1996. Country: USA. Spacecraft: ISS. Flights: STS-103, STS-111 ISS EO-5, STS-118. Projects: STS. Agency: USN. Bibliography: 12, 5604.

1964 February 21 - .
  • Birth of Scott Joseph Kelly - . Nation: USA. Related Persons: Kelly, Scott. American test pilot astronaut. Flew on STS-103, STS-118. Twin brother of astronaut Mark Kelly..

1983 December 5 - .
  • NASA Astronaut Training Group 16 selected. - . Nation: USA. Related Persons: Brown, David, Burbank, Cagle, Caldeiro, Camarda, Carey, Clark, Fincke, Forrester, Frick, Guidoni, Herrington, Higginbotham, Hobaugh, Kelly, James, Kelly, Mark, Kelly, Scott, Lockhart, Loria, Magnus, Massimino, Mastracchio, McCool, Morin, Nowak, Pettit, Phillips.

    The group was selected to provide pilot, engineer, and scientist astronauts for space shuttle flights.. Qualifications: Pilots: Bachelor's degree in engineering, biological science, physical science or mathematics. Advanced degree desirable. At least 1,000 flight-hours of pilot-in-command time. Flight test experience desirable. Excellent health. Vision minimum 20/50 uncorrected, correctable to 20/20 vision; maximum sitting blood pressure 140/90. Height between 163 and 193 cm.

    Mission Specialists: Bachelor's degree in engineering, biological science, physical science or mathematics and minimum three years of related experience or an advanced degree. Vision minimum 20/150 uncorrected, correctable to 20/20. Maximum sitting blood pressure of 140/90. Height between 150 and 193 cm.. 10 pilots and 25 mission specialists selected from over 2,400 applicants. 9 additional international astronauts.


1999 December 19 - .
1999 December 20 - .
  • STS-103 Mission Status Report #03 - . Nation: USA. Related Persons: Brown, Clervoy, Foale, Kelly, James, Kelly, Mark, Kelly, Scott. Program: STS. Flight: STS-103.

    The seven members of the STS-103 crew of Discovery completed a day of preparation Monday for a Tuesday capture of the Hubble Space Telescope. During three days of space walks, Hubble's capability to conduct astronomical observations will be restored and some of its equipment upgraded. Additional Details: here....


1999 December 20 - .
  • STS-103 Mission Status Report #02 - . Nation: USA. Related Persons: Brown, Clervoy, Foale, Grunsfeld, Kelly, Scott, Nicollier, Smith, Steven. Program: STS. Flight: STS-103.

    Trailing the Hubble Space Telescope by about 3,700 nautical miles and closing, the seven Discovery astronauts were awakened at 9:50 a.m. CST today to the sounds of Bachman-Turner Overdrive's "Taking Care of Business." The wake-up call from Mission Control began the crew's first full day in orbit. Discovery is closing on the telescope at a rate of about 340 nautical miles with each hour and a half long orbit of Earth. Additional Details: here....


1999 December 20 - . 00:50 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC39B. Launch Platform: MLP2. LV Family: Shuttle. Launch Vehicle: Space Shuttle.
  • STS-103 - . Call Sign: Discovery. Crew: Brown, Clervoy, Foale, Grunsfeld, Kelly, Scott, Nicollier, Smith, Steven. Payload: Discovery F27. Mass: 116,884 kg (257,685 lb). Nation: USA. Related Persons: Brown, Clervoy, Foale, Grunsfeld, Kelly, Scott, Nicollier, Smith, Steven. Agency: NASA Houston. Manufacturer: North American. Program: STS. Class: Manned. Type: Manned spaceplane. Flight: STS-103. Spacecraft Bus: Shuttle. Spacecraft: Discovery. Duration: 7.97 days. Decay Date: 1999-12-28 . USAF Sat Cat: 25996 . COSPAR: 1999-069A. Apogee: 609 km (378 mi). Perigee: 563 km (349 mi). Inclination: 28.5000 deg. Period: 96.40 min.

    Hubble Space Telescope (HST) servicing mission SM-3A, delayed repeatedly by technical problems with the shuttle fleet after the near-disastrous previous launch. Finally launched after the last possible day to avoid Y2K computer problems; one spacewalk was cancelled so that the shuttle could return by December 28. Hubble was in a 591 km x 610 km x 28.5 deg orbit at launch. After separation of the external tank ET-101 the Orbiter was in a 56 km x 587 km x 28.5 deg transfer orbit. The OMS 2 burn at 0134 UTC raised the orbit to 313 km x 582 km. The payload bay contained:

    • Bay 1-2: External airlock/ODS
    • Bay 7-8: ORU Carrier (Spacelab pallet). Carried Hubble replacement spares arranged as follows: COPE protective enclosure with three RSU gyros, a new solid state recorder, and an S-band transmitter; LOPE enclosure with an HST-486 computer and voltage improvement kit; ASIPE enclosure with a spare HST-486 and spare RSU; FSIPE enclosure with a replacement FGS-2 fine guidance sensor; and NPE enclosure with New Outer Blanket Layer insulation.
    • Bay 11: Flight Servicing System (FSS). Contained the BAPS (Berthing and Positioning System) used to dock with the aft end of the Hubble Space Telescope.
    • Bay 8: APC carrier with foot restraint
    • Bay 12: APC carrier with HST foot retstraint

    Hubble was grabbed by the shuttle's robot arm at 0034 UTC on December 22. Following completion of repairs HST was released on December 25 at 2303 UTC. The deorbit burn at 2248 UTC on Dec 27 placed the orbiter in a 50 km x 616 km descent orbit. Discovery landed on runway 33 at Kennedy Space Center at 0001 UTC on December 28.

1999 December 21 - .
  • STS-103 Mission Status Report #04 - . Nation: USA. Related Persons: Brown, Clervoy, Kelly, Scott, Smith, Steven. Program: STS. Flight: STS-103.

    Discovery is on track for its rendezvous with the Hubble Space Telescope this afternoon, culminating in the planned capture of the 12.5-ton observatory at 6:41 p.m. CST. In recognition of today's activities, the seven astronauts aboard Discovery were awakened at 9:20 a.m. today to the song "Rendezvous" by Bruce Springsteen. Additional Details: here....


1999 December 26 - .
  • STS-103 Mission Status Report #15 - . Nation: USA. Related Persons: Brown, Kelly, Scott, Ross. Program: STS. Flight: STS-103. Following the successful deployment of the Hubble Space Telescope yesterday, the seven man crew aboard Space Shuttle Discovery turned its attention today to preparing for the return to Kennedy Space Center late tomorrow afternoon.. Additional Details: here....

1999 December 26 - .
  • STS-103 Mission Status Report #14 - . Nation: USA. Related Persons: Brown, Kelly, James, Kelly, Mark, Kelly, Scott. Program: STS. Flight: STS-103. With their primary mission objectives successfully completed, Discovery's astronauts today begin preparing their spacecraft for its scheduled return to Earth Monday, checking out the flight control system and reaction control jets that support re-entry.. Additional Details: here....

1999 December 27 - .
1999 December 28 - .
2007 August 8 - . 22:36 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC39A. LV Family: Shuttle. Launch Vehicle: Space Shuttle.
  • STS-118 - . Call Sign: Endeavour. Crew: Caldwell, Drew, Hobaugh, Kelly, Scott, Mastracchio, Morgan, Williams, Dave. Payload: Endeavour F20 / S5, Spacehab. Mass: 121,823 kg (268,573 lb). Nation: USA. Related Persons: Caldwell, Drew, Hobaugh, Kelly, Scott, Mastracchio, Morgan, Williams, Dave. Agency: NASA. Program: ISS. Class: Manned. Type: Manned spaceplane. Flight: Soyuz TMA-10, STS-117 ISS EO-15, STS-118. Spacecraft Bus: Shuttle. Spacecraft: Endeavour. Duration: 12.75 days. Decay Date: 2007-08-21 . USAF Sat Cat: 32008 . COSPAR: 2007-035A. Apogee: 348 km (216 mi). Perigee: 337 km (209 mi). Inclination: 51.6000 deg. Period: 91.40 min.

    Space Shuttle Endeavour was launched on Aug 8 at 2236 UTC. The STS-118 stack comprised Orbiter OV-105, solid rockets RSRM-97 and external tank ET-117. The solid boosters separated 2 min after launch. At 2245 UTC the orbiter main engines cut off and ET-117 separated into an approximately 57 x 225 km x 51.6 deg orbit. The OMS-2 burn at 2313 UTC put Endeavour in a higher 229 x 317 km orbit as the ET fell back to reentry around 2346 UTC.

    During ascent a large chunk of external tank foam was observed to hit the underside of the orbiter. Examination in orbit using the robotic arm showed a hole in a heat shield tile that went down to the felt mounting pad. There was considerable press discussion of the danger, but as the mission drew to a close NASA decided that no lasting damage would be incurred during reentry to the orbiter structure, and called off a potential extra spacewalk to repair the tile.

    Endeavour docked at the PMA-2 adapter on the Station at 18:02 GMT on 10 August; the hatches were opened at 20:04.

    The 14036 kg of cargo broke down as follows:

    • Bay 1-2: Orbiter Docking System, 1800 kg
    • Bay 1-2: EMU 3010, 130 kg
    • Bay 1-2: EMU 3017, 130 kg
    • Bay 3: Tunnel Adapter, 112 kg
    • Bay 5-7: Spacehab-SM Single Module, 5480 kg: Loaded with research experimental equipment and consumables to be left at the station.
    • Bay 8P: SPDU: Station Power Distribution Unit, will be left at the ISS and allow the Orbiter to draw electricity from the station while docked, allowing longer missions
    • Bay 8-10: S5 Truss, 1584 kg: a short spacer truss installed at the end of the ISS S4 truss during the mission, to eliminate interference with the S6 solar panels when they would be added later
    • Bay 11-12: ESP-3, 3400 kg: External Stowage Platform 3, left at the ISS, provided external storage for spare parts, and was delivered with a spare nitrogen tank for the truss cooling system, a spare truss battery charge/discharge unit (BCDU), a spare Canadarm-2 robot arm pitch roll joint, and a replacement Control Moment Gyro for the Z1 truss
    • Bay 11-12: CMG-3R ORU, 540 kg
    • Sill: OBSS, 450 kg
    • Sill: RMS 201, 410 kg
    The shuttle's RMS 201 robotic arm moved the S5 truss from the payload bay at 20:50 on 10 August. It was handed over to the station's Canadarm-2 robotic arm, which then attached it to the S4 truss at 17:30 on 11 August, with astronauts assisting on the first of four spacewalks of the mission. On 14 August, ESP-3 was unberthed from Endeavour's payload bay and attached to the P3 truss on the Station, where its spare parts can be reached if needed.

    Following successful completion of all cargo delivery and station assembly tasks, the crew returned to Endeavour on 18 August, undocking the next day at 11:56 GMT. Landing was moved up a day ahead of schedule because of concern a hurricane might force evacuation of the Houston Control Center on the originally-planned return date. Endeavour began its deorbit burn at 15:25 GMT on August 21 and lowered its orbit from 336 x 347 km to -28 x 342 km. It landed on runway 15 at Kennedy Space Center at 16:32 GMT. Landing mass was 100,878 kg.


2007 August 21 - . 16:32 GMT - .
2010 April 2 - . 04:04 GMT - . Launch Site: Baikonur. Launch Complex: Baikonur LC1. LV Family: R-7. Launch Vehicle: Soyuz-FG.
  • Soyuz TMA-18 - . Call Sign: Cliff. Crew: Caldwell, Korniyenko, Skvortsov, Aleksandr. Backup Crew: Borisenko, Andrei, Kelly, Scott, Samokutyayev. Payload: Soyuz 7K-STMA s/n 228. Mass: 7,200 kg (15,800 lb). Nation: Russia. Agency: RKA. Program: ISS. Class: Manned. Type: Manned spacecraft. Flight: Soyuz TMA-18. Spacecraft Bus: Soyuz. Spacecraft: Soyuz TMA. Duration: 176.05 days. Decay Date: 2010-04-20 . USAF Sat Cat: 36505 . COSPAR: 2010-011A. Apogee: 361 km (224 mi). Perigee: 350 km (210 mi). Inclination: 51.6000 deg. Period: 91.60 min.

    ISS EO-23. The crew first attempted to depart the ISS on 24 September. However the latches between the Soyuz and the station failed to release. Return to earth the next day was successful, with undocking at 02:03 GMT; deorbit burn at 04:31 GMT; and landing in Kazakhstan at 05:23 GMT.


2010 October 7 - . 23:10 GMT - . Launch Site: Baikonur. Launch Complex: Baikonur LC1. LV Family: R-7. Launch Vehicle: Soyuz-FG.
  • Soyuz TMA-01M - . Call Sign: Ingul. Crew: Kaleri, Kelly, Scott, Skripochka. Backup Crew: Garan, Kononenko, Volkov, Sergey. Payload: Soyuz TMA s/n 701. Mass: 7,200 kg (15,800 lb). Nation: Russia. Agency: RKA. Program: ISS. Class: Manned. Type: Manned spacecraft. Flight: Soyuz TMA-01M. Spacecraft Bus: Soyuz. Spacecraft: Soyuz TMA. Duration: 159.78 days. Decay Date: 2011-03-16 . USAF Sat Cat: 37183 . COSPAR: 2010-052A. Apogee: 355 km (220 mi). Perigee: 350 km (210 mi). Inclination: 51.6000 deg. Period: 91.60 min. ISS EO-25 crew. The Soyuz docked at the Poisk module of the ISS at 00:01 GMT on 10 October. The crew entered the spacecraft and undocked at 04:27 GMT on 16 March 2011. Following retrofire and re-entry they landed safely in Kazakhstan at 07:53 GMT..

2014 September 25 - . 20:25 GMT - . Launch Site: Baikonur. Launch Complex: Baikonur LC1. LV Family: R-7. Launch Vehicle: Soyuz-FG.
  • Soyuz TMA-14M - . Call Sign: Tarkhany. Crew: Samokutyayev, Serova, Wilmore. Backup Crew: Kelly, Scott, Korniyenko, Padalka. Payload: Soyuz TMA s/n 714. Mass: 7,200 kg (15,800 lb). Nation: Russia. Program: ISS. Class: Manned. Type: Manned spacecraft. Flight: Soyuz TMA-14M. Spacecraft Bus: Soyuz. Spacecraft: Soyuz TMA. Duration: 167.24 days. Decay Date: 2015-03-12 . USAF Sat Cat: 40246 . COSPAR: 2014-057A. Apogee: 408 km (253 mi). Perigee: 396 km (246 mi). Inclination: 51.6500 deg. Period: 92.60 min.

    Expedition 42 crew transported to the ISS (Samokutyaev, Wilmore and Serova). The port solar array failed to deploy after Soyuz separated from the launch vehicle third stage, but this did not impact the rendezvous. Soyuz TMA-14M docked with the Poisk module of the ISS at 02:11 GMT on September 26. Serova was the fourth Russian woman in space but the first since 1997. On March 11 2015 at 22:44 GMT Soyuz TMA-14M undocked from the Poisk module with the same crew aboard. It performed its deorbit burn at 01:16 GMT March 12 and landed in Kazakhstan at around 02:08 GMT.


2015 March 27 - . 19:42 GMT - . Launch Site: Baikonur. Launch Complex: Baikonur LC1. LV Family: R-7. Launch Vehicle: Soyuz-FG.
  • Soyuz TMA-16M - . Call Sign: Altair. Crew: Kelly, Scott, Korniyenko, Padalka. Backup Crew: Ovchinin, Volkov, Sergey, Williams, Jeffrey. Return Crew: Aimbetov, Mogensen, Padalka. Payload: Soyuz TMA s/n 716. Mass: 7,200 kg (15,800 lb). Nation: Russia. Program: ISS. Class: Manned. Type: Manned spacecraft. Flight: Soyuz TMA-16M. Spacecraft Bus: Soyuz. Spacecraft: Soyuz TMA. Duration: 168.21 days. Decay Date: 2015-04-05 . USAF Sat Cat: 40540 . COSPAR: 2015-016A. Apogee: 213 km (132 mi). Perigee: 198 km (123 mi). Inclination: 51.6000 deg.

    Docked with the Poisk module of the ISS at 5 hours 50 minutes after launch. Padalka was the commander, and Kelly and Kornienko were part of a long-duration crew that would spend nearly a year aboard the space station. On 28 August Padalka, Kelly and Kornienko flew Soyuz TMA-16M from the Poisk to Zvezda docking ports. Undocking from Poisk was at 07:12 GMT and docking with Zvezda was at 07:30 GMT. This freed the Poisk port for the TMA-18M arrival, and freed Zvezda for a refuelling spacecraft once TMA-16M returned to Earth. ISS EO- 44 concluded when Soyuz TMA-16M undocked from the Zvezda aft port at 21:29 GMT on 11 September, carrying Expedition 44 commander Padalka and EP-18 visiting crew members Mogensen and Aimbetov. Soyuz TMA-16M landed in Kazakhstan at 00:51:36 GMT on 12 September.


2015 September 2 - . 04:37 GMT - . Launch Site: Baikonur. Launch Complex: Baikonur LC1. LV Family: R-7. Launch Vehicle: Soyuz-FG.
  • Soyuz TMA-18M - . Call Sign: Eridanus. Crew: Aimbetov, Mogensen, Volkov, Sergey. Backup Crew: Skripochka, Pesquet, Prokopyev. Return Crew: Volkov, Sergey, Kelly, Scott, Korniyenko. Payload: Soyuz TMA s/n 718. Mass: 7,200 kg (15,800 lb). Nation: Russia. Program: ISS. Class: Manned. Type: Manned spacecraft. Flight: Soyuz TMA-18M. Spacecraft Bus: Soyuz. Spacecraft: Soyuz TMA. Duration: 181.99 days. Decay Date: 2016-03-02 04:25:00 . USAF Sat Cat: 40885 . COSPAR: 2015-043A. Apogee: 406 km (252 mi). Perigee: 398 km (247 mi). Inclination: 51.6500 deg. Period: 92.60 min.

    Docked with ISS at the Poisk port at 07:39 GMT on 4 September. On Mar 2 at 0102 UTC Volkov, Kornienko and Kelly, aboard Soyuz TMA-18M, undocked from the Poisk module, concluding Expedition 46. Tim Kopra then became commander of Expedition 47, with flight engineers Yuriy Malenchenko and Tim Peake. Soyuz TMA-18M made the deorbit burn at 0332 UTC and landed in Kazakhstan at 0426 UTC. Soyuz commander Volkov had spent six months in space, while Kornienko and Kelly completed 340d 8h 21min in space, or about 0.93 years.



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