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Herrington, John Bennett
Herrington
Herrington
Credit: www.spacefacts.de
American test pilot mission specialist astronaut 1996-2005.

Status: Inactive; Active 1996-2005. Born: 1958-09-14. Spaceflights: 1 . Total time in space: 13.78 days. Birth Place: Wetumka, Oklahoma.

Grew up in Colorado Springs, Colorado, Riverton, Wyoming, and Plano, Texas. Educated Colorado-Colorado Springs; Patuxent. US Navy test pilot.

Official NASA Biography as of June 2016:John Bennett Herrington (Commander, USN, Ret.)
NASA Astronaut (Former)

PERSONAL DATA: Born September 14, 1958 in Wetumka, Oklahoma. He grew up in Colorado Springs, Colorado, Riverton, Wyoming, and Plano, Texas. He has two children. He enjoys rock climbing, snow skiing, running, cycling. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. James E. Herrington, reside in Spicewood, Texas. His brother, James E. Herrington, Jr., resides in Sandy Spring, Maryland. His sister, Jennifer D. Monshaugen, resides in Spicewood, Texas.

EDUCATION: Graduated from Plano Senior High School, Plano, Texas, in 1976; received a bachelor of science degree in applied mathematics from the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, in 1983, and a master of science degree in aeronautical engineering from the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School in 1995.

ORGANIZATIONS: Life member of the Association of Naval Aviation, University of Colorado at Colorado Springs Alumni Association. Sequoyah Fellow, American Indian Science and Engineering Society.

SPECIAL HONORS: Distinguished Naval Graduate from Aviation Officer Candidate School, Pensacola, Florida, in 1984. Awarded Navy Commendation Medal, Navy Meritorious Unit Commendation, Coast Guard Meritorious Unit Commendation, Coast Guard Special Operations Service Ribbon, National Defense Medal, Sea Service Deployment Ribbons (3), and various other service awards.

EXPERIENCE: Herrington received his commission from Aviation Officer Candidate School in March 1984 and was designated a Naval Aviator in March 1985. He reported to Patrol Squadron Thirty-One (VP-31) at the Moffett Field Naval Air Station, Mountain View, California for initial training in the P-3C Orion. His first operational assignment was with Patrol Squadron Forty-Eight (VP-48) where he made three operational deployments, two to the Northern Pacific based from Naval Air Station Adak, Alaska and one to the Western Pacific based from the Naval Air Station Cubi Point, Republic of the Philippines. While assigned to VP-48, Herrington was designated a Patrol Plane Commander, Mission Commander, and Patrol Plane Instructor Pilot. Following completion of his first operational tour, Herrington then returned to VP-31 as a Fleet Replacement Squadron Instructor Pilot. While assigned to VP-31 he was selected to attend the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School in Patuxent River, Maryland in January 1990. After graduation in December, 1990, he reported to the Force Warfare Aircraft Test Directorate as a project test pilot for the Joint Primary Aircraft Training System. Herrington conducted additional flight test assignments flying numerous variants of the P-3 Orion as well as the T-34C and the DeHavilland Dash 7. Following his selection as an Aeronautical Engineering Duty Officer, Herrington reported to the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School where he completed a master of science degree in aeronautical engineering in June 1995. Herrington was assigned as a special projects officer to the Bureau of Naval Personnel Sea Duty Component when selected for the astronaut program.

He has logged over 3,800 flight hours in over 30 different types of aircraft.

NASA EXPERIENCE: Selected by NASA in April 1996, Herrington reported to the Johnson Space Center in August 1996. He completed two years of training and evaluation, and is qualified for flight assignment as a mission specialist. Herrington was assigned to the Flight Support Branch of the Astronaut Office where he served as a member of the Astronaut Support Personnel team responsible for Shuttle launch preparations and post-landing operations. He flew on STS-113 logging over 330 hours in space, including 3 EVAs totaling 19 hours and 55 minutes. Herrington retired from the Navy and NASA in July 2005 and currently works for Rocketplane Limited.

SPACE FLIGHT EXPERIENCE: STS-113 Endeavour (November 23-Dec 7, 2002) was the sixteenth Shuttle mission to visit the International Space Station. Mission accomplishments included the delivery of the Expedition-Six crew, the delivery, installation and activation of the P1 Truss, and the transfer of cargo from Shuttle to the Station. During the mission Herrington performed three EVAs totaling 19 hours and 55 minutes. STS-113 brought home the Expedition-Five crew from their 6-month stay aboard the Station. Mission duration 13 days, 18 hours and 47 minutes.

AUGUST 2005


NASA Official Biography

NAME: John Bennett Herrington (Lieutenant Commander, USN)
NASA Astronaut Candidate (Mission Specialist)

PERSONAL DATA:
Born September 14, 1958 in Wetumka, Oklahoma. He grew up in Colorado Springs, Colorado, Riverton, Wyoming, and Plano, Texas. Married to the former Debra Ann Farmer of Colorado Springs, Colorado. They have two children. He enjoys rock climbing, snow skiing, running, cycling. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. James E. Herrington, reside in Spicewood, Texas. His brother, James E. Herrington, Jr., resides in Fort Collins, Colorado. His sister, Jennifer D. Monshaugen, resides in Austin, Texas. Her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Donald Farmer reside in Colorado Springs, Colorado.

EDUCATION:
Graduated from Plano Senior High School, Plano, Texas, in 1976; received a bachelor of science degree in applied mathematics from the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, in 1983, and a master of science degree in aeronautical engineering from the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School in 1995.

ORGANIZATIONS:
Life member of the Association of Naval Aviation, University of Colorado at Colorado Springs Alumni Association.

SPECIAL HONORS:
Distinguished Naval Graduate from Aviation Officer Candidate School, Pensacola, Florida, in 1984. Awarded Navy Commendation Medal, Navy Meritorious Unit Commendation, Coast Guard Meritorious Unit Commendation, Coast Guard Special Operations Service Ribbon, National Defense Medal, Sea Service Deployment Ribbons (3), and various other service awards.

EXPERIENCE:
Herrington received his commission from Aviation Officer Candidate School in March 1984 and was designated a Naval Aviator in March 1985. He reported to Patrol Squadron Thirty-One (VP-31) at the Moffett Field Naval Air Station, Mountain View, California for initial training in the P-3C Orion. His first operational assignment was with Patrol Squadron Forty-Eight (VP-48) where he made three operational deployments, two to the Northern Pacific based from Naval Air Station Adak, Alaska and one to the Western Pacific based from the Naval Air Station Cubi Point, Republic of the Philippines. While assigned to VP-48, Herrington was designated a Patrol Plane Commander, Mission Commander, and Patrol Plane Instructor Pilot. Following completion of his first operational tour, Herrington then returned to VP-31 as a Fleet Replacement Squadron Instructor Pilot. While assigned to VP-31 he was selected to attend the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School in Patuxent River, Maryland in January 1990. After graduation in December, 1990, he reported to the Force Warfare Aircraft Test Directorate as a project test pilot for the Joint Primary Aircraft Training System. Herrington conducted additional flight test assignments flying numerous variants of the P-3 Orion as well as the T-34C and the DeHavilland Dash 7. Following his selection as an Aeronautical Engineering Duty Officer, Herrington reported to the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School where he completed a master of science degree in aeronautical engineering in June 1995. Herrington was assigned as a special projects officer to the Bureau of Naval Personnel Sea Duty Component when selected for the astronaut program.

He has logged over 2,300 flight hours in over 30 different types of aircraft.

NASA EXPERIENCE:
Selected by NASA in April 1996, Herrington reported to the Johnson Space Center in August 1996. Following initial training, he will be eligible for assignment within the astronaut office.

JANUARY 1997


More at: Herrington.

Family: Mission Specialist Astronaut, NASA Group 16 - 1996. Country: USA. Spacecraft: ISS. Flights: STS-113, STS-113 ISS EO-6. Agency: USN. Bibliography: 12, 5513.

1958 September 14 - .
  • Birth of John Bennett Herrington - . Nation: USA. Related Persons: Herrington. American test pilot mission specialist astronaut. Flew on STS-113..

1983 December 5 - .
  • NASA Astronaut Training Group 16 selected. - . Nation: USA. Related Persons: Brown, David, Burbank, Cagle, Caldeiro, Camarda, Carey, Clark, Fincke, Forrester, Frick, Guidoni, Herrington, Higginbotham, Hobaugh, Kelly, James, Kelly, Mark, Kelly, Scott, Lockhart, Loria, Magnus, Massimino, Mastracchio, McCool, Morin, Nowak, Pettit, Phillips.

    The group was selected to provide pilot, engineer, and scientist astronauts for space shuttle flights.. Qualifications: Pilots: Bachelor's degree in engineering, biological science, physical science or mathematics. Advanced degree desirable. At least 1,000 flight-hours of pilot-in-command time. Flight test experience desirable. Excellent health. Vision minimum 20/50 uncorrected, correctable to 20/20 vision; maximum sitting blood pressure 140/90. Height between 163 and 193 cm.

    Mission Specialists: Bachelor's degree in engineering, biological science, physical science or mathematics and minimum three years of related experience or an advanced degree. Vision minimum 20/150 uncorrected, correctable to 20/20. Maximum sitting blood pressure of 140/90. Height between 150 and 193 cm.. 10 pilots and 25 mission specialists selected from over 2,400 applicants. 9 additional international astronauts.


2002 October 25 - .
  • International Space Station Status Report #02-47 - . Nation: USA. Related Persons: Herrington, Korzun, Lonchakov, Lopez-Alegria, Whitson, Zalyotin. Program: ISS. Flight: STS-111 ISS EO-5. Having bid farewell to a visiting space shuttle crew last week, the Expedition 5 crewmembers began preparing for the arrival of the next two groups of visitors to the International Space Station, the Soyuz 5 taxi crew and the STS-113 space shuttle crew.. Additional Details: here....

2002 November 8 - .
2002 November 23 - .
  • STS-113 MCC Status Report #01 - . Nation: USA. Related Persons: Bowersox, Budarin, Herrington, Korzun, Lockhart, Lopez-Alegria, Pettit, Wetherbee, Whitson. Program: ISS. Flight: STS-111 ISS EO-5.

    Endeavour lifted off from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida at 6:50 p.m. CST today, carrying three new residents and a 14-ton truss segment to the International Space Station. At the time of Endeavour's launch, the International Space Station was orbiting 240 statute miles over Southern Austria. Additional Details: here....


2002 November 24 - .
2002 November 24 - .
2002 November 24 - . 00:49 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC39A. LV Family: Shuttle. Launch Vehicle: Space Shuttle.
  • STS-113 - . Call Sign: Endeavour. Crew: Bowersox, Budarin, Herrington, Lockhart, Lopez-Alegria, Pettit, Wetherbee. Payload: Endeavour F19 / P1. Mass: 115,000 kg (253,000 lb). Nation: USA. Related Persons: Bowersox, Budarin, Herrington, Lockhart, Lopez-Alegria, Pettit, Wetherbee. Agency: NASA. Manufacturer: Boeing. Program: ISS. Class: Manned. Type: Manned spaceplane. Flight: STS-113, STS-113 ISS EO-6. Spacecraft Bus: Shuttle. Spacecraft: Endeavour. Duration: 13.78 days. Decay Date: 2002-12-07 . USAF Sat Cat: 27556 . COSPAR: 2002-052A. Apogee: 397 km (246 mi). Perigee: 379 km (235 mi). Inclination: 51.6000 deg. Period: 92.30 min.

    ISS assembly mission ISS-11A delayed from August 22, September 6, 19, October 6, November 2, 10, 11, 19 and 23 due to SSME problems and then damage to the Shuttle's manipulator arm. Shuttle mission STS-113 carried a crew of seven astronauts (six American and one Russian) and a 13.7-m truss of 12.5 tons to the International Space Station (ISS). During several hours of EVA, the crew installed and secured the truss assembly. The truss was to provide structural support for the station's thermal control radiators, and brought the total mass of the ISS to over 200 tons. Prior to leaving the ISS, the shuttle released a pair of tethered (15-m long) picosatellites. It was to leave the ISS on December 2.


2002 November 25 - .
2002 November 25 - .
  • STS-113 MCC Status Report #04 - . Nation: USA. Related Persons: Bowersox, Budarin, Herrington, Korzun, Lockhart, Lopez-Alegria, Pettit, Wetherbee, Whitson. Program: ISS. Flight: STS-111 ISS EO-5, STS-113, STS-113 ISS EO-6.

    The crew of Endeavour awakened at 7:29 a.m. to begin final preparations for this afternoon's docking with the International Space Station. Endeavour is now 350 miles behind the space station closing the distance between them at the rate of about 130 miles every orbit. Docking is slated to occur at 3:26 p.m. central time today with the two spacecraft high over the Kazakh/Uzbekistan border. Additional Details: here....


2002 November 26 - .
2002 November 26 - .
2002 November 27 - .
  • STS-113 MCC Status Report #08 - . Nation: USA. Related Persons: Bowersox, Budarin, Herrington, Korzun, Lockhart, Lopez-Alegria, Pettit, Wetherbee, Whitson. Program: ISS. Flight: STS-111 ISS EO-5, STS-113, STS-113 ISS EO-6.

    Endeavour's crew today will focus its efforts on transferring supplies and equipment to the International Space Station that will be used by the station's Expedition Six crew during their four-month stay aboard the complex. The station and shuttle crew members also will move supplies, equipment and completed experiments that were used by the Expedition Five crew to the shuttle for return to Earth. Additional Details: here....


2002 November 27 - .
2002 November 27 - . 19:49 GMT - .
  • EVA STS-113-1 - . Crew: Herrington, Lopez-Alegria. EVA Duration: 0.28 days. Nation: USA. Related Persons: Herrington, Lopez-Alegria. Program: ISS. Flight: STS-113.

    The first spacewalk for installation of the P1 truss began at 1947 UTC. The astronauts emerged from the Quest module, attached the P1/S0 umbilicals, removed the P1 drag links and the CETA-B cart's launch restraints. They also installed more SPD disconnects on the ammonia lines, and attached a TV camera to the truss.


2002 November 28 - .
2002 November 28 - .
2002 November 29 - .
2002 November 29 - .
2002 November 29 - . 18:36 GMT - .
  • EVA STS-113-2 - . Crew: Herrington, Lopez-Alegria. EVA Duration: 0.26 days. Nation: USA. Related Persons: Herrington, Lopez-Alegria. Program: ISS. Flight: STS-113. The astronauts emerged from the Quest module at about 1845 UTC. They removed P1 keel pins and installed TV cameras, and moved the CETA-2 cart from P1 to S1..

2002 November 30 - .
  • STS-113 MCC Status Report #15 - . Nation: USA. Related Persons: Bowersox, Budarin, Herrington, Korzun, Lockhart, Lopez-Alegria. Program: ISS. Flight: STS-111 ISS EO-5, STS-113, STS-113 ISS EO-6.

    The third and final spacewalk of STS-113 ended at 8:25 p.m. central time today, as Mission Specialists Mike Lopez-Alegria and John Herrington climbed back inside the Quest Airlock. The two spacewalkers spent seven hours outside the International Space Station today, continuing the outfitting of the newly-installed P1 truss segment. Additional Details: here....


2002 November 30 - .
2002 December 1 - .
2002 December 1 - .
2002 December 1 - . 19:25 GMT - .
  • EVA STS-113-3 - . Crew: Herrington, Lopez-Alegria. EVA Duration: 0.29 days. Nation: USA. Related Persons: Herrington, Lopez-Alegria. Program: ISS. Flight: STS-113.

    It was planned to use the Mobile Transporter as a base for the SSRMS arm during the spacewalk. The MT was moved from worksite 4 on S0 to worksite 7 at the end of P1. Motion began at 1621 UTC but the MT got stuck a few meters short of its goal. The crew fell back on contingency training and opened the hatch of the Quest module at 1924 UTC. Instead of using the SSRMS for transport they spacewalked down the truss to the location of the MT. Here it was found that the MT was blocked by the undeployed P1 UHF antenna. The astronauts deployed it, clearing the MT's path. The MT finally reached its destination at 0011 UTC. This incident indicated problems with ISS configuration control but also showed the value of the astronauts' ability to handle unforeseen contingencies. During the spacewalk, the astronauts installed more fixes to the Station's ammonia line connectors, although dealing with the MT problem meant not all of the planned work could be completed.


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