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Camarda, Charles Joseph
Camarda
Camarda
Credit: www.spacefacts.de
American engineer mission specialist astronaut 1996-2006.

Status: Inactive; Active 1996-2006. Born: 1952-05-08. Spaceflights: 1 . Total time in space: 13.90 days. Birth Place: Queens, New York.

Educated George Washington; Virginia Poly.

Official NASA Biography as of June 2016:Charles J. Camarda (Ph.D.)
SENIOR ADVISOR FOR INNOVATION, OFFICE OF CHIEF ENGINEER,
JOHNSON SPACE CENTER

PERSONAL DATA: Born in 1952 in Queens, New York. Charlie enjoys racquetball, runningand weightlifting. His father, Jack Camarda, resides in Queens, New York.

EDUCATION: Graduated from Archbishop Molloy High School, Jamaica, New York, in 1970; received a Bachelor of Science Degree in aerospace engineering from Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn in 1974; a Master of Science Degree in Engineering Science from George Washington University in 1980; and a Doctorate in Aerospace engineering from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in 1990.

ORGANIZATIONS: Associate Fellow, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics.

AWARDS: NASA Certificates of Recognition (12); Sustained Superior Performance Awards (2); Special Achievement Awards (2); Technology Commercialization Awards (2); Space Station Program Team Excellence Award; NASA Group Achievement Award; NASA Superior Accomplishment Award; NASA Honor Award; One NASA Peer Award; Research and Development 100 Award from Industrial Research Magazine for one of the top 100 technical innovations in 1983, a Heat-Pipe-Cooled Sandwich Panel.

NASA EXPERIENCE: Upon completing his Bachelor’s Degree from the Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn, Dr. Camarda began work for NASA’s Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia, in 1974. He was a Research Scientist in the Thermal Structures Branch of the Structures and Materials Division and was responsible for demonstrating the feasibility of a heat-pipe-cooled leading edge for space shuttle by analysis, laboratory experiments and aerothermal testing in Langley’s 8-foot High Temperature Tunnel. He conducted analytical and experimental research in heat pipes, structural mechanics and dynamics, heat transfer and numerical optimization for aircraft, spacecraft and space launch vehicles. While at Langley, Camarda earned his Master’s Degree from George Washington University in Engineering Science with an emphasis on mechanics of composite structures at elevated temperature and his Doctorate Degree from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University with emphasis on the development of advanced modal methods for efficiently predicting transient thermal and structural performance. In 1989, Dr. Camarda was selected to lead the Structures and Materials Technology Maturation Team for the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP) program, which was responsible for maturing materials and structures technologies necessary to enable the development of an airbreathing hypersonic vehicle capable of horizontal take-off to orbit. Camarda was selected to head the Thermal Structures Branch (TSB) in 1994 with responsibility for a research engineering staff, two major focused programs (the High-Speed Research (HSR) and Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) programs) and several structural test facilities including the Thermal Structures Laboratory. Some of the primary responsibilities of the TSB are the development of durable, lightweight metallic Thermal Protection Systems (TPS), advanced leading edges for hypersonic vehicles using carbon carbon material and heat pipes, reusable cryogenic tank systems and graphite-composite primary structure for RLV. Camarda has received more than 21 NASA awards for technical innovations and accomplishments. He also received a Research and Development 100 award from Industrial Research Magazine for one of the top 100 technical innovations of 1983 entitled “Heat-Pipe-Cooled Sandwich Panel.” He holds seven patents and one patent pending.

Selected as an astronaut candidate by NASA in April 1996, Dr. Camarda reported to the NASA Johnson Space Center in August 1996. He completed two years of training and evaluation that qualified him for flight assignment as a mission specialist. Dr. Camarda has been assigned technical duties in the Astronaut Office Spacecraft Systems/Operations Branch, was on the Expedition-8 back-up crew, served as Director, Engineering, Johnson Space Center, and was assigned to the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC). Through the NESC, Dr. Camarda used his technical expertise to evaluate problems and supplement safety and engineering activities for Agency programs. Dr. Camarda flew as MS-5 on the Return to Flight mission STS-114 Discovery, and has logged more than 333 hours in space. Following his flight, he was the Director of Engineering at NASA’s Johnson Space Center and currently serves as Senior Advisor for Innovation to the Office of Chief Engineer, NASA Headquarters.

SPACE FLIGHT EXPERIENCE: STS-114 Discovery (July 26 through August 9, 2005) was the Return to Flight mission during which the Shuttle docked with the International Space Station and the crew tested and evaluated new procedures for flight safety and Shuttle inspection and repair techniques. After a two-week, 5.8 million mile journey in space, the orbiter and its crew of seven astronauts returned to land at Edwards Air Force Base, California.

MARCH 2014


NASA Official Biography

NAME: Charles J. Camarda (Ph.D.)
NASA Astronaut Candidate (Mission Specialist)

PERSONAL DATA:
Born May 8, 1952, in Queens, New York. Single. He has one child. He enjoys racquetball, running, weightlifting, boxing. His parents, Ray and Jack Camarda, reside in Queens, New York. His brother, Barney Camarda, and his family reside in Valley Stream, Long Island.
EDUCATION:
Graduated from Archbishop Molloy High School, Jamaica, New York, in 1970; received a bachelor of science degree in aerospace engineering from Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn in 1974; a master of science degree in engineering science from George Washington University in 1980; and a doctorate in aerospace engineering from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in 1990.

ORGANIZATIONS:
Associate Fellow, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics.

AWARDS:
NASA Certificates of Recognition (10); Sustained Superior Performance Awards (2); Special Achievement Awards (2); Technology Commercialization Awards (2); Research and Development 100 Award from Industrial Research Magazine for one of the top 100 technical innovations in 1983 - A Heat-Pipe-Cooled Sandwich Panel.

NASA EXPERIENCE:
Upon completing his B.S. degree from the Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn, Camarda began work for NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia, in 1974. He was a research scientist in the Thermal Structures Branch of the Structures and Materials Division and was responsible for demonstrating the feasibility of a heat-pipe-cooled leading edge for Space Shuttle by analysis, laboratory experiments, and aerothermal testing in Langley's 8-foot High Temperature Tunnel. He conducted analytical and experimental research in heat pipes, structural mechanics and dynamics, heat transfer, and numerical optimization for aircraft, spacecraft, and space launch vehicles. While at Langley, Camarda earned his masters degree from George Washington University in Engineering Science with emphasis on mechanics of composite structures at elevated temperature and his doctorate degree from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University with emphasis on the development of advanced modal methods for efficiently predicting transient thermal and structural performance. In 1989, Camarda was selected to lead the Structures and Materials Technology Maturation Team for the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP) program which was responsible for maturing materials and structures technologies necessary to enable the development of an airbreathing hypersonic vehicle capable of horizontal take-off to orbit. Camarda was selected to head the Thermal Structures Branch (TSB) in 1994 with responsibility for a research engineering staff, two major focused programs (the high-speed research (HSR) and reusable launch vehicle (RLV) programs), and several structural test facilities including the Thermal Structures Laboratory. Some of the primary responsibilities of the TSB is the development of durable, lightweight metallic thermal protection systems (TPS), reusable cryogenic tank systems, and graphite-composite primary structure for RLV. Camarda has received over 18 NASA awards for technical innovations and accomplishments. He also received a Research and Development 100 award from Industrial Research Magazine for one of the top 100 technical innovations of 1983 entitled "Heat-Pipe-Cooled Sandwich Panel." He holds four patents and has two patents pending.

Dr. Camarda was selected as an astronaut candidate by NASA in April 1996. He reported to the NASA Johnson Space Center in August 1996 to begin two years of training and evaluation. Successful completion of initial training will qualify him for various technical assignments leading to selection as a mission specialist on a Space Shuttle flight crew.

JANUARY 1997


More at: Camarda.

Family: Mission Specialist Astronaut, NASA Group 16 - 1996. Country: USA. Spacecraft: ISS. Flights: STS-114. Bibliography: 12, 5235.

1952 May 8 - .
  • Birth of Charles Joseph Camarda - . Nation: USA. Related Persons: Camarda. American engineer mission specialist astronaut. Flew on STS-114..

1983 December 5 - .
  • NASA Astronaut Training Group 16 selected. - . Nation: USA. Related Persons: Brown, David, Burbank, Cagle, Caldeiro, Camarda, Carey, Clark, Fincke, Forrester, Frick, Guidoni, Herrington, Higginbotham, Hobaugh, Kelly, James, Kelly, Mark, Kelly, Scott, Lockhart, Loria, Magnus, Massimino, Mastracchio, McCool, Morin, Nowak, Pettit, Phillips.

    The group was selected to provide pilot, engineer, and scientist astronauts for space shuttle flights.. Qualifications: Pilots: Bachelor's degree in engineering, biological science, physical science or mathematics. Advanced degree desirable. At least 1,000 flight-hours of pilot-in-command time. Flight test experience desirable. Excellent health. Vision minimum 20/50 uncorrected, correctable to 20/20 vision; maximum sitting blood pressure 140/90. Height between 163 and 193 cm.

    Mission Specialists: Bachelor's degree in engineering, biological science, physical science or mathematics and minimum three years of related experience or an advanced degree. Vision minimum 20/150 uncorrected, correctable to 20/20. Maximum sitting blood pressure of 140/90. Height between 150 and 193 cm.. 10 pilots and 25 mission specialists selected from over 2,400 applicants. 9 additional international astronauts.


2005 July 26 - .
2005 July 26 - . 14:39 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC39B. LV Family: Shuttle. Launch Vehicle: Space Shuttle.
  • STS-114 - . Call Sign: Discovery. Crew: Camarda, Collins, Eileen, Kelly, James, Lawrence, Noguchi, Robinson, Thomas, Andrew. Payload: Discovery F31 / Raffaello. Mass: 116,884 kg (257,685 lb). Nation: USA. Related Persons: Camarda, Collins, Eileen, Kelly, James, Lawrence, Noguchi, Robinson, Thomas, Andrew. Agency: NASA. Manufacturer: Boeing. Program: ISS. Class: Manned. Type: Manned spaceplane. Flight: Soyuz TMA-6, STS-114. Spacecraft Bus: Shuttle. Spacecraft: Discovery. Duration: 13.90 days. Decay Date: 2005-08-09 . USAF Sat Cat: 28775 . COSPAR: 2005-026A. Apogee: 350 km (210 mi). Perigee: 313 km (194 mi). Inclination: 51.6000 deg. Period: 91.20 min.

    Return to flight after loss of Columbia. Delayed extensively as NASA attempted to fix the external tank foam-shedding problem that resulted in the loss of Columbia (first planned for September 12, 2004, the launch slipped to March; May 14, 15 and 22; July 13, 2005). Discovery safely reached orbit at a total mass of 121,485 kg, but extensive video coverage detected external tank foam shedding during ascent. Discovery docked at the Pirs module of the ISS on 28 July 28 at 11:18 GMT. Following replenishment of the station (using the Raffaello MPLM-6 module with 8240 kg of supplies), a series of spacewalks verified the integrity of the shuttle's heat shield and tested repair techniques, Discovery undocked from the ISS at 07:24 GMT on 6 August and landed safely on Runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base at 12:11 GMT on 9 August. However the shuttle fleet was immediately grounded again while NASA attempted to find a permanent fix to the external tank foam woes.


2005 July 27 - .
2005 July 27 - .
2005 July 27 - .
2005 July 28 - .
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2005 July 29 - .
2005 July 29 - .
2005 July 30 - .
  • STS-114 MCC Status Report #09 - . Nation: USA. Related Persons: Camarda, Collins, Eileen, Kelly, James, Krikalyov, Lawrence, Noguchi, Phillips, Robinson, Thomas, Andrew. Program: ISS. Flight: Soyuz TMA-6, STS-114.

    Space Shuttle Discovery's heat protective tiles and thermal blankets have been pronounced fit for entry after engineers reviewed the imagery and other data to judge their health. Analysis remains on the reinforced carbon-carbon wing leading edges and the protruding gap fillers identified earlier. Aerodynamics experts are evaluating the effect on surface heating that the gap fillers may cause to decide whether any work is necessary to reduce their size. Additional Details: here....


2005 July 30 - .
  • STS-114 MCC Status Report #10 - . Nation: USA. Related Persons: Camarda, Collins, Eileen, Kelly, James, Lawrence, Noguchi, Phillips, Robinson. Program: ISS. Flight: Soyuz TMA-6, STS-114.

    Transfers of additional water and supplies to the International Space Station will continue Sunday as the crew aboard Space Shuttle Discovery begins Flight Day 6. The STS-114 mission was formally extended by one day as mission managers Saturday decided to spend one more day docked to the ISS. Additional Details: here....


2005 July 31 - .
2005 July 31 - .
2005 August 1 - .
  • STS-114 MCC Status Report #13 - . Nation: USA. Related Persons: Camarda, Collins, Eileen, Kelly, James, Krikalyov, Lawrence, Noguchi, Phillips, Robinson, Thomas, Andrew. Program: ISS. Flight: Soyuz TMA-6, STS-114.

    STS-114 mission managers Monday gave the go-ahead for astronauts to remove two protruding gap fillers in Discovery's heat shield during a Wednesday space walk. Soichi Noguchi and Steve Robinson will attempt to simply pull the thin fabric fillers from between tiles in the forward area of the orbiter's underside. If the pull method is unsuccessful, the two will have tools to cut the material flush with the surface. Additional Details: here....


2005 August 2 - .
2005 August 3 - .
2005 August 3 - .
2005 August 4 - .
  • STS-114 MCC Status Report #20 - . Nation: USA. Related Persons: Camarda, Collins, Eileen, Kelly, James, Krikalyov, Lawrence, Noguchi, Phillips, Robinson, Thomas, Andrew. Program: ISS. Flight: Soyuz TMA-6, STS-114.

    Now in their eleventh day of the mission and with three successful spacewalks behind them, the STS-114 crew of Space Shuttle Discovery is slated to begin preparations for undocking and the final day with their International Space Station counterparts. Their activities for the day include final equipment transfers, stowage and return of the robotic arm, boom and cargo container to the Shuttle payload bay. Additional Details: here....


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2005 August 9 - .
2005 August 9 - . 12:11 GMT - .

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