Home - Search - Browse - Alphabetic Index: 0- 1- 2- 3- 4- 5- 6- 7- 8- 9
A- B- C- D- E- F- G- H- I- J- K- L- M- N- O- P- Q- R- S- T- U- V- W- X- Y- Z
Wilson, Stephanie Diana
Wilson
Wilson
Credit: www.spacefacts.de
American engineer mission specialist astronaut 1996-2013. Engineer.

Status: Inactive; Active 1996-2013. Born: 1966-09-27. Spaceflights: 3 . Total time in space: 42.99 days. Birth Place: Massachusetts.

Educated Harvard; Texas.

Official NASA Biography as of June 2016:Stephanie D. Wilson 
NASA Astronaut

PERSONAL DATA:  Born in 1966 in Boston, Massachusetts.  Enjoys snow skiing, music, stamp collecting and traveling.

EDUCATION:  Graduated from Taconic High School, Pittsfield, Massachusetts, 1984. Bachelor of Science in Engineering Science from Harvard University, 1988. Master of Science in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Texas, 1992.

ORGANIZATIONS:  The American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (Associate Fellow); The Association of Space Explorers; The Society of Women Engineers; The Harvard University Board of Overseers (2007-2013); The Links Incorporated.

SPECIAL HONORS:  Several group achievement and performance awards (1992 to 2008);  Young Outstanding Texas Exes Award (2005);  Harvard Foundation Scientist of the Year Award (2008);  Harvard College Women's Professional Achievement Award (2008); Honorary Doctorate of Science from Williams College (2011);  NASA Space Flight Medal (2006, 2007, 2010);  NASA Distinguished Service Medal (2009, 2011);  Johnson Space Center Director's Innovation Group Achievement Award (2013); Johnson Space Center Director Commendation Award (2013).

EXPERIENCE:  After graduating from Harvard in 1988, Wilson worked two years for the former Martin Marietta Astronautics Group in Denver, Colorado.  As a loads and dynamics engineer for Titan IV, Wilson was responsible for performing coupled loads analyses for the launch vehicle and payloads during flight events.  Wilson left Martin Marietta in 1990 to attend graduate school at the University of Texas at Austin.  Her research, sponsored by NASA's Langley Research Center through a NASA Graduate Student Researchers Fellowship, focused on the control and modeling of large, flexible space structures, ultimately culminating in a thesis comparing structural dynamics methodologies and controller designs. Following the completion of her graduate work, she began working for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California in 1992.  As a member of the Attitude and Articulation Control Subsystem team for the Galileo spacecraft, Wilson was responsible for assessing attitude controller performance, science platform pointing accuracy, antenna pointing accuracy and spin rate accuracy.  She worked in the areas of sequence development and testing as well.  While at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Wilson also supported the Interferometery Technology Program as a member of the Integrated Modeling team, which was responsible for finite element modeling, controller design and software development.

NASA EXPERIENCE:  Selected as an astronaut by NASA in April 1996. In August 1996, Wilson reported to NASA's Johnson Space Center.  She completed two years of training and evaluation and became qualified for flight assignment as a mission specialist.  Wilson was initially assigned technical duties in the Astronaut Office Space Station branch to develop requirements for space station payload displays and procedures and to evaluate their user interfaces.  She then served as a Capsule Communicator (CAPCOM) in the Astronaut Office CAPCOM branch, working in the Mission Control Center as a prime communicator with several space shuttle and space station crews.  Following her work in mission control, Wilson was assigned technical duties involving the space shuttle main engines, external tank and solid rocket boosters in the Astronaut Office Space Shuttle branch.  In November 2004, Wilson was assigned to STS-121.  Following STS-121, she served in the Astronaut Office Robotics branch performing robotics procedure reviews and serving as a robotics mentor and instructor astronaut.  In November 2006, Wilson was assigned to STS-120.  Following STS-120 she was assigned joint duty in both the Astronaut Office Exploration and International Space Station branches.  With respect to space station branch work, Wilson served as the Astronaut Office primary representative to the Generic Joint Operations Panel for space shuttle and space station issues. For the Exploration branch, she served as the Astronaut Office representative for the Orion Communications and Tracking System. In May 2009, Wilson was assigned to STS-131.

Following STS-131, within the Space Station Integration branch, she served as the Operations Products lead further developing crew efficiencies in operations products, and as the Payload lead interfacing with NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center to resolve payload process, operations nomenclature and procedure issues. Wilson also served for two years as the Space Station Integration Branch Chief, where she was responsible for overseeing crew issues related to space station systems, payloads, operations products and software interfaces.  As part of a unique opportunity in 2013, Wilson completed a nine-month detail to NASA's Glenn Research Center as the Acting Chief of Program and Project Integration within the Spaceflight Systems Directorate. In this role she was responsible for overseeing the program, planning and control functions for Glenn's spaceflight projects.  Following her detail to Glenn, Wilson was assigned to the Space Station Operations branch as the lead Crew Support astronaut.  Wilson has also served as a member of the 2009 and 2013 Astronaut Selection Boards.  A veteran of three spaceflights, STS-121 in 2006, STS-120 in 2007 and STS-131 in 2010, Wilson has logged more than 42 days in space.

SPACEFLIGHT EXPERIENCE:  STS-121 Discovery (July 4 through July 17, 2006) was a Return to Flight test mission and assembly flight to the International Space Station.  During the 13-day flight, the crew of space shuttle Discovery tested new equipment and procedures that increase the safety of the space shuttle and repaired a rail car on the station.  Wilson served as the robotic arm operator for vehicle inspection and for the installation of the €śLeonardo€ť Multi-Purpose Logistics Module.  She was also assigned as the loadmaster responsible for overseeing the transfer of more than 15,000 pounds of supplies and equipment to the space station.  In addition, the crew delivered a new Expedition 13 crew member to the space station. The mission was accomplished in 12 days, 18 hours, 37 minutes and 54 seconds and produced never-before-seen, high-resolution images of the shuttle during and after its July 4th launch.

STS-120 Discovery (October 23  through November 7, 2007), also designated as flight 10A in the International Space Station assembly sequence, was launched from and returned to land at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, Florida.  STS-120 delivered the Node 2 €śHarmony€ť module to the station, establishing the necessary capability for future international laboratories to be added to the space station.  STS-120 also delivered an Expedition 16 crew member and returned with an Expedition 15 crew member.  During ascent and entry, Wilson served as the flight engineer, assisting the commander and pilot with space shuttle systems.  She was also assigned as the primary robotic arm operator for vehicle inspection and spacewalk support, helping to replace the S-band antenna and to relocate the P6 solar array from the Z1 truss to the end of the Integrated Truss Segment.  During the deployment of the solar array, the array panels snagged and were damaged. Wilson was the primary robotic arm operator for the unplanned spacewalk that successfully repaired the solar array. The mission was accomplished in 238 orbits, traveling 6.2 million miles in 15 days, 2 hours and 23 minutes.

STS-131 Discovery (April 5 through April 20, 2010), a resupply mission to the International Space Station, was launched pre-dawn from Kennedy.  Once docked to the space station, the crew delivered more than 27,000 pounds of hardware, supplies, experiments and equipment, including a tank full of ammonia coolant that required three spacewalks and robotics to install, new crew sleeping quarters, a window observation facility and a freezer for experiments.  During the mission, Wilson was responsible for robotics for spacewalking support using the space station robotic arm and for robotic removal of the €śLeonardo€ť Multi-Purpose Logistics Module from the payload bay of Discovery.  For the return to Earth, Wilson robotically installed Leonardo, which was packed with more than 6,000 pounds of hardware, science results and used supplies, inside Discovery's payload bay.  The STS-131 mission was accomplished in 15 days, 2 hours, 47 minutes and 10 seconds and traveled 6,232,235 statute miles in 238 orbits.

JULY 2014


NASA Official Biography

NAME: Stephanie D. Wilson
NASA Astronaut Candidate (Mission Specialist)

PERSONAL DATA:
Born September 27, 1966 in Boston Massachusetts. Enjoys snow skiing, music, astronomy, stamp collecting, and traveling.

EDUCATION:
Graduated from Taconic High School, Pittsfield, Massachusetts, in 1984; received a bachelor of science degree in engineering science from Harvard University in 1988, and a master of science degree in aerospace engineering from the University of Texas, in 1992.

ORGANIZATIONS:
American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Society for the Advancement of Material and Process Engineering.

EXPERIENCE:
After graduating from Harvard in 1988, Wilson worked for 2 years for the former Martin Marietta Astronautics Group in Denver, Colorado. As a Loads and Dynamics engineer for Titan IV, Wilson was responsible for performing coupled loads analyses for the launch vehicle and payloads during flight events. Wilson left Martin Marietta in 1990 to attend graduate school at the University of Texas. Her research focused on the control and modeling of large, flexible space structures. Following the completion of her graduate work, she began working for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, in 1992. As a member of the Attitude and Articulation Control Subsystem for the Galileo spacecraft, Wilson was responsible for assessing attitude controller performance, science platform pointing accuracy, antenna pointing accuracy and spin rate accuracy. She worked in the areas of sequence development and testing as well. While at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Wilson also supported the Interferometery Technology Program as a member of the Integrated Modeling Team, which was responsible for finite element modeling, controller design, and software development.

NASA EXPERIENCE:
Selected by NASA in April 1996, Wilson reported to the Johnson Space Center in August 1996 to begin two years of training and evaluation. Successful completion of initial training will qualify her for various technical assignments leading to selection as a mission specialist on a Space Shuttle flight crew.

JANUARY 1997


More at: Wilson.

Family: Mission Specialist Astronaut, NASA Group 16 - 1996, Women of Space. Country: USA. Spacecraft: ISS. Flights: STS-120A, STS-121, STS-120, STS-131. Bibliography: 12, 6213.

1966 September 27 - .
  • Birth of Stephanie Diana Wilson - . Nation: USA. Related Persons: Wilson. African-American engineer mission specialist astronaut. Flew on STS-121, STS-120, STS-131. Engineer..

1983 December 5 - .
  • NASA Astronaut Training Group 16 selected. - . Nation: USA. Related Persons: Brown, David, Burbank, Cagle, Caldeiro, Camarda, Carey, Clark, Fincke, Forrester, Frick, Guidoni, Herrington, Higginbotham, Hobaugh, Kelly, James, Kelly, Mark, Kelly, Scott, Lockhart, Loria, Magnus, Massimino, Mastracchio, McCool, Morin, Nowak, Pettit, Phillips.

    The group was selected to provide pilot, engineer, and scientist astronauts for space shuttle flights.. Qualifications: Pilots: Bachelor's degree in engineering, biological science, physical science or mathematics. Advanced degree desirable. At least 1,000 flight-hours of pilot-in-command time. Flight test experience desirable. Excellent health. Vision minimum 20/50 uncorrected, correctable to 20/20 vision; maximum sitting blood pressure 140/90. Height between 163 and 193 cm.

    Mission Specialists: Bachelor's degree in engineering, biological science, physical science or mathematics and minimum three years of related experience or an advanced degree. Vision minimum 20/150 uncorrected, correctable to 20/20. Maximum sitting blood pressure of 140/90. Height between 150 and 193 cm.. 10 pilots and 25 mission specialists selected from over 2,400 applicants. 9 additional international astronauts.


2004 February 19 - .
2006 July 4 - .
2006 July 4 - . 18:38 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC39B. LV Family: Shuttle. Launch Vehicle: Space Shuttle.
  • STS-121 - . Call Sign: Discovery. Crew: Fossum, Kelly, Mark, Lindsey, Nowak, Reiter, Sellers, Wilson. Return Crew: Fossum, Kelly, Mark, Lindsey, Nowak, Sellers, Wilson. Payload: Discovery F32 / Leonardo. Mass: 121,094 kg (266,966 lb). Nation: USA. Related Persons: Fossum, Kelly, Mark, Lindsey, Nowak, Reiter, Sellers, Wilson. Agency: NASA. Manufacturer: Boeing. Program: ISS. Class: Manned. Type: Manned spaceplane. Flight: Soyuz TMA-8, STS-121, STS-121 Astrolab. Spacecraft Bus: Shuttle. Spacecraft: Discovery. Duration: 12.78 days. Decay Date: 2006-07-17 . USAF Sat Cat: 29251 . COSPAR: 2006-028A. Apogee: 351 km (218 mi). Perigee: 332 km (206 mi). Inclination: 51.6000 deg. Period: 91.40 min.

    The shuttle was launched using external tank ET-119 and solid motors RSRM-93. Cameras revealed that large chunks of foam were still shed from the external tank during the ascent to orbit. However examination of the heat shield using a new extension and sensors attached to the shuttle's robot arm revealed no significant damage. Discovery docked with the PMA-2 adapter on the Destiny module of the ISS at 14:52 GMT on 6 July. On July 7 the Leonardo cargo module was moved from the shuttle payload bay by the robot arm and docked to the Unity Module of the ISS between 09:42 and 11:50 GMT. The crew then began unloading the spare parts and supplies in the module to the station. A series of three EVAs conducted on 8 to 12 July tested the new equipment and techniques for repairing the shuttle heat shield in case of damage, and did some preliminary installations on the exterior of the ISS to pave the way for continued station assembly missions. On 14 July, the station's SSRMS robot moved the Leonardo module from the station back to the shuttle cargo bay between 13:08 and 14:50 GMT. The shuttle separated from the ISS, and fired its engines at 12:07 GMT on 17 July to make a 92 m/s deorbit maneuver. Discovery landed at the Kennedy Space Center at 13:14 GMT. European astronaut Reiter was left behind to make up part of the EO-13 resident crew on the station.


2006 July 5 - .
2006 July 5 - .
2006 July 6 - .
2006 July 6 - .
2006 July 7 - .
  • STS-121 MCC Status Report #07 - . Nation: USA. Related Persons: Wilson. Program: ISS. Flight: Soyuz TMA-8, STS-121. The STS-121 Mission Management Team Friday decided to extend Discovery’s flight by an additional day to 13 days after reviewing the rate at which the orbiter’s consumables are being used.. Additional Details: here....

2006 July 7 - .
2006 July 8 - .
2006 July 8 - .
2006 July 9 - .
2006 July 9 - .
2006 July 10 - .
2006 July 10 - .
2006 July 11 - .
2006 July 11 - .
2006 July 12 - .
2006 July 12 - .
2006 July 13 - .
2006 July 14 - .
2006 July 14 - .
2006 July 15 - .
2006 July 15 - .
2006 July 16 - .
2006 July 17 - .
2006 July 17 - . 13:14 GMT - .
2007 October 23 - .
2007 October 23 - .
2007 October 23 - . 15:38 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC39A. LV Family: Shuttle. Launch Vehicle: Space Shuttle.
  • STS-120 - . Call Sign: Discovery. Crew: Melroy, Nespoli, Parazynski, Tani, Wheelock, Wilson, Zamka. Return Crew: Anderson, Clayton, Melroy, Nespoli, Parazynski, Wheelock, Wilson, Zamka. Payload: Discovery F33 / Harmony / ISS-10A. Mass: 123,400 kg (272,000 lb). Nation: USA. Related Persons: Anderson, Clayton, Melroy, Nespoli, Parazynski, Tani, Wheelock, Wilson, Zamka. Agency: NASA. Program: ISS. Class: Manned. Type: Manned spaceplane. Flight: Soyuz TMA-10, Soyuz TMA-11, STS-117 ISS EO-15, STS-120, STS-120 ISS EO-16. Spacecraft Bus: Shuttle. Spacecraft: Discovery. Duration: 15.10 days. Decay Date: 2007-11-07 . USAF Sat Cat: 32272 . COSPAR: 2007-050A. Apogee: 344 km (213 mi). Perigee: 340 km (210 mi). Inclination: 51.6000 deg. Period: 91.40 min.

    Main mission objectives were delivery of the Harmony module to the station, and external work to move the P6 truss to its final location and put the ISS into its full-power configuration for the first time. Discovery docked with the ISS at the Destiny module at 12:40 GMT on 25 October. The cargo of 17,390 kg was as follows:

    • Orbiter Docking System - Bay 1-2 - 1800 kg
    • Spacesuit EMU 3004 - 130 kg
    • Spacesuit EMU 3003 - 130 kg
    • Station Power Distribution Unit SPDU - Bay 3P - 100 kg
    • Fixture for return of S-band Antenna - SASA FSE - Bay 3P - 4S - 100 kg
    • Power/Data Grapple Fixture for Node-2 - PDGF - Bay 5P - 50 kg
    • Main Bus Switching Unit - MBSU - Bay 6S - 238 kg
    • MBSU adapter - Bay 6S - 122 kg
    • Station Power Distribution Unit - SPDU - Bay 6S - 7P - 100 kg
    • Node-2 Harmony module - Bays 8-12 - 14,300 kg
    • OBSS 203 - Sill 450 kg
    • RMS 301 - Sill 410 kg

2007 October 24 - .
2007 October 24 - .
2007 October 25 - .
2007 October 26 - .
  • STS-120 MCC Status Report #8 - . Nation: USA. Related Persons: Anderson, Clayton, Nespoli, Parazynski, Tani, Wheelock, Whitson, Wilson. Program: ISS. Flight: Soyuz TMA-10, STS-117 ISS EO-15, STS-120.

    It proved to be a perfect day for a spacewalk. In just over six hours, STS-120 Mission Specialists Scott Parazynski and Doug Wheelock installed the Harmony module in its temporary location on the International Space Station, readied the P6 truss for its relocation on Sunday, retrieved a failed radio communications antenna and snapped shut a window cover on Harmony that opened during launch on the space shuttle. Additional Details: here....


2007 October 27 - .
2007 October 28 - .
2007 October 28 - .
2007 October 29 - .
2007 October 30 - .
  • STS-120 MCC Status Report #15 - . Nation: USA. Related Persons: Parazynski, Tani, Wheelock, Wilson, Zamka. Program: ISS. Flight: Soyuz TMA-10, STS-117 ISS EO-15, STS-120.

    Astronauts Scott Parazynski and Doug Wheelock today install the International Space Station’s P6 truss in its final location. A new task was also added to this third spacewalk of the mission to provide comparison data of the station’s two solar array rotary joints. The spacewalk is set to begin at 3:53 a.m. CDT. Additional Details: here....


2007 November 1 - .
2007 November 2 - .
2007 November 3 - .
2007 November 4 - .
2007 November 4 - .
2007 November 5 - .
  • STS-120 MCC Status Report #27 - . Nation: USA. Related Persons: Melroy, Nespoli, Parazynski, Wilson, Zamka. Program: ISS. Flight: Soyuz TMA-10, STS-117 ISS EO-15, STS-120.

    All systems are go for this morning’s undocking of space shuttle Discovery from the International Space Station, completing 11 days of joint docked operations that saw the successful delivery of a new pressurized module and the repair of a damaged solar array wing. Additional Details: here....


2007 November 6 - .
2007 November 7 - .
2007 November 7 - . 18:01 GMT - .
2010 April 5 - . 10:21 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC39A. LV Family: Shuttle. Launch Vehicle: Space Shuttle.
  • STS-131 - . Call Sign: Discovery. Crew: Anderson, Clayton, Dutton, Mastracchio, Metcalf-Lindenburger, Poindexter, Wilson, Yamazaki. Payload: Discovery F37 /. Mass: 121,047 kg (266,862 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: NASA. Program: ISS. Class: Manned. Type: Manned spaceplane. Flight: Soyuz TMA-17, Soyuz TMA-18, STS-131. Spacecraft Bus: Shuttle. Spacecraft: Discovery. Duration: 15.12 days. Decay Date: 2010-04-20 . USAF Sat Cat: 36507 . COSPAR: 2010-012A. Apogee: 346 km (214 mi). Perigee: 322 km (200 mi). Inclination: 51.6000 deg. Period: 91.20 min. Crew: Poindexter;Dutton;Metcalf-Lendenburger;Wilson;Mastracchiio;Yamazaki;Anderson,Clayton. Contingency flight to assure ISS completion; nominal payload EXPRESS Logistics Carrier 3 (ELC3) and EXPRESS Logistics Carrier 4 (ELC4)..

2017 January 6 - .
  • EVA ISS US EVA-38 - . Crew: Kimbrough, Wilson. EVA Duration: 0.25 days. Nation: USA. Program: ISS.

    Astronauts Kimbrough and Whitson, in suits EMU 3008 and 3006, depressurized the Quest airlock at about 1220 UTC for US EVA-38. They moved various batteries and adapter plates as part of a refurbishment of the ISS power system. Bundle 1 of the Node 3 axial shields were stored outside Quest.



Home - Search - Browse - Alphabetic Index: 0- 1- 2- 3- 4- 5- 6- 7- 8- 9
A- B- C- D- E- F- G- H- I- J- K- L- M- N- O- P- Q- R- S- T- U- V- W- X- Y- Z
© 1997-2017 Mark Wade - Contact
© / Conditions for Use