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Orion
Part of Orion CEV Family
Orion and LASM
Orion and LASM
Credit: NASA
American manned spacecraft. In development. NASA's Crew Excursion Vehicle for the 21st Century. Built by Lockheed Martin.

Status: Operational 2014. First Launch: 2014-12-05. Last Launch: 2014-12-05. Number: 1 . Thrust: 33.40 kN (7,509 lbf). Gross mass: 21,500 kg (47,300 lb). Unfuelled mass: 11,750 kg (25,900 lb). Height: 9.10 m (29.80 ft). Diameter: 5.03 m (16.50 ft). Span: 17.00 m (55.00 ft). Apogee: 85 km (52 mi).

On 31 August 2006 NASA selected Lockheed Martin as the prime contractor to build the Crew Exploration Vehicle, dubbed Orion. Orion's first mission would be to shuttle up to six crew members to and from the International Space Station. It also would serve as a lifeboat for the station crew while docked for up to 210 days with the station. Orion was also designed to transport four crew to lunar orbit and back to earth for NASA's later planned return to the moon. Developments of the spacecraft would also provide the re-entry vehicle for return from any eventual manned Mars missions.

By the date of the contract award NASA had slipped the first launch date by almost four years, to 'no later than 2014'. Any moon landing (which would require funding for development of the Ares V launch vehicle and LSSM lunar module) would not come until 2020 at the earliest.

Lockheed Martin beat out a Northrop Grumman/Boeing team at the conclusion of a two-phase selection process. More than any previous contract, the spacecraft would be designed, developed, and built under NASA direction and on NASA premises. Lockheed Martin was to perform the majority of the Orion vehicle engineering work at NASA's Johnson Space Center, Houston, and complete final assembly of the vehicle at the Kennedy Space Center, Fla. All 10 NASA centers were provided work in terms of 'technical and engineering support' to the Orion project.

The cost-plus-award-fee incentive DDT&E contract was to run from September 8, 2006, through September 7, 2013. Estimated value at award was $3.9 billion. Follow-on delivery orders for production flight vehicles were expected to be issued as early as 8 September 2009. If all options were exercised, delivery orders would be issued through 2019 and had an additional total value of $3.5 billion. Additional 'sustaining engineering' work for Lockheed-Martin would be contracted in the form of task orders, issued concurrent with production delivery orders, with a total value of $750 million through 2019.

Development Cost $: 3,900.000 million. Cost Notes: Development cost. Crew Size: 6. Orbital Storage: 210 days. Habitable Volume: 10.23 m3. RCS Coarse No x Thrust: 16 x 445 N. Spacecraft delta v: 1,855 m/s (6,085 ft/sec). Electric System: 9.15 average kW.


More at: Orion.

Subtopics

Orion Satellite Systems Orion Satellite Systems, USA. Domestic communications satellite network.

Family: Manned spacecraft, New Generation Crewed. Country: USA. Spacecraft: Eurostar 2000, HS 601, Orion CM, Orion SM, Orion SA, Orion LAS. Launch Vehicles: Atlas IIA, Delta 8930, Delta IV, Delta 4H, Ares FBB, Ares I-X. Propellants: N2O4/MMH. Launch Sites: Cape Canaveral, Cape Canaveral LC37B. Agency: NASA, El Segundo, Toulouse, Orion Satellite Systems, P. Bibliography: 6756, 12922, 12923.
Photo Gallery

OrionOrion
Credit: Manufacturer Image


OrionOrion
Credit: Manufacturer Image


Orion EFT-1Orion EFT-1
Credit: Manufacturer Image


OrionOrion
Credit: Manufacturer Image


Orion Upper StageOrion Upper Stage
Orion configured as Saturn V upper stage.


Orion/Saturn VOrion/Saturn V
Orion launch profile on Saturn V


Orion at MarsOrion at Mars
Orion nuclear pulse vessel arrives at Mars and releases lander.


Orion Mars ConfiguraOrion Mars Configura
Orion configured for Mars expedition.



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