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Navstar
GPS IIA in assembly
GPS IIA in assembly
Credit: Hughes
The Navstar GPS (Global Positioning System) program was a joint service effort directed by the United States Department of Defense. Navstar GPS is a space-based radio-positioning system nominally consisting of a 24-satellite constellation that provides navigation and timing information to military and civilian users worldwide. In addition to the satellites, the system consists of a worldwide satellite control network and GPS receiver units that acquire the satellite's signals and translate them into position information. Originally envisioned as primarily a military system, GPS was found to have a wide variety of civilian applications, many of them never conceived by the original system's designers.

AKA: GPS.

By 2000 civilian users greatly outnumbered military users, and the trend increased year-by-year. The very similar Russian GLONASS system used similar frequencies and single receivers could be built to handle signals from both satellites. Concerns about the US control over a system that came to be essential to civilian and military users worldwide led Europe to begin development of their own independent Galileo system in 2002.

GPS is managed by an Interagency GPS Executive Board. The US Air Force is designated as the executive service for system management. The system is operated and controlled by the 50th Space Wing's (Air Force Space Command) 2nd Space Operations Squadron, Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado. The Space and Missile Systems Center's (Air Force Space Command) Navstar GPS Joint Program Office, Los Angeles Air Force Base, California, is the DoD agency for acquiring GPS satellites, ground systems and military user equipment.

Delta II expendable launch vehicles are used to launch the GPS satellites from Cape Canaveral Air Station, FL, into six planes of circular 20,200 km / 12-hour orbits .

GPS provides the following:

The GPS worldwide satellite control system consists of five monitor stations and four ground antennas. The monitor stations use GPS receivers to passively track the navigation signals of all the satellites. Information from the monitor stations is then processed at the master control stations, operated by the 2nd Space Operations Squadron at Schriever Air Force Base, CO., and used to accurately update the satellites' navigation messages. The Master Control Station at Schriever Air Force Base sends updated navigation information to the GPS satellites through ground antennas using an S-band signal. The ground antennas are also used to transmit commands to satellites and to receive the satellites' state-of-the-art telemetry data.

The signals are so accurate that time can be figured to within 100 nanoseconds, velocity can be figured to within a fraction of a km per hour, and location can be figured to within meters.

GPS satellites orbit the earth every 12 hours emitting continuous navigation signals on two different L-band frequencies, L1 and L2.

Fundamental research on timing and navigation technology for Navstar was conducted by the Timation satellite series in the 1960's. There followed four generations of GPS satellites: the Block I, the Block IIA, the Block IIR, and the Block IIF. Block I satellites were used to test the principles of the Global Positioning System, and lessons learned from these 11 satellites were incorporated into later blocks. Block II, IIA and IIR satellites made up the constellation by the turn of the century. A total of 28 II/IIAs were put on contract, with the last four tagged as replacements for earlier satellites reaching the end of their service life. Block IIRs replaced older Block II/IIAs as they wear out. Block IIF fourth generation satellites were planned to begin flying in 2005.

The Joint Program Office Advanced Plans Branch is actively studying the opportunity to improve accuracy, availability, integrity, and survivability to meet emerging military and civil needs through 2030. The next block of satellites, called GPS III, would continue to deliver the new civil signals and improved military codes that were initiated on the GPS IIR-M and IIF programs. The first launch of research and development GPS III satellites was not expected before 2010.

Navstar continues to perform as the world's premier positioning and navigation systems. Endeavors such as mapping, aerial refueling, rendezvous operations, geodetic surveying, and search and rescue operations have all benefited greatly from GPS's accuracy.

Using lessons learned from Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm, GPS User Equipment is being integrated into nearly all facets of modern warfare. Forward air controllers, pilots, tank drivers, and ground troops all use GPS to help ensure victory on the battlefield. GPS User Equipment consists of the receivers that use the signal from GPS satellites to compute position, time, and velocity primarily for military users. GPS receivers are integrated into every type of system used by the DoD: aircraft, spacecraft, munitions, ground vehicles and ships.

Stand-alone, hand-held receivers for individual use are also widespread among all branches of the Department. These receivers provide real-time situational awareness for the warfighter much more quickly and accurately than previous, conventional methods. GPS-guided munitions showcase this increased capability and are delivered with unprecedented accuracy, thus improving crew survivability while decreasing the number of weapons required to achieve military objectives.

Inherent to the future of military search and rescue is the Combat Survivor Evader Locator (CSEL). The CSEL system is a worldwide architecture of UHF ground stations, Joint Search and Rescue C2 systems and will include 46,000 robust handheld radios. The radios communicate through military, national and civil satellites for use by joint-service aircrews, including special operations. Designed to take the "search" out of "search and rescue," CSEL acquires a precise GPS derived location and communicates directly with rescue forces and, perhaps just as important, communicates to the survivor/evader that rescue is imminent.

As a service to GPS users, the Department of Transportation has established the "Navigation Information Service" (formerly "GPS Information Service") as a point of contact for civil GPS users.

GPS Development

In the late 1950's, scientists at John Hopkins University developed a way to use radio signals originating from a satellite in space to provide accurate position updates to navigation equipment located on the US Navy's ships and submarines. By the mid-1960's, the Air Force initiated a program consisting of several satellites with very accurate clocks onboard that could give off timing signals of their location in space which would accurately determine the position of a vehicle moving on land or in the air. In 1973, the Navy and the Air Force programs combined to form the Navigation Technology Program, which later evolved into the Navstar Global Positioning System (GPS) in operation today.

Navstar GPS became the world's premier position, navigation and timing information service. Civilian users around the globe rely upon Navstar GPS as well. In fact, the system serves millions of civil users with over a 1.4 million handheld and vehicle-mounted GPS receivers having been produced each year since 1997. The rapidly growing GPS market, including equipment and applications, reached $6.2 billion in 2000 and was expected to surpass $50 billion by 2010.

The fundamental concept of GPS is to use simultaneous distance measurements from four satellites to compute the position and time of any receiver on or above the Earth's surface. The GPS satellites broadcast signals on two different frequencies so that sophisticated user receivers can correct for distortion effects due to the ionosphere, a layer of the atmosphere several hundred miles above the Earth. It takes between 65 and 85 milliseconds for a signal to travel from a GPS satellite to a receiver on the surface of the Earth. The signals are so accurate that time can be figured to much less than a millionth of a second, velocity can be figured to within a fraction of a km per hour, and location can be figured to within a few meters. Typical horizontal positioning accuracy for military users is 7 to 10 meters. Prior to the mid-1990's a purposely 'degraded signal' was provided for civilian users, limiting their accuracy to 70 to 100 meters. This was eliminated by order of President Clinton as it became obvious that civilian and commercial users had many unimagined uses for precise location and timing information as well.

Each Block II or IIA satellite has two cesium atomic clocks and two rubidium atomic clocks, while each Block IIR has three rubidium atomic clocks. The stability of these clocks is estimated to be approximately 1 second per 300,000 years. Only one clock is in use on each satellite at a time. The others are backups.

The cost to the Air Force in 1973 2000 to develop and procure the GPS satellites (not including military user equipment or launch costs) was approximately $5.6 billion in 'Year 2000' dollars. The approximate annual cost to operate and maintain the constellation, including research and development and procurement of new satellites, is $750 million.

The GPS worldwide satellite network consists of six monitor stations and four ground antenna stations. The monitor stations (located at Ascension Island, Cape Canaveral, Colorado Springs, Diego Garcia, Kwajalein and Hawaii) use specially-designed GPS receivers to passively track the navigation signals of all of the satellites. Data from the monitor stations is continually sent to the GPS Master Control Station (MCS), located at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado, for processing. The MCS computes precise, updated information on the satellites' orbits and clock status every 15 minutes, 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Updated navigation information is sent from the MCS to the ground antenna stations (located at Ascension Island, Cape Canaveral, Diego Garcia and Kwajalein) and then to the satellites. These "uploads" are done once or twice per day for each satellite. This is sufficient to maintain the high accuracy of the GPS constellation.

By the year 2000 civil users outnumber military users by 100 to 1 and the ratio was increasing. The Compound Annual Growth Rate of the GPS market was growing by approximately 22%.

GPS satellites broadcast on two links to users: L1 and L2. L1 is transmitted at a frequency of 1575.42 MHz, and carries both a Coarse/Acquisition (C/A) ranging code and a Precise (P(Y)) ranging code. L2 is transmitted at a frequency of 1227.6 MHz and carries only the P(Y) code. Only the C/A code on L1 was originally available to all users. The military users have access to both the C/A code on L1 and the P(Y) code on L1 and L2. To access GPS for general use, a civilian user may purchase a hand-held or vehicle-mounted GPS receiver. The civil signal is free to all users worldwide. No subscription, license, fee or registration is required.

The future of plans for GPS included increased power and accuracy, as well as increased civil navigation safety with the addition of a new civil signal on the L2 link and a new civil-only signal on a new link, L5, to be broadcast at 1176.45 MHz. A new military-only signal (M-code) on the L1 and L2 links will be fully operational in 2010. It will have increased power and reduced vulnerability to signal jamming.


More at: Navstar.

Subtopics

GPS Block 1 American navigation satellite. GPS Block 1 prototype satellites formed the GPS Demonstration system and were followed by the Block 2 operational system.

GPS Block 2 and 2A American navigation satellite. The Navstar GPS constellation worked in concert with ground receivers to give precise location information to military and civilian users anywhere in the world.

GPS Block 2F American navigation satellite. Block IIF satellites were the fourth generation of the Navstar satellite, launched from 2010.05.28.

GPS Block 3 American navigation satellite. Study 2010. GPS III, as planned in 2003, would be the fifth generation of Navstar satellites. They would continue to deliver the new civil signals and improved military codes initiated on the GPS IIR-M and IIF programs.

Family: Navigation. Country: USA. Spacecraft: Timation, NTS, GPS Block 1, GPS Block 2 and 2A, SEDS, PMG, GPS Block 2R. Launch Vehicles: Atlas F, Thor SLV-2 Agena D, Thorad SLV-2G Agena D, Atlas F/PTS, Atlas F/SVS, Atlas E/SVS, Atlas E/SGS-2, Delta 6925, Delta 7925, Delta 7925-9.5. Launch Sites: Cape Canaveral, Vandenberg. Agency: NRL, USN, USAF, Seal Beach, MDAC, MDSSC, Valley Forge, Lo. Bibliography: 9278, 12875.

1967 May 31 - . 09:30 GMT - . Launch Site: Vandenberg. Launch Complex: Vandenberg SLC2W. LV Family: Thor. Launch Vehicle: Thor SLV-2 Agena D.
1968 Mar - .
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1969 September 30 - . 13:40 GMT - . Launch Site: Vandenberg. Launch Complex: Vandenberg SLC1W. LV Family: Thor. Launch Vehicle: Thorad SLV-2G Agena D.
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1974 July 14 - . 05:17 GMT - . Launch Site: Vandenberg. Launch Complex: Vandenberg SLC3W. LV Family: Atlas. Launch Vehicle: Atlas F/PTS.
1974 October 23 - .
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1977 February 17 - . Launch Site: , Vandenberg.
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1977 April 15 - . Launch Site: , Vandenberg.
1977 April 30 - . Launch Site: , Vandenberg.
1977 June 23 - . 09:16 GMT - . Launch Site: Vandenberg. Launch Complex: Vandenberg SLC3W. LV Family: Atlas. Launch Vehicle: Atlas F/SVS.
1977 July 18 - . Launch Site: , Vandenberg.
1977 August 15 - .
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1978 February 22 - . 23:44 GMT - . Launch Site: Vandenberg. Launch Complex: Vandenberg SLC3E. LV Family: Atlas. Launch Vehicle: Atlas F/SVS.
1978 April 25 - .
1978 April 26 - .
1978 May 13 - . 10:34 GMT - . Launch Site: Vandenberg. Launch Complex: Vandenberg SLC3E. LV Family: Atlas. Launch Vehicle: Atlas F/SVS.
1978 October 7 - . 00:28 GMT - . Launch Site: Vandenberg. Launch Complex: Vandenberg SLC3E. LV Family: Atlas. Launch Vehicle: Atlas F/SVS.
1978 December 11 - . 03:59 GMT - . Launch Site: Vandenberg. Launch Complex: Vandenberg SLC3E. LV Family: Atlas. Launch Vehicle: Atlas F/SVS.
1978 December 12 - . LV Family: Atlas. Launch Vehicle: Atlas F.
1978 December 21 - .
1979 June 5 - .
1979 June 14 - . LV Family: Atlas.
1979 July 20 - .
1980 February 9 - . 23:08 GMT - . Launch Site: Vandenberg. Launch Complex: Vandenberg SLC3E. LV Family: Atlas. Launch Vehicle: Atlas F/SVS.
1980 April 26 - . 22:00 GMT - . Launch Site: Vandenberg. Launch Complex: Vandenberg SLC3E. LV Family: Atlas. Launch Vehicle: Atlas F/SVS.
1981 December 19 - . 01:10 GMT - . Launch Site: Vandenberg. Launch Complex: Vandenberg SLC3E. LV Family: Atlas. Launch Vehicle: Atlas E/SVS. FAILURE: Failure.. Failed Stage: 1.
1983 July 14 - . 10:21 GMT - . Launch Site: Vandenberg. Launch Complex: Vandenberg SLC3W. LV Family: Atlas. Launch Vehicle: Atlas E/SGS-2.
1984 January 1 - .
1984 June 13 - . 11:37 GMT - . Launch Site: Vandenberg. Launch Complex: Vandenberg SLC3W. LV Family: Atlas. Launch Vehicle: Atlas E/SGS-2.
1984 September 8 - . 21:41 GMT - . Launch Site: Vandenberg. Launch Complex: Vandenberg SLC3W. LV Family: Atlas. Launch Vehicle: Atlas E/SGS-2.
1985 October 9 - . 02:53 GMT - . Launch Site: Vandenberg. Launch Complex: Vandenberg SLC3W. LV Family: Atlas. Launch Vehicle: Atlas E/SGS-2.
1989 February 14 - . 18:30 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17A. LV Family: Thor. Launch Vehicle: Delta 6925.
1989 June 10 - . 22:19 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17A. LV Family: Thor. Launch Vehicle: Delta 6925.
1989 August 18 - . 05:58 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17A. LV Family: Thor. Launch Vehicle: Delta 6925.
1989 October 21 - . 09:31 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17A. LV Family: Thor. Launch Vehicle: Delta 6925.
1989 December 11 - . 18:10 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17B. LV Family: Thor. Launch Vehicle: Delta 6925.
1990 January 24 - . 22:55 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17A. LV Family: Thor. Launch Vehicle: Delta 6925.
1990 March 26 - . 02:45 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17A. LV Family: Thor. Launch Vehicle: Delta 6925.
1990 August 2 - . 05:39 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17A. LV Family: Thor. Launch Vehicle: Delta 6925.
1990 October 1 - . 21:56 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17A. LV Family: Thor. Launch Vehicle: Delta 6925.
1990 November 26 - . 21:39 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17A. LV Family: Thor. Launch Vehicle: Delta 7925.
1991 July 4 - . 02:32 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17A. LV Family: Thor. Launch Vehicle: Delta 7925.
1992 February 23 - . 22:29 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17B. LV Family: Thor. Launch Vehicle: Delta 7925.
1992 April 10 - . 03:20 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17B. LV Family: Thor. Launch Vehicle: Delta 7925.
1992 July 7 - . 09:20 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17B. LV Family: Thor. Launch Vehicle: Delta 7925.
1992 September 9 - . 08:57 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17A. LV Family: Thor. Launch Vehicle: Delta 7925.
1992 November 22 - . 23:54 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17A. LV Family: Thor. Launch Vehicle: Delta 7925.
1992 December 18 - . 22:16 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17B. LV Family: Thor. Launch Vehicle: Delta 7925.
1993 February 3 - . 02:55 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17A. LV Family: Thor. Launch Vehicle: Delta 7925.
1993 March 30 - . 03:09 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17A. LV Family: Thor. Launch Vehicle: Delta 7925.
1993 May 13 - . 00:07 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17A. LV Family: Thor. Launch Vehicle: Delta 7925.
1993 June 26 - . 13:27 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17A. LV Family: Thor. Launch Vehicle: Delta 7925.
1993 August 30 - . 12:38 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17B. LV Family: Thor. Launch Vehicle: Delta 7925.
1993 October 26 - . 17:04 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17B. LV Family: Thor. Launch Vehicle: Delta 7925.
1994 March 10 - . 03:40 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17A. LV Family: Thor. Launch Vehicle: Delta 7925.
1996 March 28 - . 00:21 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17B. LV Family: Thor. Launch Vehicle: Delta 7925.
1996 July 16 - . 00:50 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17A. LV Family: Thor. Launch Vehicle: Delta 7925.
1996 September 12 - . 08:49 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17A. LV Family: Thor. Launch Vehicle: Delta 7925.
1997 January 17 - . 16:28 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17A. LV Family: Thor. Launch Vehicle: Delta 7925. FAILURE: T+12 sec GEM strap-on number 2 structural failure.. Failed Stage: 0.
1997 July 23 - . 03:43 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17A. LV Family: Thor. Launch Vehicle: Delta 7925.
1997 November 6 - . 00:30 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17A. LV Family: Thor. Launch Vehicle: Delta 7925.
1999 October 7 - . 12:51 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17A. Launch Pad: SLC17A. LV Family: Thor. Launch Vehicle: Delta 7925-9.5.
2000 May 11 - . 01:48 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17A. Launch Pad: SLC17A. LV Family: Thor. Launch Vehicle: Delta 7925-9.5.
2000 July 16 - . 09:17 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17A. Launch Pad: SLC17A. LV Family: Thor. Launch Vehicle: Delta 7925-9.5.
2000 November 10 - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17A. Launch Pad: SLC17A. LV Family: Thor. Launch Vehicle: Delta 7925-9.5.
2001 January 30 - . 07:55 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17A. Launch Pad: SLC17A. LV Family: Thor. Launch Vehicle: Delta 7925-9.5.
2003 January 29 - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17B. Launch Pad: SLC17B. LV Family: Thor. Launch Vehicle: Delta 7925-9.5.
2003 March 31 - . 22:09 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17A. Launch Pad: SLC17A. LV Family: Thor. Launch Vehicle: Delta 7925-9.5.
2003 December 21 - . 08:05 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17A. Launch Pad: SLC17A. LV Family: Thor. Launch Vehicle: Delta 7925-9.5.
2004 March 20 - . 17:53 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17B. Launch Pad: SLC17B. LV Family: Thor. Launch Vehicle: Delta 7925-9.5.
2004 June 23 - . 22:54 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17B. Launch Pad: SLC17B. LV Family: Thor. Launch Vehicle: Delta 7925-9.5.
2004 November 6 - . 05:39 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17B. Launch Pad: SLC17B. LV Family: Thor. Launch Vehicle: Delta 7925-9.5.
2005 September 26 - . 03:37 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17A. Launch Pad: SLC17A. LV Family: Thor. Launch Vehicle: Delta 7925-9.5.
2006 September 25 - . 18:50 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17A. Launch Pad: SLC17A. LV Family: Thor. Launch Vehicle: Delta 7925-9.5.
2006 November 17 - . 19:12 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17A. Launch Pad: SLC17A. LV Family: Thor. Launch Vehicle: Delta 7925-9.5.
2007 October 17 - . 12:23 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17A. Launch Pad: SLC17A. LV Family: Thor. Launch Vehicle: Delta 7925-9.5.
2007 December 20 - . 20:04 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17A. Launch Pad: SLC17A. LV Family: Thor. Launch Vehicle: Delta 7925-9.5.
2010 May 28 - . 03:00 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC37B. Launch Pad: SLC37B. LV Family: Delta IV. Launch Vehicle: Delta 4M+(4,2).
2011 July 16 - . 06:41 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC37B. Launch Pad: SLC37B. LV Family: Delta IV. Launch Vehicle: Delta 4M+(4,2).
2012 October 4 - . 00:00 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC37B. Launch Pad: SLC37B. LV Family: Delta IV. Launch Vehicle: Delta 4M+(4,2).
2013 May 15 - . 21:38 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC41. Launch Pad: SLC41. LV Family: Atlas V. Launch Vehicle: Atlas V 401.
2014 February 21 - . 01:59 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17B. Launch Pad: SLC37B. LV Family: Delta IV. Launch Vehicle: Delta 4M+(4,2).
2014 May 17 - . 00:03 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC17B. Launch Pad: SLC37B. LV Family: Delta IV. Launch Vehicle: Delta 4M+(4,2).
2014 August 2 - . 03:23 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC41. Launch Pad: SLC41. LV Family: Atlas V. Launch Vehicle: Atlas V 401.
2014 October 29 - . 17:21 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC41. Launch Pad: Cape Canaveral SLC41. LV Family: Atlas V. Launch Vehicle: Atlas V 401.
2015 March 25 - . 18:36 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC37B. Launch Pad: Cape Canaveral SLC37. LV Family: Delta IV. Launch Vehicle: Delta 4M+(4,2).
2015 July 15 - . 15:36 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC41. LV Family: Atlas V. Launch Vehicle: Atlas V 401.
2015 October 31 - . 16:13 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC41. LV Family: Atlas V. Launch Vehicle: Atlas V 401.
2016 February 5 - . 13:38 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC41. Launch Pad: Cape Canaveral SLC41. LV Family: Atlas V. Launch Vehicle: Atlas V 401.

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