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England, Anthony Wayne
England
England
Credit: www.spacefacts.de
American geophysicist mission specialist astronaut 1967-1988.

Status: Inactive; Active 1967-1988. Born: 1942-05-15. Spaceflights: 1 . Total time in space: 7.95 days. Birth Place: Indianapolis, Indiana.

Grew up in West Fargo, North Dakota. Educated MIT.

Official NASA Biography as of June 2016:Anthony W. England (Ph.D.)
NASA Astronaut (former)

PERSONAL DATA: Born May 15, 1942, in Indianapolis, Indiana, but his hometown is West Fargo, North Dakota. Married to the former Kathleen Ann Kreutz. They have two daughters. Recreational interests include sailing and amateur radio.

EDUCATION: Attended primary school in Indianapolis, Indiana, and graduated from high school in North Dakota; received bachelor and master of science degrees in Geology from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1965, and a doctor of philosophy in Geophysics from MIT in 1970.

SPECIAL HONORS: Presented the Johnson Space Center Superior Achievement Award (1970). Awarded a NASA Outstanding Scientific Achievement Medal (1973), the U.S. Antarctic Medal (1979), the NASA Space Flight Medal (1985), the American Astronomical Society Space Flight Award (1986), the NASA Exceptional Service Medal (1988), the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Exceptional Service Award for 1994, and the College of Engineering Excellence in Faculty Service Award for 1995. He is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE).

EXPERIENCE: He was a graduate fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology for the 3 years immediately preceding his first assignment to NASA. He helped develop and use radars to probe the Moon on Apollo 17 and glaciers in Washington State and Alaska, and participated in and led field parties during two seasons in Antarctica. He was Deputy Chief of the Office of Geochemistry and Geophysics for the U.S. Geological Survey, and Associated Editor for the Journal of Geophysical Research. He served on the National Academy's Space Studies Board, and on several Federal Committees concerned with Antarctic policy, nuclear waste containment, and Federal Science and Technology. Dr. England is currently Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Professor of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Science, and Director of the Center for Spatial Analysis at the University of Michigan.

He has logged over 3,000 hours of flying time.

NASA EXPERIENCE: Dr. England was selected as a scientist-astronaut by NASA in August 1967. He subsequently completed the initial academic training and a 53-week course in flight training at Laughlin Air Force Base, Texas, and served as a support crewman for the Apollo 13 and 16 flights. He left NASA for the U.S. Geological Survey in 1972.

Dr. England returned to the Johnson Space Center in 1979 as a senior scientist-astronaut (mission specialist), was assigned to the operation mission development group of the astronaut office, and eventually managed that group. In 1985 he flew on STS-51F Spacelab-2 in 1985 and has logged 188 hours in space. From May 1986 to May 1987 he served as a Program Scientist for Space Station. From June 1987 to December 1987 he taught Remote Sensing Geophysics at Rice University. Dr. England retired from NASA in 1988.

SPACE FLIGHT EXPERIENCE: STS-51F Spacelab-2, carrying a 7-man crew, was launched from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, on July 29, 1985. This mission was the first pallet-only Spacelab mission and the first mission to operate the Spacelab Instrument Pointing System (IPS). It carried 13 major experiments of which 7 were in the field of astronomy and solar physics, 3 were for studies of the Earth's ionosphere, 2 were life science experiments, and 1 studied the properties of superfluid helium. During the flight, Dr. England was responsible for activating and operating the Spacelab systems, operating the Instrument Pointing System (IPS), and the Remote Manipulator System (RMS), assisting with experiment operations, and performing a contingency EVA had one been necessary. After 126 orbits of the earth, STS 51-F Challenger landed at Edwards Air Force Base, California, on August 6, 1985.

AUGUST 1999

This is the only version available from NASA. Updates must be sought from the above named individual.


Official NASA Biography

NAME: Anthony W. England (Ph.D.)

NASA Astronaut

BIRTHPLACE AND DATE: Born May 15, 1942, in Indianapolis, Indiana; but his hometown is West Fargo, North Dakota. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Herman U. England, reside in Detroit Lakes, Minnesota.

PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION: Brown hair; blue eyes; height: 5 feet 10 inches; weight: l70 pounds.

EDUCATION: Attended primary school in Indianapolis, Indiana, and graduated from high school in North Dakota; received bachelor and master of science degrees in Geology from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1965, and a doctor of philosophy degree in Geophysics from MIT in 1970.

MARITAL STATUS: Married to the former Kathleen Ann Kreutz, who is the daughter of Mr. Howard B. Kreutz of Perham, Minnesota. Her mother, Mrs. Constance E. Kreutz, is deceased.

CHILDREN: Heidi Lynd, November 5, 1968; and Heather Anne, May 15, 1970.

RECREATIONAL INTERESTS: He enjoys sailing and amateur radio.

ORGANIZATIONS: Member of the American Geophysical Union, the Society of Exploration Geophysicists, and Sigma XI.

SPECIAL HONORS: Presented the Johnson Space Center Superior Achievement Award (1970). Winner of a National Science Foundation Fellowship. Awarded a NASA Outstanding Scientific Achievement Medal (1973), the U.S. Antarctic Medal (1979), and the NASA Space Flight Medal (1985), and the American Astronomical Society Space Flight Award (1986).

EXPERIENCE: He was a graduate fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology for the 3 years immediately preceding his assignment to NASA. He performed heat flow measurements throughout the southwest; took part in geomagnetic studies in Montana; performed radar sounding studies of glaciers in Washington State, and Alaska; performed microwave airborne research in geothermal areas of the Western United States; and participated in and led field parties during two seasons in Antarctica. He was Deputy Chief of the Office of Geochemistry and Geophysics for the U.S. Geological Survey, and was Associate Editor for the Journal of Geophysical Research. He served on the National Academy's Earth Science Panel of the Space Science Board, and on several Federal Committees concerned with Antarctic policy, nuclear waste containment, and Federal Science and Technology.

He has logged over 3,000 hours in flying time.

NASA EXPERIENCE: Dr. England was selected as a scientist-astronaut by NASA in August 1967. He subsequently completed the initial academic training and a 53-week course in flight training at Laughlin Air Force Base, Texas, and served as a support crewman for the Apollo 13 and 16 flights.

From August 1972 to June 1979, England was a research geophysicist with the U. S. Geological Survey.

In 1979 he returned to the Johnson Space Center as a senior scientist-astronaut (mission specialist), and was assigned to the operation mission development group of the astronaut office, and, eventually managed that group.

Dr. England was a mission specialist on the Spacelab-2 mission (STS 51-F) which launched from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, on July 29, 1985. He was accompanied by Col. Charles G. Fullerton (spacecraft commander), Col. Roy D. Bridges (pilot), fellow mission specialists, Dr's. Karl G. Henize, and F. Story Musgrave, as well as two payload specialists, Dr's. Loren Acton, and John-David Bartoe. This mission was the first pallet-only Spacelab mission and the first mission to operate the Spacelab Instrument Pointing System (IPS). It carried 13 major experiments of which 7 were in the field of astronomy and solar physics, 3 were for studies of the Earth's ionosphere, 2 were life science experiments, and 1 studied the properties of superfluid helium. During the mission Dr. England was responsible for activating and operating the Spacelab systems, operating the Instrument Pointing System (IPS), and the Remote Manipulator System (RMS), assisting with experiment operations, and performing a contingency EVA had one been necessary. After 126 orbits of the Earth, STS 51-F Challenger landed at Edwards Air Force Base, California, on August 6, 1985. With the completion of this flight England has logged 188 hours in space.

Currently Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

NOVEMBER, 1989


More at: England.

Family: Mission Specialist Astronaut, NASA Group 6 - 1967. Country: USA. Flights: Apollo 19, STS-51-F. Projects: STS. Bibliography: 12, 5355.
Photo Gallery

STS-51-FSTS-51-F
Kathleen England watches her image transmitted to shuttle
Credit: NASA


STS-51-FSTS-51-F
Astronaut Anthony W. England with soft drink in middeck area near galley
Credit: NASA



1942 May 15 - .
  • Birth of Dr Anthony Wayne 'Tony' England - . Nation: USA. Related Persons: England. American geophysicist mission specialist astronaut. Flew on STS-51-F..

1967 August 4 - .
  • NASA Astronaut Training Group 6 selected. - . Nation: USA. Related Persons: Allen, Chapman, England, Henize, Holmquest, Lenoir, Llewellyn, Musgrave, O Leary, Parker, Thornton, Bill.

    The group was selected to provide additional scientist-astronauts for Apollo lunar landing and earth-orbit space station missions.. Qualifications: Doctorate in natural sciences, medicine, or engineering. Under 35 years old, under 183 cm height, excellent health. US citizen or willing to become a naturalized citizen.. In response to the poor result of the first scientist-astronaut selection, NASA went ahead with a second round of selections. 923 people applied, of which 69 selected by the National Academy of Sciences for NASA physical and mental evaluation. By the time the new astronauts reported, ambitious Apollo Applications plans had been scrapped, leading to their nickname 'The Excess Eleven'. Seven stayed on through the 1970's and finally got to fly aboard the space shuttle.


1973 December - .
1985 July 29 - . 21:00 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC39A. Launch Platform: MLP2. LV Family: Shuttle. Launch Vehicle: Space Shuttle.
  • STS-51-F - . Call Sign: Challenger. Crew: Acton, Bartoe, Bridges, England, Fullerton, Henize, Musgrave. Payload: Challenger F08 / PDP / Spacelab 2 PLT. Mass: 15,603 kg (34,398 lb). Nation: USA. Related Persons: Acton, Bartoe, Bridges, England, Fullerton, Henize, Musgrave. Agency: NASA Houston. Program: STS. Class: Manned. Type: Manned spaceplane. Flight: STS-51-F. Spacecraft Bus: Shuttle. Spacecraft: Challenger. Duration: 7.95 days. Decay Date: 1985-08-06 . USAF Sat Cat: 15925 . COSPAR: 1985-063A. Apogee: 337 km (209 mi). Perigee: 203 km (126 mi). Inclination: 49.5000 deg. Period: 89.90 min.

    Manned seven crew. At 5 minutes, 45 seconds into ascent the number one engine shut down prematurely due to a a sensor problem and an abort to orbit was declared. Despite the anomaly the mission continued. Launched PDP; carried Spacelab 2. Payloads: Spacelab-2 with 13 experiments, Shuttle Amateur Radio Experiment (SAREX), Protein Crystal Growth (PCG). The flight crew was divided into a red and blue team. Each team worked 12-hour shifts for 24-hour-a-day operation.


1985 August 6 - .

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