Encyclopedia Astronautica
Sparoair II-1


Solid propellant rocket stage. Loaded mass 100 kg. Thrust 35.00 kN.

AKA: Mk 6 Mod 3.
Status: Retired 1974.
Gross mass: 100 kg (220 lb).
Height: 1.30 m (4.20 ft).
Diameter: 0.20 m (0.65 ft).
Thrust: 35.00 kN (7,868 lbf).
Burn time: 1.80 s.
Number: 57 .

More... - Chronology...


Associated Countries
Associated Engines
Associated Launch Vehicles
  • Aerobee 300 American sounding rocket. The Aerobee 300, also called the Sparrowbee, consisted of an Aerobee 150 or Aerobee 180 lower stage with a 20 cm diameter Sparrow rocket as an upper stage. The Sparrow would ignite at 35 km altitude at 53 seconds into the flight, and boost the payload to 10,000 kph, allowing it to coast up to 420 km apogee. The rocket was designed for studies of the sun above the atmosphere and was only fired from Fort Churchill (the White Sands range was too small to cover the possible impact points of the high-altitude rocket). More...
  • Sparoair I American sounding rocket. Three stage vehicle consisting of 1 x F3H Cougar + 1 x Sparrow + 1 x Sparrow More...
  • Aerobee 300A American sounding rocket. Aerobee 300A used a four-fin Aerobee 150A second stage rather than the older three-fin 150. More...
  • Sparoair II American sounding rocket. Three stage vehicle consisting of 1 x F3H Cougar + 1 x Sparrow + 1 x Sparrow More...
  • Sparoair III American sounding rocket. Three stage vehicle consisting of 1 x F4B Phantom + 1 x Sparrow + 1 x 22.6KS1245 More...

Associated Propellants
  • Solid Solid propellants have the fuel and oxidiser embedded in a rubbery matrix. They were developed to a high degree of perfection in the United States in the 1950's and 1960's. In Russia, development was slower, due to a lack of technical leadership in the area and rail handling problems. Solid propellants have the fuel and oxidiser embedded in a rubbery matrix. They were developed to a high degree of perfection in the United States in the 1950's and 1960's. In Russia, development was slower, due to a lack of technical leadership in the area and rail handling problems. More...

Home - Browse - Contact
© / Conditions for Use