Encyclopedia Astronautica
Vostok 11A510


Russian orbital launch vehicle. Version of R-7 launch vehicle with Vostok second stage and unknown third stage used only twice to launch prototype RORSATs. These satellites were originally to have been launched on the cancelled UR-200 launcher, and operational satellites used Tsyklon-2 launchers.

LEO Payload: 4,500 kg (9,900 lb) to a 200 km orbit at 65.00 degrees.

Stage Data - Vostok 11A510

  • Stage 0. 4 x Soyuz 11A511-0. Gross Mass: 43,000 kg (94,000 lb). Empty Mass: 3,550 kg (7,820 lb). Thrust (vac): 994.300 kN (223,528 lbf). Isp: 314 sec. Burn time: 118 sec. Isp(sl): 257 sec. Diameter: 2.68 m (8.79 ft). Span: 2.68 m (8.79 ft). Length: 19.60 m (64.30 ft). Propellants: Lox/Kerosene. No Engines: 1. Engine: RD-107-11D511. Other designations: 11S59 Blocks A,B,V,G. Status: In Production.
  • Stage 1. 1 x Soyuz 11A511-1. Gross Mass: 100,500 kg (221,500 lb). Empty Mass: 6,500 kg (14,300 lb). Thrust (vac): 977.700 kN (219,796 lbf). Isp: 315 sec. Burn time: 292 sec. Isp(sl): 252 sec. Diameter: 2.95 m (9.67 ft). Span: 2.95 m (9.67 ft). Length: 27.80 m (91.20 ft). Propellants: Lox/Kerosene. No Engines: 1. Engine: RD-108-11D512. Other designations: 11S59 Block D. Status: In Production.
  • Stage 2. 1 x Vostok 8A92-2. Gross Mass: 7,775 kg (17,140 lb). Empty Mass: 1,440 kg (3,170 lb). Thrust (vac): 54.900 kN (12,342 lbf). Isp: 326 sec. Burn time: 369 sec. Isp(sl): 0.0000 sec. Diameter: 2.56 m (8.39 ft). Span: 2.56 m (8.39 ft). Length: 2.84 m (9.31 ft). Propellants: Lox/Kerosene. No Engines: 1. Engine: RD-0109. Status: Out of Production.
  • Stage 3. 1 x Tsyklon 2-3. Gross Mass: 3,200 kg (7,000 lb). Empty Mass: 400 kg (880 lb). Thrust (vac): 77.960 kN (17,526 lbf). Isp: 317 sec. Burn time: 112 sec. Diameter: 2.00 m (6.50 ft). Span: 2.00 m (6.50 ft). Length: 2.50 m (8.20 ft). Propellants: N2O4/UDMH. No Engines: 1. Engine: RD-861. Status: In Production. Comments: Integral portion of payload.

AKA: Soyuz 11A510; SL-5; 11A510; A.
Status: Retired 1966.
Gross mass: 275,000 kg (606,000 lb).
Payload: 4,500 kg (9,900 lb).
Height: 31.00 m (101.00 ft).
Diameter: 10.30 m (33.70 ft).
Thrust: 4,037.70 kN (907,711 lbf).
Apogee: 200 km (120 mi).
First Launch: 1965.12.27.
Last Launch: 1966.07.20.
Number: 2 .

More... - Chronology...


Associated Countries
Associated Spacecraft
  • US-A Russian military naval surveillance radar satellite. 38 launches, 1965.12.28 (Cosmos 102) to 1988.03.14 (Cosmos 1932). The US-A (later known as RLS) was a nuclear powered RORSAT (Radar Ocean Reconnaissance Satellite). More...

See also
  • R-7 The world's first ICBM became the most often used and most reliable launch vehicle in history. The original core+four strap-on booster missile had a small third stage added to produce the Vostok launch vehicle, with a payload of 5 metric tons. Addition of a larger third stage produced the Voskhod/Soyuz vehicle, with a payload over 6 metric tons. Using this with a fourth stage, the resulting Molniya booster placed communications satellites and early lunar and planetary probes in higher energy trajectories. By the year 2000 over 1,628 had been launched with an unmatched success rate of 97.5% for production models. Improved models providing commercial launch services for international customers entered service in the new millenium, and a new launch pad at Kourou was to be inaugurated in 2011. It appeared that the R-7 could easily still be in service 70 years after its first launch. More...

Associated Manufacturers and Agencies
  • Korolev Russian manufacturer of rockets, spacecraft, and rocket engines. Korolev Design Bureau, Kaliningrad, Russia. More...

Associated Programs
  • RORSAT Soviet military nuclear-reactor powered radar naval reconnaissance satellite network. More...

Associated Launch Sites
  • Baikonur Russia's largest cosmodrome, the only one used for manned launches and with facilities for the larger Proton, N1, and Energia launch vehicles. The spaceport ended up on foreign soil after the break-up of Soviet Union. The official designations NIIP-5 and GIK-5 are used in official Soviet histories. It was also universally referred to as Tyuratam by both Soviet military staff and engineers, and the US intelligence agencies. Since the dissolution of the Soviet Union the Russian Federation has insisted on continued use of the old Soviet 'public' name of Baikonur. In its Kazakh (Kazak) version this is rendered Baykonur. More...

Associated Stages
  • Soyuz 11A511-0 Lox/Kerosene propellant rocket stage. Loaded/empty mass 43,000/3,550 kg. Thrust 994.30 kN. Vacuum specific impulse 314 seconds. More...
  • Soyuz 11A511-1 Lox/Kerosene propellant rocket stage. Loaded/empty mass 100,500/6,500 kg. Thrust 977.70 kN. Vacuum specific impulse 315 seconds. More...
  • Tsyklon 2-3 N2O4/UDMH propellant rocket stage. Loaded/empty mass 3,200/400 kg. Thrust 77.96 kN. Vacuum specific impulse 317 seconds. Integral portion of payload. More...
  • Vostok 8A92-2 Lox/Kerosene propellant rocket stage. Loaded/empty mass 7,775/1,440 kg. Thrust 54.90 kN. Vacuum specific impulse 326 seconds. More...

Vostok 11A510 Chronology


1965 December 27 - . 22:19 GMT - . Launch Site: Baikonur. Launch Complex: Baikonur LC31. LV Family: R-7. Launch Vehicle: Vostok 11A510. LV Configuration: Soyuz 11A510 G15000-01.
  • Cosmos 102 - . Mass: 3,800 kg (8,300 lb). Nation: USSR. Agency: MOM. Program: RORSAT. Class: Surveillance. Type: Military naval surveillance radar satellite. Spacecraft: US-A. Decay Date: 1966-01-13 . USAF Sat Cat: 1867 . COSPAR: 1965-111A. Apogee: 267 km (165 mi). Perigee: 205 km (127 mi). Inclination: 64.9000 deg. Period: 89.20 min. Summary: Prototype RORSAT hardware using chemical batteries in place of nuclear reactor..

1966 July 20 - . 09:07 GMT - . Launch Site: Baikonur. Launch Complex: Baikonur LC31. LV Family: R-7. Launch Vehicle: Vostok 11A510. LV Configuration: Soyuz 11A510 G15000-02.
  • Cosmos 125 - . Mass: 3,800 kg (8,300 lb). Nation: USSR. Agency: MOM. Program: RORSAT. Class: Surveillance. Type: Military naval surveillance radar satellite. Spacecraft: US-A. Decay Date: 1966-08-02 . USAF Sat Cat: 2351 . COSPAR: 1966-067A. Apogee: 260 km (160 mi). Perigee: 204 km (126 mi). Inclination: 64.9000 deg. Period: 89.10 min. Summary: Prototype RORSAT hardware using chemical batteries in place of nuclear reactor. Lost on the 52nd revolution as a result of a possible failure in the chemical power units placed on board instead of the nuclear BES-5..

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