Encyclopedia Astronautica
UR-100N



urfam.jpg
Universal Rockets
Chelomei's Universal Rocket Family. From left to right: UR-100 (three variants) and UR-100N (three variants). UR-200. Original UR-500 configuration, composed of clustered UR-200's. Conventional UR-500 monoblock configuration. Selected UR-500 polyblock configuration. UR-500 two-stage configuration - ICBM version and as flown. UR-500K configuration with LK-1; with Block D upper stage and L1; with Block D upper stage for satellite launch. UR-700.
Credit: © Mark Wade
rokotdwg.gif
Rokot
Credit: © Mark Wade
Russian intercontinental ballistic missile. The UR-100N was designed as a replacement for the UR-100 at the end of its ten year storage life. Although it could be installed in the same silos, it was 50% heavier. The competing design of Yangel, the MR-UR-100, was also put into production when the Soviet hierarchy deadlocked and could not pick one design over the other.

Chief Designer Vladimir Chelomei began development of the UR-100N in 1967 as a replacement for his UR-100, the most widely deployed Soviet ICBM. He conceived of a modernised 8K84M capable of launching six independently-targeted nuclear warheads. Chief Designer Yangel at KB Yuzhnoye was promoting an alternate UR-100 replacement, his MR-UR-100. The competition between the two chief designers led to a drama universally remarked upon in memoirs of Soviet rocketeers. Both design bureaux had powerful supporters in the Soviet leadership, and no consensus could be reached as to which missile to put into production. Chelomei was supported by leadership figures Grechko, Afanasyev, and designers Sergeyev, Barmin, Baryshev and V Kuznetsov. The Yuzhnoye design was supported by Central Committee Secretary Ustinov, head of the VPK Military-Industrial Commission Smirnov, Mozhorin, Tyulin, and designers Glushko, and Pilyugin.

Keldysh headed an expert commission to select a design, but the split within the technical community resulted in a deadlock. Premier Brezhnev finally made the Solomonic but extremely expensive decision at a leadership meeting at Stalin's old dacha at Yalta -- both would be built and deployed.

Decrees authorising full development of the missile and silo were issued on 2 September 1969 and 19 August 1970. The missile was to feature a manoeuvrable post-boost bus for dispensing of warheads and countermeasures on different trajectories; a digital guidance system by V Sergeyev at NII-692; and shock mounting of the missile in the silo to improve survivability and the allow it to ride out an enemy counter-force nuclear attack. The rocket itself was increased in diameter to 2.41 m. The second stage engine was completely 'submerged' in the fuel tank, to allow the maximum missile mass to be packed into the existing UR-100 silos. This nearly tripled payload compared to the original UR-100. Baryshev at TsKBM Filial 2 designed the silo modifications. The new universal missile command point was designed by Krivoshein and Aksyutin at TsKB TM. The miniature nuclear warheads were the product of NII-1011 at Chelyabinsk-70.

Test flights began on 9 April 1973 at Baikonur. The last of 27 test launches were completed in October 1975. During the series tests were made with 1, 4, and 6 warhead configurations. The first regiment became active with the missile at Pervomaisk on 26 April 1975. The missile was formally accepted by the military on 30 December 1975. The first regiment with improved 'super-hardened' silos, able to resist overpressures of up to 450 atmospheres, became operational at Tatischevo on 18 December 1976. By 1979 240 missiles had been deployed. The INS, based on that developed for the R-36M by NPO Kharton, provided an 0.26 km CEP.

In service the missiles received a minor inspection and preventive maintenance visit every three months. A major inspection and maintenance is conducted every three years. The UR-100N was launched a total of 67 times by the year 2000. These included regular service launches to verify the missile's guaranteed life. In November 1994 a missile was launched successfully after 18 years in its storage container. A 10 June 1997 a twenty-year old missile, moved in its container from a silo in Kozelsk, was launched from Baikonur, followed by a 22 year old missile on 7 October 1998. These tests resulted in the missile being certified for 25 years life in 1999, which would allow field use of the UR-100N to 2010. There was every expectation that this could be extended to 30 years.

With the collapse of the Soviet Union, 130 UR-100N's at Khmelnitskiy and Pervomaisk had their warheads removed. The rockets themselves were returned to Russia between 29 August 1996 and February 1999. By September 1998 120 of the Ukrainian silos had been destroyed. The missile remained in service in 160 silos in Kozelsk (70) and Tatishchevo (90).

Failures: 15. Success Rate: 91.07%. First Fail Date: 1972-01-01. Last Fail Date: 2005-10-08. Launch data is: continuing. Standard warhead: 4,350 kg (9,590 lb). Maximum range: 9,650 km (5,990 mi). Number Standard Warheads: 6. Warhead yield: 550 KT. CEP: 0.26 km (0.16 mi). Alternate warhead: 4,300 kg (9,400 lb). Maximum range with alternate warhead: 9,650 km (5,990 mi). Number Alternate Warheads: 1. Alternate warhead yield: 5,000 KT. Alternate warhead CEP: 0.26 km (0.16 mi). Boost Propulsion: Storable liquid rocket. Initial Operational Capability: 1974.

Stage Data - UR-100N

  • Stage 1. 1 x UR-100N Stage 1N. Gross Mass: 77,150 kg (170,080 lb). Empty Mass: 5,695 kg (12,555 lb). Thrust (vac): 1,778.661 kN (399,859 lbf). Isp: 310 sec. Burn time: 121 sec. Isp(sl): 285 sec. Diameter: 2.50 m (8.20 ft). Span: 2.50 m (8.20 ft). Length: 17.20 m (56.40 ft). Propellants: N2O4/UDMH. No Engines: 4. Engine: RD-0232. Status: In Production.
  • Stage 1. 1 x UR-100N Stage 1N. Gross Mass: 77,150 kg (170,080 lb). Empty Mass: 5,695 kg (12,555 lb). Thrust (vac): 1,778.661 kN (399,859 lbf). Isp: 310 sec. Burn time: 121 sec. Isp(sl): 285 sec. Diameter: 2.50 m (8.20 ft). Span: 2.50 m (8.20 ft). Length: 17.20 m (56.40 ft). Propellants: N2O4/UDMH. No Engines: 4. Engine: RD-0232. Status: In Production.
  • Stage 2. 1 x UR-100N Stage 2N. Gross Mass: 12,195 kg (26,885 lb). Empty Mass: 1,485 kg (3,273 lb). Thrust (vac): 214.270 kN (48,170 lbf). Isp: 322 sec. Burn time: 183 sec. Diameter: 2.50 m (8.20 ft). Span: 2.50 m (8.20 ft). Length: 3.90 m (12.70 ft). Propellants: N2O4/UDMH. No Engines: 1. Engine: RD-0235. Status: In Production. Comments: Engine has one main engine and four verniers. Verniers continue to burn for 19 seconds after mainstage shutoff.
  • Stage 2. 1 x UR-100N Stage 2N. Gross Mass: 12,195 kg (26,885 lb). Empty Mass: 1,485 kg (3,273 lb). Thrust (vac): 214.270 kN (48,170 lbf). Isp: 322 sec. Burn time: 183 sec. Diameter: 2.50 m (8.20 ft). Span: 2.50 m (8.20 ft). Length: 3.90 m (12.70 ft). Propellants: N2O4/UDMH. No Engines: 1. Engine: RD-0235. Status: In Production. Comments: Engine has one main engine and four verniers. Verniers continue to burn for 19 seconds after mainstage shutoff.
  • Stage 3. 1 x UR-100N MIRV Bus. Gross Mass: 1,100 kg (2,400 lb). Empty Mass: 725 kg (1,598 lb). Thrust (vac): 4.900 kN (1,102 lbf). Isp: 200 sec. Burn time: 150 sec. Diameter: 2.50 m (8.20 ft). Span: 2.50 m (8.20 ft). Length: 0.50 m (1.64 ft). Propellants: N2O4/UDMH. No Engines: 1. Engine: RD-0237. Status: Out of Production.

AKA: RS-18A; UR-100N; SS-19 Mod 1 and Mod 2; 15A30; Rokot; Stilleto; 15P030.
Status: Active.
Gross mass: 105,600 kg (232,800 lb).
Payload: 4,350 kg (9,590 lb).
Height: 24.00 m (78.00 ft).
Diameter: 2.50 m (8.20 ft).
Span: 2.50 m (8.20 ft).
Thrust: 2,038.00 kN (458,160 lbf).
Apogee: 1,000 km (600 mi).
First Launch: 1972.01.01.
Last Launch: 1984.01.01.
Number: 63 .

More... - Chronology...


Associated Countries
Associated Spacecraft
  • Radio Russian amateur radio communications satellite. 9 launches, 1978.10.26 (Radio Sputnik 1) to 1994.12.26 (Radio-ROSTO RS-15). More...
  • Strela-3 Russian military store-dump communications satellite. Operational, first launch 1985.01.15. Said to have initially been developed for the GRU. More...
  • LM 700 American communications satellite. 98 launches, 1997.05.05 (Iridium 8) to 2002.06.20 (Iridium SV98 ). The LM 700 had its first use in the Iridium system, a commercial communications network comprised of a minimum of 66 LEO spacecraft. More...
  • Simsat Russian technology satellite. 2 launched, 2000.05.16. 660 kg dummy satellite. More...
  • GRACE American earth geodetic satellite. 2 launched, 2002.03.17 (GRACE 1 ) and (GRACE 2 ). The GRACE mission was to accurately map variations in the Earth's gravity field over its 5-year lifetime. More...
  • Most Canadian visible astronomy satellite. One launch, 2003.06.30. MOST was a suitcase-sized microsatellite designed to probe stars and extrasolar planets by measuring tiny light variations undetectable from Earth. More...
  • Mimosa Czech earth atmosphere satellite. One launch, 2003.06.30. Satellite by the Czech Astronomical Institute for study of the density of the upper atmosphere using the sensitive Macek accelerometer. More...
  • Cubesat American low-cost nanosatellite bus. Used in dozens of launches, the first on 2003.06.30. More...
  • Monitor Russian earth land resources satellite. 2 launches, 2003.06.30 (Monitor-E/SL) and 2005.08.26 (Monitor-E). More...
  • SERVIS Japanese technology satellite. First launch 2003.10.30. More...
  • Cryosat European earth resources radar satellite. CryoSat carried a radar altimeter to acquire accurate measurements of the thickness of floating sea ice so that annual variations could be detected. More...
  • KOMPSAT-2 South Korean civilian surveillance satellite. One launch, 2006.07.28, Kompsat 2. More...

Associated Engines
  • RD-0232 Kosberg N2O4/UDMH rocket engine. UR-100N / Rokot Stage 1. Engine unit (DU - dvigatelnaya ustanovka) consisting of 1 RD-0234 for tank pressurization and three RD-0233. First flight 1972. More...
  • RD-0235 Kosberg N2O4/UDMH rocket engine. 240 kN. UR-100N / RS-18 (SS-19) stage 2. Main engine based on RD-0217 with larger nozzle for altitude operation. Staged combustion cycle. Isp=320s. First flight 1972. More...
  • RD-0237 Kosberg N2O4/UDMH rocket engine. 4.9 kN. UR-100N / RS-18 (SS-19) stage 3. MIRV service block. Open cycle. Analogous to RD-0225, pressure fed. Steering engine for space vehicles gimbaling +/- 45 degree. Isp=200s. First flight 1972. More...

See also
  • UR-100N The UR-100N was designed as a replacement for the UR-100 at the end of its ten year storage life. Although it could be installed in the same silos, it was 50% heavier. The competing design of Yangel, the MR-UR-100, was also put into production when the Soviet hierarchy deadlocked and could not pick one design over the other. More...
  • missile Guided self-propelled military weapon (as opposed to rocket, an unguided self-propelled weapon). More...

Associated Manufacturers and Agencies
  • Chelomei Russian manufacturer of rockets, spacecraft, and rocket engines. Chelomei Design Bureau, Reutov, Russia. More...

Bibliography
  • McDowell, Jonathan, Jonathan's Space Home Page (launch records), Harvard University, 1997-present. Web Address when accessed: here.
  • JPL Mission and Spacecraft Library, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 1997. Web Address when accessed: here.
  • Isakowitz, Steven J,, International Reference to Space Launch Systems Second Edition, AIAA, Washington DC, 1991 (succeeded by 2000 edition).
  • Placard, TsNIIMASH Museum,
  • Isakowitz, Steven J, Hopkins, Joshua B, and Hopkins, Joseph P, International Reference to Space Launch Systems, AIAA, Washington DC, 2004.
  • Pervov, Mikhail, Raketnoye Oruzhiye RVSN, Violanta, Moscow, 1999..
  • Karpenko, A V, Utkin, A F and Popov,A D, Otechestvenniye strategischeskiye raketnoye kompleks, Sankt-Peterburg: Nevskii bastion; Gangut 1999..
  • NASA/GSFC Orbital Information Group Website, Web Address when accessed: here.
  • Space-Launcher.com, Orbital Report News Agency. Web Address when accessed: here.

Associated Launch Sites
  • Baikonur Russia's largest cosmodrome, the only one used for manned launches and with facilities for the larger Proton, N1, and Energia launch vehicles. The spaceport ended up on foreign soil after the break-up of Soviet Union. The official designations NIIP-5 and GIK-5 are used in official Soviet histories. It was also universally referred to as Tyuratam by both Soviet military staff and engineers, and the US intelligence agencies. Since the dissolution of the Soviet Union the Russian Federation has insisted on continued use of the old Soviet 'public' name of Baikonur. In its Kazakh (Kazak) version this is rendered Baykonur. More...

Associated Stages
  • UR-100N Stage 1N N2O4/UDMH propellant rocket stage. Loaded/empty mass 77,150/5,695 kg. Thrust 1,778.66 kN. Vacuum specific impulse 310 seconds. More...
  • UR-100N Stage 2N N2O4/UDMH propellant rocket stage. Loaded/empty mass 12,195/1,485 kg. Thrust 214.27 kN. Vacuum specific impulse 322 seconds. Engine has one main engine and four verniers. Verniers continue to burn for 19 seconds after mainstage shutoff. More...

UR-100N Chronology


1972 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N. FAILURE: Failure.
  • Mod 1 state trials missile test - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 0 km ( mi).

1972 September 15 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N. FAILURE: Failure.
  • Mod 1 state trials missile test - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 0 km ( mi).

1973 April 9 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N.
  • Mod 2 state trials missile test - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 1,000 km (600 mi).

1973 June 1 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N.
  • State trials missile test - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 1,000 km (600 mi).

1973 July 1 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N.
  • State trials missile test - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 1,000 km (600 mi).

1973 August 1 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N.
  • State trials missile test - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 1,000 km (600 mi).

1973 September 1 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N.
  • State trials missile test - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 1,000 km (600 mi).

1973 September 1 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N.
  • State trials missile test - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 1,000 km (600 mi).

1973 October 1 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N.
  • State trials missile test - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 1,000 km (600 mi).

1973 November 1 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N.
  • State trials missile test - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 1,000 km (600 mi).

1973 December 1 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N.
  • State trials missile test - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 1,000 km (600 mi).

1973 December 28 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N.
  • Mod 1 state trials missile test - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 1,000 km (600 mi).

1974 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N.
  • State trials missile test - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 1,000 km (600 mi).

1974 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N.
  • State trials missile test - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 1,000 km (600 mi).

1974 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N.
  • State trials missile test - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 1,000 km (600 mi).

1974 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N.
  • State trials missile test - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 1,000 km (600 mi).

1974 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N.
  • State trials missile test - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 1,000 km (600 mi).

1974 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N.
  • State trials missile test - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 1,000 km (600 mi).

1974 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N.
  • State trials missile test - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 1,000 km (600 mi).

1974 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N.
  • State trials missile test - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 1,000 km (600 mi).

1974 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N.
  • State trials missile test - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 1,000 km (600 mi).

1974 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N.
  • State trials missile test - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 1,000 km (600 mi).

1974 January 25 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N.
  • State trials missile test - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 1,000 km (600 mi).

1974 January 26 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N.
  • State trials missile test - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 1,000 km (600 mi).

1974 February 19 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N.
  • State trials missile test - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 1,000 km (600 mi).

1974 February 21 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N.
  • State trials missile test - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 1,000 km (600 mi).

1974 July 1 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N.
  • State trials missile test - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 1,000 km (600 mi).

1975 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N.
  • Joint flight trials launch - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 1,000 km (600 mi).

1975 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N.
  • Joint flight trials launch - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 1,000 km (600 mi).

1975 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N.
  • Operational missile test - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 1,000 km (600 mi).

1975 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N.
  • Operational missile test - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 1,000 km (600 mi).

1975 June 16 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N. FAILURE: Failure.
  • Operational missile test - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 0 km ( mi).

1975 July 4 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N. FAILURE: Failure.
  • Operational missile test - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 0 km ( mi).

1976 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N.
  • SLI missile test - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 1,000 km (600 mi).

1976 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N.
  • Operational missile test - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 1,000 km (600 mi).

1976 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N.
  • Joint flight trials launch - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 1,000 km (600 mi).

1976 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N.
  • Operational missile test - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 1,000 km (600 mi).

1976 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N.
  • Operational missile test - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 1,000 km (600 mi).

1976 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N.
  • Joint flight trials launch - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 1,000 km (600 mi).

1976 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N.
  • SLI missile test - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 1,000 km (600 mi).

1976 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N.
  • Operational missile test - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 1,000 km (600 mi).

1976 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N.
  • Joint flight trials launch - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 1,000 km (600 mi).

1976 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N.
  • Joint flight trials launch - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 1,000 km (600 mi).

1976 May 24 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N. FAILURE: Failure.
  • Joint flight trials launch - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 0 km ( mi).

1976 August 21 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N. FAILURE: Failure.
  • Joint flight trials launch - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 0 km ( mi).

1976 December 14 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N. FAILURE: Failure.
  • Joint flight trials launch - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 0 km ( mi).

1976 December 28 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N. FAILURE: Failure.
  • Joint flight trials launch - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 0 km ( mi).

1977 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N.
  • Operational missile test - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 1,000 km (600 mi).

1977 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N.
  • Operational missile test - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 1,000 km (600 mi).

1977 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N.
  • Operational missile test - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 1,000 km (600 mi).

1977 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N.
  • Operational missile test - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 1,000 km (600 mi).

1977 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N.
  • Joint flight trials launch - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 1,000 km (600 mi).

1978 January 1 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N.
  • Operational missile test - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 1,000 km (600 mi).

1978 January 1 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N.
  • Operational missile test - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 1,000 km (600 mi).

1978 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N.
  • Operational missile test - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 1,000 km (600 mi).

1981 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N.
  • Joint flight trials launch - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 1,000 km (600 mi).

1981 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N.
  • Joint flight trials launch - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 1,000 km (600 mi).

1981 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N.
  • Joint flight trials launch - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 1,000 km (600 mi).

1981 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N.
  • Joint flight trials launch - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 1,000 km (600 mi).

1981 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N.
  • Joint flight trials launch - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 1,000 km (600 mi).

1981 September 8 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N. FAILURE: Failure.
  • Joint flight trials launch - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 0 km ( mi).

1984 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N.
  • Operational missile test - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 1,000 km (600 mi).

1984 - . Launch Site: Baikonur. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: UR-100N.
  • Operational missile test - . Nation: USSR. Agency: RVSN. Apogee: 1,000 km (600 mi).

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