Encyclopedia Astronautica
RS-27



rs27.jpg
RS-27
Credit: Boeing / Rocketdyne
Rocketdyne Lox/Kerosene rocket engine. 1023 kN. Out of production. Isp=295s. Consisted of RS2701A/B main engine, and twin LR101-NA-11 verniers. Introduced in 1974 on the McDonnell Douglas' Delta 2000 series launcher; replaced the MB-3. First flight 1972.

The RS - 27 powerplant comprises an RS2701A/B main engine, and twin LR101 - NA - 11 verniers. Introduced in 1974 on the McDonnell Douglas' Delta 2000 series launcher it replaced the MB - 3 as the main system for that launcher. It completed it's Delta service on the 6000 model in 1992. and continues in service as part of the Atlas MA- 5A powerplant. Application: Delta 6000 series. First Flown: January 18th, 1974 on Delta 100/Skynet 2A. Flown: 107 Delta plus 8 Atlas to the end of 1993. Mounting: gimballed-mounted for pitch/yaw control with gimballed verniers for roll control. Engine Cycle: gas generator. Oxidizer: liquid oxygen at 250 kg/sec. Fuel: RP-1 hydrocarbon at 111 kg/sec. Mixture Ratio: 2.245:1. Oxidizer Turbopump: 1900 kW, 6784 rpm (7085 rpm at altitude), 70 atm discharge Pressure: Fuel Turbopump: 1289 kW, 70 atm discharge Pressure. Thrust: 971 kN sea level/1023 kN vacuum. Thrust Chamber Length: 219 cm (234 cm). Thrust Chamber Materials: 347 CRES austenitic stainless steel. Thrust Chamber Cooling: regenerative, two passes of fuel through 292 tubes. Combustion Chamber Pressure: 48 atm at injector end. Combustion Chamber Temperature: 3315 Celsius. Combustion Chamber Materials: 347 CRES austenitic stainless steel. Combustion Chamber Cooling: same as thrust chamber. Combustion Chamber Ignition: hypergolic fluid cartridge enclosed in burst diaphragms. Verniers: each LR101-NA-11 at 21.8 kg mass, 4.63/5.30 kN sea level/vac thrust, 209/246 sec sea level/vac Isp, 1.8 mixture ratio, 5.6 expansion ratio(9.8 cm exit diameter), 283 sec burn time. Designed for booster applications. Gas generator, pump-fed.

Thrust (sl): 915.500 kN (205,813 lbf). Thrust (sl): 93,357 kgf. Engine: 1,027 kg (2,264 lb). Chamber Pressure: 49.00 bar. Area Ratio: 8. Propellant Formulation: Lox/RP-1. Thrust to Weight Ratio: 102.389863547758. Oxidizer to Fuel Ratio: 2.245. Coefficient of Thrust vacuum: 1.79872892263639. Coefficient of Thrust sea level: 1.59872892263639.

Status: Out of production.
Unfuelled mass: 1,027 kg (2,264 lb).
Height: 3.63 m (11.90 ft).
Diameter: 1.07 m (3.51 ft).
Thrust: 1,023.00 kN (229,979 lbf).
Specific impulse: 295 s.
Specific impulse sea level: 264 s.
Burn time: 274 s.
First Launch: 1971.
Number: 108 .

More... - Chronology...


Associated Countries
See also
Associated Launch Vehicles
  • N-1 Delta Licensed version of Delta built in Japan using both US and Japanese components. 4 stage vehicle. More...
  • N-2 Licensed version of Delta built in Japan using both US and Japanese components. 4 stage vehicle. More...
  • Delta 4000 American orbital launch vehicle. The Delta 4000 series used more powerful Castor 4A strap-ons, but the old Extended Long Tank core with MB-3 engine. Only two of these were launched. More...
  • Delta 1000 American orbital launch vehicle. The Delta 1000 series used Castor 2 strap-ons and the Extended Long Tank core with MB-3 engine. More...
  • Delta 5000 American orbital launch vehicle. The Delta 5000 series used the more powerful Castor 4A strap-ons but with the Extended Long Tank core with RS-27 engine. Only one was launched. More...
  • Delta 2000 American orbital launch vehicle. The Delta 2000 series used Castor 2 strap-ons together with an Extended Long Tank core equipped with the more powerful RS-27 engine. This engine was derived from surplus H-1 engines intended for the Saturn IB booster of the Apollo programme. The Delta P upper stage was built by Douglas and used surplus Apollo lunar module engines from TRW. More...
  • Delta 3000 American orbital launch vehicle. The Delta 3000 series upgraded the boosters to Castor 4 solid propellant strap-ons, while retaining the Extended Long Tank core with RS-27 engine. The 3910 series used the TRW Lunar Module engine in the second stage, while the 3920 series reintroduced the Aerojet AJ110 Delta engine. More...

Associated Manufacturers and Agencies
Associated Propellants
  • Lox/Kerosene Liquid oxygen was the earliest, cheapest, safest, and eventually the preferred oxidiser for large space launchers. Its main drawback is that it is moderately cryogenic, and therefore not suitable for military uses where storage of the fuelled missile and quick launch are required. In January 1953 Rocketdyne commenced the REAP program to develop a number of improvements to the engines being developed for the Navaho and Atlas missiles. Among these was development of a special grade of kerosene suitable for rocket engines. Prior to that any number of rocket propellants derived from petroleum had been used. Goddard had begun with gasoline, and there were experimental engines powered by kerosene, diesel oil, paint thinner, or jet fuel kerosene JP-4 or JP-5. The wide variance in physical properties among fuels of the same class led to the identification of narrow-range petroleum fractions, embodied in 1954 in the standard US kerosene rocket fuel RP-1, covered by Military Specification MIL-R-25576. In Russia, similar specifications were developed for kerosene under the specifications T-1 and RG-1. The Russians also developed a compound of unknown formulation in the 1980's known as 'Sintin', or synthetic kerosene. More...

Bibliography
  • Kudryavtseva, V M, ed., Zhidkostnikh Raketnikh Dvigatley, Visshaya Shkola, Moscow, 1993.

Associated Stages
  • Delta Thor ELT Lox/Kerosene propellant rocket stage. Loaded/empty mass 84,067/4,059 kg. Thrust 1,030.21 kN. Vacuum specific impulse 296 seconds. More...
  • Delta Thor RS27 Lox/Kerosene propellant rocket stage. Loaded/empty mass 84,368/4,360 kg. Thrust 1,030.22 kN. Vacuum specific impulse 296 seconds. More...

Home - Browse - Contact
© / Conditions for Use