Encyclopedia Astronautica
1960.01.28 - NASA's Ten-Year Plan presented to Congress


In testimony before the House Committee on Science and Astronautics, Richard E. Horner, Associate Administrator of NASA, presented NASA's ten-year plan for 1960-1970. The essential elements had been recommended by the Research Steering Committee on Manned Space Flight. NASA's Office of Program Planning and Evaluation, headed by Homer J. Stewart, formalized the ten-year plan.

On February 19, NASA officials again presented the ten-year timetable to the House Committee. A lunar soft landing with a mobile vehicle had been added for 1965. On March 28, NASA Administrator T. Keith Glennan described the plan to the Senate Committee on Aeronautical and Space Sciences. He estimated the cost of the program to be more than $1 billion in Fiscal Year 1962 and at least $1.5 billion annually over the next five years, for a total cost of $12 to $15 billion.

1960:

First launching of a meteorological satellite

First launching of a passive reflector communications satellite

First launching of the Scout vehicle

First launching of the Thor-Delta vehicle

First launching of the Atlas-Agena B (DOD)

First suborbital flight by an astronaut

1961:

First launching of a lunar impact vehicle

First launching of an Atlas-Centaur vehicle

Attainment of orbital manned space flight, Project Mercury

1962:

First launching of a probe to the vicinity of Venus or Mars

1963:

First launching of a two-stage Saturn

1963-1964:

First launching of an unmanned vehicle for controlled landing on the moon

First launching of an orbiting astronomical and radio astronomical laboratory

1964:

First launching of an unmanned circumlunar vehicle and return to earth

First reconnaissance of Mars or Venus, or both, by an unmanned vehicle

1965-1967:

First launching in a program leading to manned circumlunar flight and to a permanent near-earth space station

Beyond 1970:

Manned lunar landing and return

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