Encyclopedia Astronautica
SNAP



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Snap
Credit: Surrey
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SSTL Nanosatellite
Credit: NASA
British technology satellite. One launch, 2000.06.28. Basic Surrey Nanosat bus.

With rapid advances in electronics and micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS), nanosatellites can execute sophisticated and important missions. SSTL and the University of Surrey's academic team developed the Surrey Nanosatellite Applications Platform (SNAP) as a practical platform for this new missions.

SNAP supported missions of 6 to 12 kg total mass with payloads of up to 4 kg. Yet within this small package, SSTL offered propulsion, attitude determination and control, on-board computing and communications options typical of larger missions.

The structure of SNAP was provided by three sets of modular electronic housings ('NanoTrays') formed around a triangular central bay. This central bay could host attitude actuators, propulsion units or payloads.

Equipped with GPS orbit determination, three-axis attitude control and a micro propulsion system, the SNAP platform was tailored to constellation and swarm missions that demanded dozens of inexpensive, yet capable, satellites.

SSTL launched the first SNAP platform, SNAP-1 in 2000, demonstrating the SNAP concept on a successful remote-inspection and formation flying mission.

AKA: SSTL-10.
Gross mass: 12 kg (26 lb).
Payload: 4.00 kg (8.80 lb).
First Launch: 2000.06.28.
Number: 1 .

More... - Chronology...


Associated Countries
See also
  • Kosmos 3 In 1961 Isayev and Reshetnev developed the Voskhod space launch system on the basis of the R-14 IRBM. The initial version of the two stage rocket was designated Kosmos-1. The first 'Voskhod' launch complex was at Baikonur, a modification of one of the pads at the R-16 ICBM launch complex 41. More...

Associated Launch Vehicles
  • Kosmos 3 Russian orbital launch vehicle. In 1961 Isayev and Reshetnev developed the Voskhod space launch system on the basis of the R-14 IRBM. The initial version of the two stage rocket was designated Kosmos-1. The first 'Voskhod' launch complex was at Baikonur, a modification of one of the pads at the R-16 ICBM launch complex 41. More...
  • Kosmos 11K65M Russian orbital launch vehicle. Definitive and prolific production version of satellite launcher based on Yangel R-14 IRBM. After further development at NPO Polyot (Omsk, Chief Designer A S Klinishkov), the modified Kosmos-3M added a restartable second stage with an orientation system. This booster was launched form two 'Cusovaya' launch complexes from 1967. The second stage used low thrust rockets using gas generator output to adjust the final velocity of the stage More...

Associated Manufacturers and Agencies
  • Surrey British manufacturer of spacecraft. Surrey Satellite Technologies Ltd. , Guildford, UK More...

Bibliography
  • McDowell, Jonathan, Jonathan's Space Home Page (launch records), Harvard University, 1997-present. Web Address when accessed: here.
  • NASA/GSFC Orbital Information Group Website, Web Address when accessed: here.
  • Space-Launcher.com, Orbital Report News Agency. Web Address when accessed: here.

Associated Launch Sites
  • Plesetsk Plesetsk was the Soviet Union's northern cosmodrome, used for polar orbit launches of mainly military satellites, and was at one time the busiest launch centre in the world. The collapse of the Soviet Union put the main launch site of Baikonur in Kazakh territory. It now seems that once the Proton rocket is retired, Baikonur will be abandoned and Plesetsk will be Russia's primary launch centre. Upgrades to existing launch facilities will allow advanced versions of the Soyuz rocket and the new Angara launch vehicle to be launched from Plesetsk. Plesetsk's major drawback was the lower net payload in geosynchronous orbit from a northern latitude launch site. However Russia is planning to remove the disadvantage by looping geosynchronous satellites around the moon, using lunar gravity to make the necessary orbital plane change. More...

SNAP Chronology


2000 June 28 - . 10:37 GMT - . Launch Site: Plesetsk. Launch Complex: Plesetsk LC132/1. LV Family: Kosmos 3. Launch Vehicle: Kosmos 11K65M.
  • SNAP 1 - . Mass: 6.00 kg (13.20 lb). Nation: UK. Agency: Surrey. Manufacturer: Surrey. Class: Technology. Type: Navigation technology satellite. Spacecraft: SNAP. USAF Sat Cat: 26386 . COSPAR: 2000-033C. Apogee: 710 km (441 mi). Perigee: 691 km (429 mi). Inclination: 98.1358 deg. Period: 98.70 min. The SNAP-1 Surrey Nanosatellite Applications Platform was a 6 kg satellite with imager and propulsion. It was to test rendezvous techniques by formation flying with the Tsinghua satellite placed in orbit on the same launch. In October 2000 Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd (SSTL) released a picture of Tsinghua-1 taken in orbit by the SNAP-1 6.5 kg nanosatellite.

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