Encyclopedia Astronautica
OV2



ov25.jpg
OV-2-5
Credit: USAF Museum
ov2.jpg
OV2
Credit: USAF
American earth magnetosphere satellite. 6 launches, 1965.10.15 (OV2-01) to 1968.09.26 (OV2-05). OV2 satellites were built for the USAF Office of Aerospace Research, and flew as secondary payloads on Titan IIIC test flights.

The satellites had diverse applications.

Northrop Systems Laboratories developed and produced the OV2 satellites for the USAF Office of Aerospace Research. The satellite was a secondary payload for the Titan III-C test flights. Three of the satellites were designed by Northrop, each with diverse applications. The first two OV2 satellites failed to orbit, due to a Titan transtage malfunction. Northrop designed, fabricated, integrated, assembled and tested the OV2 vehicles for the Air Force. On-board experimentation was provided by Air Force Cambridge Research Laboratories (AFCRL), Air Force Weapons Laboratory (AFWL), and the Air Force Space Systems Division, Aerospace Corporation (SSD/Aerospace). Most subsystem equipment used on the OV2 spacecraft had been demonstrated on previous programs and was readily available for other experiment applications, The spacecraft series was powered by solar energy collected by 4 paddles which extend when the vehicle was in orbit. Span of the basic satellite with paddles extended was approximately 3.7 m. The OV2-5 was a low cost, near-earth space research satellite. It was designed for solar, magnetic, and cosmic ray research in space. On September 28, 1968, it was boosted from the ground by a Titan III launch vehicle into a circular equatorial orbit at an altitude of 22,000 miles above the Earth. It was designed with an operating life in space of at least one year.

Gross mass: 189 kg (416 lb).
First Launch: 1965.10.15.
Last Launch: 1968.09.26.
Number: 6 .

More... - Chronology...


Associated Countries
See also
  • Titan The Titan launch vehicle family was developed by the United States Air Force to meet its medium lift requirements in the 1960's. The designs finally put into production were derived from the Titan II ICBM. Titan outlived the competing NASA Saturn I launch vehicle and the Space Shuttle for military launches. It was finally replaced by the USAF's EELV boosters, the Atlas V and Delta IV. Although conceived as a low-cost, quick-reaction system, Titan was not successful as a commercial launch vehicle. Air Force requirements growth over the years drove its costs up - the Ariane using similar technology provided lower-cost access to space. More...

Associated Launch Vehicles
  • Titan American orbital launch vehicle. The Titan launch vehicle family was developed by the United States Air Force to meet its medium lift requirements in the 1960's. The designs finally put into production were derived from the Titan II ICBM. Titan outlived the competing NASA Saturn I launch vehicle and the Space Shuttle for military launches. It was finally replaced by the USAF's EELV boosters, the Atlas V and Delta IV. Although conceived as a low-cost, quick-reaction system, Titan was not successful as a commercial launch vehicle. Air Force requirements growth over the years drove its costs up - the Ariane using similar technology provided lower-cost access to space. More...
  • Titan 3C American orbital launch vehicle. Titan 3A with five segment solid motors. Man-rated design originally developed for Dynasoar spaceplane. More...

Associated Manufacturers and Agencies
  • USAF American agency overseeing development of rockets and spacecraft. United States Air Force, USA. More...
  • Northrop American manufacturer of rockets and spacecraft. Northrop, USA. More...

Bibliography
  • McDowell, Jonathan, Jonathan's Space Home Page (launch records), Harvard University, 1997-present. Web Address when accessed: here.
  • JPL Mission and Spacecraft Library, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 1997. Web Address when accessed: here.
  • McDowell, Jonathan, Launch Log, October 1998. Web Address when accessed: here.
  • Aerospace Yearbook, 1966,

Associated Launch Sites
  • Cape Canaveral America's largest launch center, used for all manned launches. Today only six of the 40 launch complexes built here remain in use. Located at or near Cape Canaveral are the Kennedy Space Center on Merritt Island, used by NASA for Saturn V and Space Shuttle launches; Patrick AFB on Cape Canaveral itself, operated the US Department of Defense and handling most other launches; the commercial Spaceport Florida; the air-launched launch vehicle and missile Drop Zone off Mayport, Florida, located at 29.00 N 79.00 W, and an offshore submarine-launched ballistic missile launch area. All of these take advantage of the extensive down-range tracking facilities that once extended from the Cape, through the Caribbean, South Atlantic, and to South Africa and the Indian Ocean. More...
  • Cape Canaveral LC40 Titan launch complex. Constructed as part of the Titan Integrate-Transfer-Launch (ITL) facility at the north end of Cape Canaveral in the early 1960s. Supported a wide variety of military space missions involving Titan IIIC, Titan 34D and Titan IV vehicles. More...
  • Cape Canaveral LC41 Titan, Atlas V launch complex. Complexes 40 and 41 were constructed as part of the Integrate-Transfer-Launch (ITL) Titan launch facility at the north end of Cape Canaveral in the early 1960s. Over the next three decades, the complexes supported a wide variety of military space missions involving Titan IIIC, Titan 34D and Titan IV. Complex 41 was deactivated at the end of 1977, then upgraded for the Titan IV program in the 1986-88 period. In October 1999, Complex 41 was demolished with high explosives in order for a new pad for launch of the Atlas 5 rocket to be erected. By then it had been the starting point for 27 Titan flights. More...

OV2 Chronology


1965 October 15 - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC40. LV Family: Titan. Launch Vehicle: Titan 3C. LV Configuration: Titan IIIC 3C-4. FAILURE: Partial Failure..
  • Transtage 4 - . Nation: USA. Agency: USAF. Spacecraft: OV2. Decay Date: 1972-07-27 . USAF Sat Cat: 1624 . COSPAR: 1965-082xx. Apogee: 264 km (164 mi). Perigee: 229 km (142 mi). Inclination: 32.3000 deg. Period: 89.40 min.
  • OV2-01 - . Mass: 170 kg (370 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: USAF. Class: Earth. Type: Magnetosphere satellite. Spacecraft: OV2. Decay Date: 1972-07-27 . USAF Sat Cat: 1624 . COSPAR: 1965-082B. Apogee: 791 km (491 mi). Perigee: 708 km (439 mi). Inclination: 32.6000 deg. Period: 99.80 min. Summary: Dual launch with LCS 2; upper stage broke up. Space craft engaged in investigation of spaceflight techniques and technology (US Cat A). .
  • LCS 2 - . Nation: USA. Agency: USAF. Spacecraft: OV2. COSPAR: 1965-082xx.

1965 December 21 - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC41. LV Family: Titan. Launch Vehicle: Titan 3C. LV Configuration: Titan IIIC 3C-8.
  • Transtage 8 - . Nation: USA. Agency: USAF AFSC. Spacecraft: OV2. Decay Date: 1975-08-17 . USAF Sat Cat: 1863 . COSPAR: 1965-108xx. Apogee: 22,114 km (13,740 mi). Perigee: 337 km (209 mi). Inclination: 26.9000 deg. Period: 387.40 min.
  • OV2-03 - . Mass: 193 kg (425 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: USAF. Class: Earth. Type: Magnetosphere satellite. Spacecraft: OV2. Decay Date: 1975-08-17 . USAF Sat Cat: 1863 . COSPAR: 1965-108A. Apogee: 22,846 km (14,195 mi). Perigee: 321 km (199 mi). Inclination: 26.8000 deg. Period: 399.30 min. Summary: Upper stage separation failed. Space craft engaged in investigation of spaceflight techniques and technology (US Cat A). .

1968 September 26 - . 07:37 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC41. LV Family: Titan. Launch Vehicle: Titan 3C. LV Configuration: Titan IIIC 3C-5.
  • OV2-05 - . Mass: 204 kg (449 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: USAF. Class: Earth. Type: Magnetosphere satellite. Spacecraft: OV2. Completed Operations Date: 1968-09-01 . USAF Sat Cat: 3428 . COSPAR: 1968-081A. Apogee: 35,745 km (22,210 mi). Perigee: 35,113 km (21,818 mi). Inclination: 12.3000 deg. Period: 1,417.90 min. Environmental research. Space craft engaged in investigation of spaceflight techniques and technology (US Cat A). As of 22 August 2001 located at 128.37 deg E drifting at 4.618 deg E per day. As of 2007 Feb 27 located at 91.48E drifting at 4.631E degrees per day.

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