Encyclopedia Astronautica
FY-2



fy2b.jpg
FY-2
Geosynchronous Chinese communications satellite.
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FY-2
fy2ba.jpg
FY-2B
Credit: via Chen Lan
Chinese earth weather satellite. 5 launches, 1997.06.10 (FY-2A) to 2008.12.23 (FY-2C). The Feng Yun 2 spin-stabilized geosynchronous meteorological spacecraft was slightly more massive than China's DFH-2 communications satellite.

The Feng Yun 2 spacecraft bus diameter was 2.1 m, and total height on-station was about 4.5 m. The major payload was a scanning radiometer with S-band and UHF data distribution. The two principal sensors were visible and infrared imaging instruments with best resolution of 1.25 km and 5.0 km respectively. A water vapor sensor was also carried.

The first Fen Yung 2 satellite was undergoing final checkout on 2 April 1994 before being mated to its launch vehicle when a fire and explosion erupted, destroying the vehicle, killing one worker and injuring 20 others. The operational satellites finally launched was stationed over 104.6E. China planned to put six meteorological satellites into orbit from 2002 to 2008 to offer comprehensive weather services for the 2008 Olympic Games. These included FY-2C in 2003 and FY-2D in 2006.

Gross mass: 593 kg (1,307 lb).
Height: 4.50 m (14.70 ft).
Span: 2.10 m (6.80 ft).
First Launch: 1997.06.10.
Last Launch: 2008.12.23.
Number: 5 .

More... - Chronology...


Associated Countries
See also
  • CZ China's first ICBM, the DF-5, first flew in 1971. It was a two-stage storable-propellant rocket in the same class as the American Titan, the Russian R-36, or the European Ariane. The DF-5 spawned a long series of Long March ("Chang Zheng") CZ-2, CZ-3, and CZ-4 launch vehicles. These used cryogenic engines for upper stages and liquid-propellant strap-on motors to create a family of 12 Long-March rocket configurations capable of placing up to 9,200 kg into orbit. In 2000 China began development of a new generation of expendable launch vehicles using non-toxic, high-performance propellants with supposedly lower operating costs. However these encountered development delays, and it seemed the reliable Long March series of rockets would continue in operational use for nearly fifty years before being replaced. More...

Associated Launch Vehicles
  • CZ Chinese orbital launch vehicle. China's first ICBM, the DF-5, first flew in 1971. It was a two-stage storable-propellant rocket in the same class as the American Titan, the Russian R-36, or the European Ariane. The DF-5 spawned a long series of Long March ("Chang Zheng") CZ-2, CZ-3, and CZ-4 launch vehicles. These used cryogenic engines for upper stages and liquid-propellant strap-on motors to create a family of 12 Long-March rocket configurations capable of placing up to 9,200 kg into orbit. In 2000 China began development of a new generation of expendable launch vehicles using non-toxic, high-performance propellants with supposedly lower operating costs. However these encountered development delays, and it seemed the reliable Long March series of rockets would continue in operational use for nearly fifty years before being replaced. More...
  • CZ-3 Chinese orbital launch vehicle. The Long March 3 was a three-stage launch vehicle designed for delivery of satellites of 1,500 kg mass into geosynchronous transfer orbit. The first and second stages were based on the CZ-2C, and designed and manufactured by the Shanghai Academy of Spaceflight Technology. The majority of the technology and flight hardware used in the CZ-3 had been qualified and proven on the CZ-2C. The third stage, manufactured by CALT, was equipped with an LOX/LH2 cryogenic engine. Long March 3 was also capable of placing spacecraft into an elliptical or circular low earth orbit and sun synchronous orbit. More...
  • CZ-3A Chinese three-stage orbital launch vehicle. The Long March 3A, by incorporating the mature technologies of the CZ-3 and adding a more powerful cryogenic third stage and more capable control system, had a greater geosynchronous transfer orbit capability, greater flexibility for attitude control, and better adaptability to a variety of launch missions. More...

Associated Manufacturers and Agencies
  • SARTI Chinese manufacturer of spacecraft. Shanghai Aerospace Research Tech. Inst. , Shangai, China More...

Bibliography
  • McDowell, Jonathan, Jonathan's Space Home Page (launch records), Harvard University, 1997-present. Web Address when accessed: here.
  • McDowell, Jonathan, Jonathan's Space Report (Internet Newsletter), Harvard University, Weekly, 1989 to Present. Web Address when accessed: here.
  • Johnson, Nicholas L; and Rodvold, David M, Europe and Asia in Space 1993-1994, USAF Phillips Laboratory, Kirtland AFB, NM 80907, 1995..
  • Chen Lan, Dragon in Space, Web Address when accessed: here.
  • China's Space Activities, The State Council Information Office, P.R.C., November, 2000.
  • Wen-Rui Hu, Editor, Space Science in China, Gordon and Breach Science Publishers, China, 1997..
  • NASA/GSFC Orbital Information Group Website, Web Address when accessed: here.
  • Space-Launcher.com, Orbital Report News Agency. Web Address when accessed: here.

Associated Launch Sites
  • Xichang China's launch site for geosynchronous orbit launches. Xichang Satellite Launch Centre is situated in Xichang, Sichuan Province, south-western China. The launch pad is at 102.0 degrees East and 28.2 degrees North. The head office of the launch centre is located in Xichang City, about 65 kilometers away. Xichang Airport is 50 km away. A dedicated railway and highway lead directly to the launch site. More...

FY-2 Chronology


1994 April 2 - .
  • Chinese satellite accident. - . Nation: China. Spacecraft: FY-2. Summary: The first Fen Yung 2 geostationary weather satellite was undergoing final checkout before being mated to its launch vehicle when a fire and explosion erupted, destroying the vehicle, killing one worker and injuring 20 others..

1997 June 10 - . 12:01 GMT - . Launch Site: Xichang. Launch Complex: Xichang LC1. LV Family: CZ. Launch Vehicle: CZ-3. LV Configuration: Chang Zheng 3 CZ3-12 (45).
  • FY-2A - . Payload: Fengyun 2A. Nation: China. Agency: CASC. Manufacturer: SARTI. Class: Earth. Type: Weather satellite. Spacecraft: FY-2. USAF Sat Cat: 24834 . COSPAR: 1997-029A. Apogee: 35,784 km (22,235 mi). Perigee: 35,783 km (22,234 mi). Inclination: 0.8000 deg. Period: 1,436.10 min. Geosynchronous weather satellite; also known as FY-2B. Operated in geosynchronous orbit at 105 deg E in 1997-2000; 85 deg E in 2000.. The FY-2A stopped transmission in April 1998 but was put back into partial operation in December 1998. Its imager then failed completely on 30 September 1998 and it was retired in April 2000. As of 4 September 2001 located at 83.55 deg E drifting at 0.074 deg W per day. As of 2007 Mar 11 located at 58.96E drifting at 0.025W degrees per day.

2000 June 25 - . 11:50 GMT - . Launch Site: Xichang. Launch Complex: Xichang LC1. LV Family: CZ. Launch Vehicle: CZ-3. LV Configuration: Chang Zheng 3 CZ3-13 (61).
  • Fengyun-2 - . Mass: 1,250 kg (2,750 lb). Nation: China. Agency: CASC. Manufacturer: Shanghai Institute of Satellite Engineering. Class: Earth. Type: Weather satellite. Spacecraft: FY-2. USAF Sat Cat: 26382 . COSPAR: 2000-032A. Apogee: 35,790 km (22,230 mi). Perigee: 35,786 km (22,236 mi). Inclination: 0.8000 deg. Period: 1,436.20 min. Second Fengyun-2 weather satellite, replacing the first FY-2 (retired in April after a three year service life). The spin-stabilised FY-2 fired its solid apogee motor early on Jun 26. By July 3, it was in a 35,791 x 35,804 km x 1.1 deg orbit drifting over the Pacific. Stationed at 104 deg E. Positioned in geosynchronous orbit at 110 deg E in 2000. As of 5 September 2001 located at 104.56 deg E drifting at 0.030 deg W per day. As of 2007 Mar 11 located at 34.70W drifting at 0.629W degrees per day.

2004 October 19 - . 01:20 GMT - . Launch Site: Xichang. Launch Complex: Xichang LC2. LV Family: CZ. Launch Vehicle: CZ-3A. LV Configuration: Chang Zheng 3A CZ3A-9 (81).
  • FY-2C - . Mass: 1,380 kg (3,040 lb). Nation: China. Agency: SISE. Class: Earth. Type: Weather satellite. Spacecraft: FY-2. USAF Sat Cat: 28451 . COSPAR: 2004-042A. Apogee: 35,791 km (22,239 mi). Perigee: 35,786 km (22,236 mi). Inclination: 0.7000 deg. Period: 1,436.20 min. Third Fengyun-2 weather satellite. The apogee motor placed the satellite into a drifting geostationary orbit. As of the date of the launch, four FY-2 satellites had been launched. FY-2 01 was destroyed in a ground fire 1994. FY-2 02 / FY-2A was placed in reserve in May 2000 86 deg E; and FY-2 03 / FY-2B was operational at 123 deg E. As of 2007 Mar 11 located at 104.44E drifting at 0.026W degrees per day.

2006 December 8 - . 00:53 GMT - . Launch Site: Xichang. Launch Complex: Xichang LC2. LV Family: CZ. Launch Vehicle: CZ-3A. LV Configuration: Chang Zheng 3A CZ3A-11 (94).
  • FY 2D - . Payload: Fengyun 2D. Nation: China. Agency: SISE. Class: Earth. Type: Weather satellite. Spacecraft: FY-2. Decay Date: 2006-12-09 . USAF Sat Cat: 29641 . COSPAR: 2006-053B. Apogee: 35,789 km (22,238 mi). Perigee: 35,781 km (22,233 mi). Inclination: 2.6000 deg. Period: 1,436.00 min. Fourth Wind and Cloud 2 geostationary weather satellite with an infrared radiometer as its primary instrument. The booster placed the spacecraft in a 226 x 36221 km x 24.9 deg geosynchronous transfer orbit. The FG-36 solid apogee motor aboard the satellite burned at 18:07 GMT and placed the FY-2D into an initial 35786 x 36478 km x 2.6 deg geosynchronous drift orbit.

2008 December 23 - . 00:54 GMT - . Launch Site: Xichang. LV Family: CZ. Launch Vehicle: CZ-3A.
  • FY-2E - . Nation: China. Agency: SISE. Class: Earth. Type: Weather satellite. Spacecraft: FY-2. USAF Sat Cat: 33463 . COSPAR: 2008-066A. Apogee: 35,806 km (22,248 mi). Perigee: 35,771 km (22,227 mi). Inclination: 2.6000 deg. Period: 1,436.20 min. Summary: Member of China's geosynchronous weather satellite constellation..

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