Encyclopedia Astronautica
FH-1



dfh3.jpg
DFH-3
Credit: via Chen Lan
Chinese military communications satellite. 2 launches, 2000.01.25 (Zhongxing-22) to 2006.09.12 (Zhongxing 22A). In May 1999 Aviation Week reported that a new communication satellite, Fenghuo-1 (FH-1), would be launched by a CZ-3A by the end of 1999.

The Chinese name Fenghuo (the messaging system used by the ancient Chinese army on the Great Wall) suggested it probably would have a military mission. It was believed that technology gained from the European-Chinese Sinosat project was used to develop the new military communications satellite. A constellation of these satellites were planned to form a command-and-control network designed to link Chinese combat forces. Deployment of the new constellation began with Zhongxing 22 in January 2000. Structurally the satellite was believed to based on the DFH-3 bus.

Gross mass: 2,200 kg (4,800 lb).
First Launch: 2000.01.25.
Last Launch: 2006.09.12.
Number: 2 .

More... - Chronology...


Associated Countries
See also
  • CZ China's first ICBM, the DF-5, first flew in 1971. It was a two-stage storable-propellant rocket in the same class as the American Titan, the Russian R-36, or the European Ariane. The DF-5 spawned a long series of Long March ("Chang Zheng") CZ-2, CZ-3, and CZ-4 launch vehicles. These used cryogenic engines for upper stages and liquid-propellant strap-on motors to create a family of 12 Long-March rocket configurations capable of placing up to 9,200 kg into orbit. In 2000 China began development of a new generation of expendable launch vehicles using non-toxic, high-performance propellants with supposedly lower operating costs. However these encountered development delays, and it seemed the reliable Long March series of rockets would continue in operational use for nearly fifty years before being replaced. More...

Associated Launch Vehicles
  • CZ Chinese orbital launch vehicle. China's first ICBM, the DF-5, first flew in 1971. It was a two-stage storable-propellant rocket in the same class as the American Titan, the Russian R-36, or the European Ariane. The DF-5 spawned a long series of Long March ("Chang Zheng") CZ-2, CZ-3, and CZ-4 launch vehicles. These used cryogenic engines for upper stages and liquid-propellant strap-on motors to create a family of 12 Long-March rocket configurations capable of placing up to 9,200 kg into orbit. In 2000 China began development of a new generation of expendable launch vehicles using non-toxic, high-performance propellants with supposedly lower operating costs. However these encountered development delays, and it seemed the reliable Long March series of rockets would continue in operational use for nearly fifty years before being replaced. More...
  • CZ-3A Chinese three-stage orbital launch vehicle. The Long March 3A, by incorporating the mature technologies of the CZ-3 and adding a more powerful cryogenic third stage and more capable control system, had a greater geosynchronous transfer orbit capability, greater flexibility for attitude control, and better adaptability to a variety of launch missions. More...

Bibliography
  • McDowell, Jonathan, Jonathan's Space Home Page (launch records), Harvard University, 1997-present. Web Address when accessed: here.
  • Chen Lan, Dragon in Space, Web Address when accessed: here.
  • NASA/GSFC Orbital Information Group Website, Web Address when accessed: here.
  • Space-Launcher.com, Orbital Report News Agency. Web Address when accessed: here.

Associated Launch Sites
  • Xichang China's launch site for geosynchronous orbit launches. Xichang Satellite Launch Centre is situated in Xichang, Sichuan Province, south-western China. The launch pad is at 102.0 degrees East and 28.2 degrees North. The head office of the launch centre is located in Xichang City, about 65 kilometers away. Xichang Airport is 50 km away. A dedicated railway and highway lead directly to the launch site. More...

FH-1 Chronology


2000 January 25 - . 16:45 GMT - . Launch Site: Xichang. Launch Complex: Xichang LC2. LV Family: CZ. Launch Vehicle: CZ-3A. LV Configuration: Chang Zheng 3A CZ3A-4 (60).
  • Zhongxing-22 - . Mass: 2,300 kg (5,000 lb). Nation: China. Agency: SISE. Manufacturer: CAST. Program: Chinasat. Class: Communications. Type: Military communications satellite. Spacecraft: FH-1. USAF Sat Cat: 26058 . COSPAR: 2000-003A. Apogee: 35,794 km (22,241 mi). Perigee: 35,781 km (22,233 mi). Inclination: 3.2000 deg. Period: 1,436.10 min. First Chinese military communications satellite. Perhaps an update of the DFH-3 design. Stationed at 98 deg E. The first in a planned constellation of satellites to be launched through 2010. Positioned in geosynchronous orbit at 98 deg E in 2000. As of 5 September 2001 located at 98.03 deg E drifting at 0.005 deg W per day. As of 2007 Mar 10 located at 97.95E drifting at 0.009W degrees per day.

2006 September 12 - . 16:02 GMT - . Launch Site: Xichang. Launch Complex: Xichang LC2. LV Family: CZ. Launch Vehicle: CZ-3A. LV Configuration: Chang Zheng 3A CZ3A-10 (91).
  • Zhongxing 22A - . Mass: 2,300 kg (5,000 lb). Nation: China. Agency: CTBSC. Manufacturer: CAST. Program: Chinasat. Class: Communications. Type: Military communications satellite. Spacecraft: FH-1. USAF Sat Cat: 29398 . COSPAR: 2006-038A. Apogee: 35,817 km (22,255 mi). Perigee: 35,757 km (22,218 mi). Inclination: 0.4000 deg. Period: 1,000.00 min. Summary: Military communications satellite, launched to replace Zhongxing 22 in geosynchronous orbit at 98.0 E. As of 2007 Mar 10 located at 98.10E drifting at 0.006W degrees per day..

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