Encyclopedia Astronautica
Eurostar 2000


French communications satellite. 24 launches, 1988.03.11 (Telecom 1C) to 2006.11.08 (Badr 4 ARABSAT 4B).

The Eurostar 2000 platform was the second generation of Matra Marconi Space GEO satellite platforms serving mainly commercial telecommunications applications. The Eurostar 2000 bus was available in both basic and enhanced (Eurostar 2000+) versions. The platform was designed for high performance, reliability and cost effectiveness.

The main features of Eurostar included high versatility (2 to 6 metric tons launch mass, flexible power range) substantial payload accommodation, stable and accurate pointing and high autonomy. The Eurostar 2000 series were built at Marconi's facility in Toulouse, France. The Eurostar series could meet customer needs for fixed services/broadcast, mobile services, and interactive broadband and military applications.

Specification, Eurostar 2000 basic:. Dry mass 1200-1900 kg; launch mass 1600-2300 kg; payload mass 400 kg; payload available power 2-4 kw; 3 Axis stabilization; chemical bi-propellant propulsion. Mission lifetime 12 years.

Specification, Eurostar 2000 plus:. Dry mass 1750-2850 kg; launch mass 2300-3400 kg; payload mass 550 kg; payload available power 4-7 kw; 3 Axis stabilization; chemical bi-propellant propulsion with plasma, ion capability. Mission lifetime 12 years.

Gross mass: 3,000 kg (6,600 lb).
First Launch: 1988.03.11.
Last Launch: 2006.11.08.
Number: 24 .

More... - Chronology...


Associated Countries
See also
  • Ariane First successful European commercial launch vehicle, developed from L3S Europa launch vehicle replacement design. Development of the Ariane 1 was authorised in July 1973, took eight years, and cost 2 billion 1986 Euros. More...
  • Ariane 5 The Ariane 5 was a completely new design, unrelated to the earlier Ariane 1 to 4. It consisted of a single-engine Lox/LH2 core stage flanked by two solid rocket boosters. Preparatory work began in 1984. Full scale development began in 1988 and cost $ 8 billion. The design was sized for the Hermes manned spaceplane, later cancelled. This resulted in the booster being a bit too large for the main commercial payload, geosynchronous communications satellites. As a result, development of an uprated version capable of launching two such satellites at a time was funded in 2000. More...
  • Atlas The Atlas rocket, originally developed as America's first ICBM, was the basis for most early American space exploration and was that country's most successful medium-lift commercial launch vehicle. It launched America's first astronaut into orbit; the first generations of spy satellites; the first lunar orbiters and landers; the first probes to Venus, Mars, Mercury, Jupiter, and Saturn; and was America's most successful commercial launcher of communications satellites. Its innovative stage-and-a-half and 'balloon tank' design provided the best dry-mass fraction of any launch vehicle ever built. It was retired in 2004 after 576 launches in a 47-year career. More...
  • Atlas V The Atlas V launch vehicle system was a completely new design that succeeded the earlier Atlas series. Atlas V vehicles were based on the 3.8-m (12.5-ft) diameter Common Core Booster (CCB) powered by a single Russian RD-180 engine. These could be clustered together, and complemented by a Centaur upper stage, and up to five solid rocket boosters, to achieve a wide range of performance. More...
  • Proton The Proton launch vehicle has been the medium-lift workhorse of the Soviet and Russian space programs for over forty years. Although constantly criticized within Russia for its use of toxic and ecologically-damaging storable liquid propellants, it has out-lasted all challengers, and no replacement is in sight. More...

Associated Launch Vehicles
  • Atlas The Atlas rocket, originally developed as America's first ICBM, was the basis for most early American space exploration and was that country's most successful medium-lift commercial launch vehicle. It launched America's first astronaut into orbit; the first generations of spy satellites; the first lunar orbiters and landers; the first probes to Venus, Mars, Mercury, Jupiter, and Saturn; and was America's most successful commercial launcher of communications satellites. Its innovative stage-and-a-half and 'balloon tank' design provided the best dry-mass fraction of any launch vehicle ever built. It was retired in 2004 after 576 launches in a 47-year career. More...
  • Proton The Proton launch vehicle has been the medium-lift workhorse of the Soviet and Russian space programs for over forty years. Although constantly criticized within Russia for its use of toxic and ecologically-damaging storable liquid propellants, it has out-lasted all challengers, and no replacement is in sight. Development of the Proton began in 1962 as a two-stage vehicle that could be used to launch large military payloads or act as a ballistic missile with a 100 megaton nuclear warhead. The ICBM was cancelled in 1965, but development of a three-stage version for the crash program to send a Soviet man around the moon began in 1964. The hurried development caused severe reliability problems in early production. But these were eventually solved, and from the 1970's the Proton was used to launch all Russian space stations, medium- and geosynchronous orbit satellites, and lunar and planetary probes. More...
  • Ariane French orbital launch vehicle. First successful European commercial launch vehicle, developed from L3S Europa launch vehicle replacement design. Development of the Ariane 1 was authorised in July 1973, took eight years, and cost 2 billion 1986 Euros. More...
  • Ariane 2/3 French orbital launch vehicle. Improved version of the Ariane 1. It featured increased thrust first and second stage engines, a 25% stretched third stage, 4 seconds specific impulse improvement in the third stage, a larger internal payload fairing volume, and introduced the Sylda payload carrier for dual payloads. The Ariane 3 version added two solid rocket motor strap-ons. Development was authorised in July 1980 and had a total cost of 144 million 1986 Euros. More...
  • Ariane 3 French orbital launch vehicle. Four stage vehicle consisting of 2 x PAP solid rocket boosters + Ariane 2 core. More...
  • Ariane 44LP French orbital launch vehicle. Ariane 4 with 2 liquid rocket + 2 solid rocket strap-ons. More...
  • Ariane 44L French orbital launch vehicle. Ariane 4 with 4 liquid rocket strap-ons. More...
  • Ariane 42P French orbital launch vehicle. Ariane 4 with 2 solid rocket strap-ons. More...
  • Ariane 44P French orbital launch vehicle. Ariane 4 with 4 solid rocket strap-ons. More...
  • Atlas IIA American orbital launch vehicle. Atlas IIA was a commercial derivative of the Atlas II developed for the US Air Force. Higher performance RL10A-4 (or RL10A-4-1) engines replaced Atlas II's RL10A-3-3A engines. More...
  • Ariane 5 French orbital launch vehicle. The Ariane 5 was a completely new design, unrelated to the earlier Ariane 1 to 4. It consisted of a single-engine Lox/LH2 core stage flanked by two solid rocket boosters. Preparatory work began in 1984. Full scale development began in 1988 and cost $ 8 billion. The design was sized for the Hermes manned spaceplane, later cancelled. This resulted in the booster being a bit too large for the main commercial payload, geosynchronous communications satellites. As a result, development of an uprated version capable of launching two such satellites at a time was funded in 2000. More...
  • Ariane 5G French orbital launch vehicle. Initial version of the Ariane 5, a bit too large for the main commercial geosynchronous communications satellite payloads. More...
  • Atlas V American orbital launch vehicle. The Atlas V launch vehicle system was a completely new design that succeeded the earlier Atlas series. Atlas V vehicles were based on the 3.8-m (12.5-ft) diameter Common Core Booster (CCB) powered by a single Russian RD-180 engine. These could be clustered together, and complemented by a Centaur upper stage, and up to five solid rocket boosters, to achieve a wide range of performance. More...
  • Proton/Briz M Improved Proton orbital launch vehicle. Improvements in lower stages to reduce structural mass, increase thrust, and fully utilize propellants (reducing release of toxic chemicals in stage impact areas). Briz M storable propellant upper stage replaces Block D cyrogenic stage. More...
  • Proton/Briz M Improved Proton orbital launch vehicle. Improvements in lower stages to reduce structural mass, increase thrust, and fully utilize propellants (reducing release of toxic chemicals in stage impact areas). Briz M storable propellant upper stage replaces Block D cyrogenic stage. More...
  • Atlas V 401 American orbital launch vehicle. Atlas V version with a 4-m diameter payload fairing, single engine Centaur upper stage, and no strap-on solid boosters. Payloads: 7,095 kg (15,642 lb) to sun synchronous orbit; 4,950 kg (10,910 lb) to geosynchronous transfer orbit. More...
  • Ariane 5ECA French orbital launch vehicle, first version of the evolved Ariane 5. The solid booster motors propellant load was increased by 2.43 tonnes and the case was welded, for a weight saving in dry mass of 1.9 tonnes. The core was powered by an improved Vulcain 2 engine. The oxygen-rich cycle of the engine allowed the oxygen bulkhead to be moved within the stage, resulting in a 15.2 tonne increase in propellant in the core. A new Lox/LH2 upper stage, using the HM7B engine and oxygen tank from the Ariane 4 series, replaced the storable propellant EPS stage of earlier models. The result was an increase in payload to geoscynchronous transfer orbit from 6 tonnes to 10.5 tonnes. More...

Associated Manufacturers and Agencies
Associated Programs
  • Eutelsat EUTELSAT regional geostationary telecommunication satellite for European countries. Operated by the EUTELSAT organization. More...
  • ST Singapore/Taiwan communications satellite network operated by Singapore Telecom and Chunghwa Telecom of Taiwan. More...
  • WorldSpace The WorldSpace project, led by Ethiopian-born Noah Samara, was intended to empower the developing world by providing improved access to information. Its three satellites, Afristar, Asiastar, and Ameristar, were to broadcast digital radio to less developed countries. Small hand-held radios could pick up the 24 to 96 radio channels available on the three L-band beams broadcast by each satellite. On-board processing allows variable bit rates to provide audio quality ranging from monophonic to CD digital. Broadcasters would send their programs to the satellite with a small X-band ground station. More...

Bibliography
  • McDowell, Jonathan, Jonathan's Space Home Page (launch records), Harvard University, 1997-present. Web Address when accessed: here.
  • McDowell, Jonathan, Jonathan's Space Report (Internet Newsletter), Harvard University, Weekly, 1989 to Present. Web Address when accessed: here.
  • JPL Mission and Spacecraft Library, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 1997. Web Address when accessed: here.
  • NASA GSFC Orbital Parameters,
  • Lockheed Martin Coporation, Atlas Family Fact Sheets, September 1998.. Web Address when accessed: here.
  • NASA/GSFC Orbital Information Group Website, Web Address when accessed: here.
  • Space-Launcher.com, Orbital Report News Agency. Web Address when accessed: here.

Associated Launch Sites
  • Cape Canaveral America's largest launch center, used for all manned launches. Today only six of the 40 launch complexes built here remain in use. Located at or near Cape Canaveral are the Kennedy Space Center on Merritt Island, used by NASA for Saturn V and Space Shuttle launches; Patrick AFB on Cape Canaveral itself, operated the US Department of Defense and handling most other launches; the commercial Spaceport Florida; the air-launched launch vehicle and missile Drop Zone off Mayport, Florida, located at 29.00 N 79.00 W, and an offshore submarine-launched ballistic missile launch area. All of these take advantage of the extensive down-range tracking facilities that once extended from the Cape, through the Caribbean, South Atlantic, and to South Africa and the Indian Ocean. More...
  • Baikonur Russia's largest cosmodrome, the only one used for manned launches and with facilities for the larger Proton, N1, and Energia launch vehicles. The spaceport ended up on foreign soil after the break-up of Soviet Union. The official designations NIIP-5 and GIK-5 are used in official Soviet histories. It was also universally referred to as Tyuratam by both Soviet military staff and engineers, and the US intelligence agencies. Since the dissolution of the Soviet Union the Russian Federation has insisted on continued use of the old Soviet 'public' name of Baikonur. In its Kazakh (Kazak) version this is rendered Baykonur. More...
  • Kourou After the agreement with newly independent Algeria for France to evacuate their launch sites in that country, a location near Biscarosse was selected for French missile testing. However since only launches westwards across the Bay of Biscay could be made from this site, it was unsuitable for France's Diamant orbital launch vehicle. After reviewing 14 potential sites, a location in the South American French colony of Guiana was selected. This would allow over-water launches to a tremendous range of possible orbital inclinations -- from -100.5 deg to 1.5 deg. Being near the equator, it would provide the maximum assist from the earth's rotation for launches into equatorial orbits. The decision was formalized in April 1964 and in July 1966 ELDO chose the site for future launches of the Europa II launch vehicle. More...
  • Cape Canaveral LC36A Atlas launch complex. Launch site built in 1960 for NASA's Atlas/Centaur development program, and used for launches of that launch vehicle until its retirement. More...
  • Cape Canaveral LC36B Atlas V, Atlas launch complex. Atlas Centaur launch pad, in service from 1964 until the retirement of the launch vehicle. More...
  • Cape Canaveral LC41 Titan, Atlas V launch complex. Complexes 40 and 41 were constructed as part of the Integrate-Transfer-Launch (ITL) Titan launch facility at the north end of Cape Canaveral in the early 1960s. Over the next three decades, the complexes supported a wide variety of military space missions involving Titan IIIC, Titan 34D and Titan IV. Complex 41 was deactivated at the end of 1977, then upgraded for the Titan IV program in the 1986-88 period. In October 1999, Complex 41 was demolished with high explosives in order for a new pad for launch of the Atlas 5 rocket to be erected. By then it had been the starting point for 27 Titan flights. More...

Eurostar 2000 Chronology


1988 March 11 - . 23:28 GMT - . Launch Site: Kourou. Launch Complex: Kourou ELA1. LV Family: Ariane. Launch Vehicle: Ariane 3. LV Configuration: Ariane 3 V21.
  • Telecom 1C - . Mass: 1,210 kg (2,660 lb). Nation: France. Agency: GTE. Manufacturer: Toulouse. Program: Telecom. Class: Communications. Type: Civilian communications satellite. Spacecraft: Eurostar 2000. Completed Operations Date: 1996-03-22 . USAF Sat Cat: 18952 . COSPAR: 1988-018B. Apogee: 36,860 km (22,900 mi). Perigee: 36,037 km (22,392 mi). Inclination: 5.5000 deg. Period: 1,470.10 min. French domestic communications; 5 deg E. Communications satellite. Registration France 1984-2.B (Telecom 1A) 1985-2.B (Telecom 1B). 1988-1-C (Telecom 1C). Positioned in geosynchronous orbit at 5 deg W in 1988-1992; 3 deg E in 1992-1996 As of 5 September 2001 located at 109.19 deg W drifting at 8.404 deg W per day. As of 2007 Mar 10 located at 34.65E drifting at 8.341W degrees per day.

1991 December 16 - . 23:19 GMT - . Launch Site: Kourou. Launch Complex: Kourou ELA2. LV Family: Ariane. Launch Vehicle: Ariane 44L. LV Configuration: Ariane 44L V48.
  • Telecom 2A - . Mass: 2,275 kg (5,015 lb). Nation: France. Agency: France Telecom. Manufacturer: Toulouse. Program: Telecom. Class: Communications. Type: Civilian communications satellite. Spacecraft: Eurostar 2000. USAF Sat Cat: 21813 . COSPAR: 1991-084A. Apogee: 35,801 km (22,245 mi). Perigee: 35,773 km (22,228 mi). Inclination: 0.1000 deg. Period: 1,436.10 min. French communications; 3 deg E. Positioned in geosynchronous orbit at 3 deg E in 1992; 8 deg W in 1992-1999 As of 5 September 2001 located at 8.05 deg W drifting at 0.004 deg W per day. As of 2007 Mar 11 located at 111.59E drifting at 4.763W degrees per day.

1992 April 15 - . 23:25 GMT - . Launch Site: Kourou. Launch Complex: Kourou ELA2. LV Family: Ariane. Launch Vehicle: Ariane 44L. LV Configuration: Ariane 44L+ V50.
  • Telecom 2B - . Mass: 2,200 kg (4,800 lb). Nation: France. Agency: France Telecom. Manufacturer: Toulouse. Program: Telecom. Class: Communications. Type: Civilian communications satellite. Spacecraft: Eurostar 2000. USAF Sat Cat: 21939 . COSPAR: 1992-021A. Apogee: 35,804 km (22,247 mi). Perigee: 35,769 km (22,225 mi). Inclination: 0.0000 deg. Period: 1,436.10 min. Summary: Stationed at 3 deg E. Positioned in geosynchronous orbit at 5 deg W in 1992-1999 As of 5 September 2001 located at 24.98 deg E drifting at 0.634 deg E per day. As of 2007 Mar 9 located at 77.10W drifting at 2.683W degrees per day..

1992 September 10 - . 23:04 GMT - . Launch Site: Kourou. Launch Complex: Kourou ELA2. LV Family: Ariane. Launch Vehicle: Ariane 44LP. LV Configuration: Ariane 44LP+ V53.
  • Hispasat 1A - . Mass: 2,194 kg (4,836 lb). Nation: Spain. Agency: Hispasat. Manufacturer: Toulouse. Program: Hispasat. Class: Communications. Type: Civilian communications satellite. Spacecraft: Eurostar 2000. USAF Sat Cat: 22116 . COSPAR: 1992-060A. Apogee: 35,794 km (22,241 mi). Perigee: 35,784 km (22,235 mi). Inclination: 0.1000 deg. Period: 1,436.20 min. Summary: Stationed at 30 deg W. Positioned in geosynchronous orbit at 30 deg W in 1992-1999 As of 3 September 2001 located at 29.99 deg W drifting at 0.013 deg W per day. As of 2007 Mar 10 located at 83.37E drifting at 3.458W degrees per day..

1993 July 22 - . 22:58 GMT - . Launch Site: Kourou. Launch Complex: Kourou ELA2. LV Family: Ariane. Launch Vehicle: Ariane 44L. LV Configuration: Ariane 44L+ V58.
  • Hispasat-1B - . Mass: 2,120 kg (4,670 lb). Nation: Spain. Agency: Hispasat. Manufacturer: Toulouse. Program: Hispasat. Class: Communications. Type: Civilian communications satellite. Spacecraft: Eurostar 2000. USAF Sat Cat: 22723 . COSPAR: 1993-048A. Apogee: 35,794 km (22,241 mi). Perigee: 35,780 km (22,230 mi). Inclination: 0.0000 deg. Period: 1,436.10 min. Summary: Stationed at 30 deg W. Positioned in geosynchronous orbit at 30 deg W in 1993-1999 As of 5 September 2001 located at 30.13 deg W drifting at 0.024 deg W per day. As of 2007 Mar 8 located at 157.75E drifting at 1.953W degrees per day..

1994 November 29 - . 10:21 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC36A. LV Family: Atlas. Launch Vehicle: Atlas IIA. LV Configuration: Atlas IIA AC-110 / Centaur II 8109.
  • Orion 1 - . Mass: 2,358 kg (5,198 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: Orion. Manufacturer: Toulouse. Program: Orion. Class: Communications. Type: Civilian communications satellite. Spacecraft: Eurostar 2000. USAF Sat Cat: 23413 . COSPAR: 1994-079A. Apogee: 35,792 km (22,240 mi). Perigee: 35,781 km (22,233 mi). Inclination: 0.0000 deg. Period: 1,436.10 min. 34 Ku-band transponders for TV. Stationed at 37.48 deg W. Launch vehicle put payload into supersynchronous earth orbit with IFR trajectory option. Positioned in geosynchronous orbit at 37 deg W in 1994-1999 As of 5 September 2001 located at 37.54 deg W drifting at 0.010 deg W per day. As of 2007 Mar 11 located at 37.60W drifting at 0.015W degrees per day.

1995 December 6 - . 23:23 GMT - . Launch Site: Kourou. Launch Complex: Kourou ELA2. LV Family: Ariane. Launch Vehicle: Ariane 44L. LV Configuration: Ariane 44L-3 V81.
  • Telecom 2C - . Mass: 2,283 kg (5,033 lb). Nation: France. Agency: France Telecom. Manufacturer: Toulouse. Program: Telecom. Class: Communications. Type: Civilian communications satellite. Spacecraft: Eurostar 2000. USAF Sat Cat: 23730 . COSPAR: 1995-067A. Apogee: 35,793 km (22,240 mi). Perigee: 35,777 km (22,230 mi). Inclination: 0.1000 deg. Period: 1,436.10 min. Summary: Stationed at 1.1 deg E. Positioned in geosynchronous orbit at 3 deg E in 1996-1999 As of 5 September 2001 located at 5.05 deg W drifting at 0.004 deg W per day. As of 2007 Mar 11 located at 3.02E drifting at 0.001E degrees per day..

1996 August 8 - . 22:49 GMT - . Launch Site: Kourou. Launch Complex: Kourou ELA2. LV Family: Ariane. Launch Vehicle: Ariane 44L. LV Configuration: Ariane 44L V90.
  • Telecom 2D - . Nation: France. Agency: France Telecom. Manufacturer: Toulouse. Program: Telecom. Class: Communications. Type: Civilian communications satellite. Spacecraft: Eurostar 2000. USAF Sat Cat: 24209 . COSPAR: 1996-044B. Apogee: 35,803 km (22,246 mi). Perigee: 35,771 km (22,227 mi). Inclination: 0.2000 deg. Period: 1,436.10 min. Summary: Positioned in geosynchronous orbit at 3 deg E in 1996; 5 deg W in 1996-2000; 8 deg W in 2000.- As of 5 September 2001 located at 7.90 deg W drifting at 0.004 deg W per day. As of 2007 Mar 9 located at 7.85W drifting at 0.005W degrees per day..

1996 November 21 - . 20:47 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC36A. LV Family: Atlas. Launch Vehicle: Atlas IIA. LV Configuration: Atlas IIA AC-124.
  • Hot Bird 2 - . Payload: Eutelsat HB2. Nation: France. Agency: Eutelsat. Manufacturer: Toulouse. Program: Eutelsat. Class: Communications. Type: Civilian communications satellite. Spacecraft: Eurostar 2000. USAF Sat Cat: 24665 . COSPAR: 1996-067A. Apogee: 35,803 km (22,246 mi). Perigee: 35,768 km (22,225 mi). Inclination: 0.0000 deg. Period: 1,436.10 min. Geostationary at 13.0E. Launch vehicle put payload into supersynchronous earth orbit with IFR/MRS trajectory option. Positioned in geosynchronous orbit at 13 deg E in 1997-1999 As of 3 September 2001 located at 12.95 deg E drifting at 0.024 deg E per day. As of 2007 Mar 4 located at 13.07E drifting at 0.011E degrees per day.

1997 September 2 - . 22:21 GMT - . Launch Site: Kourou. Launch Complex: Kourou ELA2. LV Family: Ariane. Launch Vehicle: Ariane 44LP. LV Configuration: Ariane 44LP-3 V99.
  • Hot Bird 3 - . Nation: Europe. Agency: Eutelsat. Manufacturer: Toulouse. Program: Eutelsat. Class: Communications. Type: Civilian communications satellite. Spacecraft: Eurostar 2000. USAF Sat Cat: 24931 . COSPAR: 1997-049A. Apogee: 35,806 km (22,248 mi). Perigee: 35,762 km (22,221 mi). Inclination: 0.1000 deg. Period: 1,436.00 min. Summary: Geosynchronous. Stationed over 13.3E Positioned in geosynchronous orbit at 13 deg E in 1997-1999 As of 3 September 2001 located at 12.96 deg E drifting at 0.012 deg E per day. As of 2007 Mar 11 located at 3.94E drifting at 0.003W degrees per day..

1998 February 27 - . 22:38 GMT - . Launch Site: Kourou. Launch Complex: Kourou ELA2. LV Family: Ariane. Launch Vehicle: Ariane 42P. LV Configuration: Ariane 42P-3 V106.
  • Hot Bird 4 - . Nation: Europe. Agency: Eutelsat. Manufacturer: Toulouse. Program: Eutelsat. Class: Communications. Type: Civilian communications satellite. Spacecraft: Eurostar 2000. USAF Sat Cat: 25237 . COSPAR: 1998-013A. Apogee: 35,797 km (22,243 mi). Perigee: 35,773 km (22,228 mi). Inclination: 0.0000 deg. Period: 1,436.00 min. Summary: Geostationary at 13.0 degrees E. Positioned in geosynchronous orbit at 13 deg E in 1998-1999 As of 2 June 2001 located at 14.35 deg E drifting at 0.065 deg E per day. As of 2007 Mar 9 located at 7.18W drifting at 0.004W degrees per day..

1998 April 28 - . 22:53 GMT - . Launch Site: Kourou. Launch Complex: Kourou ELA2. LV Family: Ariane. Launch Vehicle: Ariane 44P. LV Configuration: Ariane 44P-3 V108.
  • Nilesat 1 - . Payload: Nilesat 101. Nation: Egypt. Agency: Nilesat. Manufacturer: Toulouse. Program: Nilesat. Class: Communications. Type: Civilian communications satellite. Spacecraft: Eurostar 2000. USAF Sat Cat: 25311 . COSPAR: 1998-024A. Apogee: 35,800 km (22,200 mi). Perigee: 35,773 km (22,228 mi). Inclination: 0.0000 deg. Period: 1,436.10 min. Egypt's first satellite. Geostationary at 7.0 degrees W. Positioned in geosynchronous orbit at 7 deg W in 1998-1999 As of 5 September 2001 located at 6.95 deg W drifting at 0.003 deg W per day. As of 2007 Mar 10 located at 7.00W drifting at 0.007W degrees per day.

1998 August 25 - . 23:07 GMT - . Launch Site: Kourou. Launch Complex: Kourou ELA2. LV Family: Ariane. Launch Vehicle: Ariane 44P. LV Configuration: Ariane 44P-3 V109.
  • ST-1 - . Payload: Singapore-Taiwan 1. Nation: Singapore. Agency: Arianespace. Manufacturer: Toulouse. Program: ST. Class: Communications. Type: Civilian communications satellite. Spacecraft: Eurostar 2000 . USAF Sat Cat: 25460 . COSPAR: 1998-049A. Apogee: 35,804 km (22,247 mi). Perigee: 35,771 km (22,227 mi). Inclination: 0.1000 deg. Period: 1,436.10 min. Singapore-Taiwan-1 Matra Marconi Space Eurostar 2000 class satellite to provide communications for Singapore Telecom and Chunghwa Telecom of Taiwan. Geostationary at 88.0 degrees E. Positioned in geosynchronous orbit at 88 deg E in 1998-1999 As of 5 September 2001 located at 88.04 deg E drifting at 0.009 deg W per day. As of 2007 Mar 10 located at 88.05E drifting at 0.007W degrees per day.

1998 October 9 - . 22:50 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC36B. Launch Pad: SLC36B. LV Family: Atlas. Launch Vehicle: Atlas IIA. LV Configuration: Atlas IIA AC-134.
  • Hot Bird 5 - . Mass: 3,000 kg (6,600 lb). Nation: France. Agency: Eutelsat. Manufacturer: Toulouse. Program: Eutelsat . Class: Communications. Type: Civilian communications satellite. Spacecraft: Eurostar 2000. USAF Sat Cat: 25495 . COSPAR: 1998-057A. Apogee: 35,807 km (22,249 mi). Perigee: 35,764 km (22,222 mi). Inclination: 0.1000 deg. Period: 1,436.00 min. Summary: Geostationary at 10.0 degrees E. Positioned in geosynchronous orbit at 13 deg E in 1998-1999 As of 3 September 2001 located at 12.97 deg E drifting at 0.010 deg E per day. As of 2007 Mar 11 located at 25.56E drifting at 0.014W degrees per day..

1998 October 28 - . 22:15 GMT - . Launch Site: Kourou. Launch Complex: Kourou ELA2. LV Family: Ariane. Launch Vehicle: Ariane 44L. LV Configuration: Ariane 44L-3 V113.
  • Afristar - . Nation: France. Agency: Worldspace. Manufacturer: Toulouse. Program: WorldSpace. Class: Communications. Type: Civilian communications satellite. Spacecraft: Eurostar 2000. USAF Sat Cat: 25515 . COSPAR: 1998-063A. Apogee: 35,805 km (22,248 mi). Perigee: 35,769 km (22,225 mi). Inclination: 0.0000 deg. Period: 1,436.10 min. Afristar was the first WorldSpace satellite. Afristar was to broadcast digital radio over Africa and the Middle East. Small hand-held radios could pick up the 24 to 96 radio channels available on the three L-band beams. Dry mass of Afristar was 1205 kg; it carried 1534 kg of propellant at launch. Geostationary at 21.0 degrees E. Positioned in geosynchronous orbit at 21 deg E in 1998-1999 As of 3 September 2001 located at 20.98 deg E drifting at 0.004 deg W per day. As of 2007 Mar 10 located at 20.98E drifting at 0.010W degrees per day.
  • GE 5 - . Mass: 1,720 kg (3,790 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: GE Americom. Manufacturer: Cannes. Program: Americom. Class: Communications. Type: Civilian communications satellite. Spacecraft: Eurostar 2000. USAF Sat Cat: 25516 . COSPAR: 1998-063B. Apogee: 35,808 km (22,250 mi). Perigee: 35,765 km (22,223 mi). Inclination: 0.0000 deg. Period: 1,436.10 min. Satellite was originally built as a backup for Argentina's Nahuelsat. This allowed Dornier and Alcatel to deliver the satellite in a record twelve months. Dry mass of GE 5 was 769 kg - it carried 950 kg of propellant at launch. Geostationary at 36.4 degrees W. Positioned in geosynchronous orbit at 79 deg W in 1998-1999 As of 3 September 2001 located at 79.00 deg W drifting at 0.004 deg W per day. As of 2007 Mar 10 located at 78.99W drifting at 0.011W degrees per day.

2000 March 21 - . 23:28 GMT - . Launch Site: Kourou. Launch Complex: Kourou ELA3. LV Family: Ariane 5. Launch Vehicle: Ariane 5G. LV Configuration: Ariane 5G V128 (505).
  • Asiastar - . Mass: 2,778 kg (6,124 lb). Nation: Europe. Agency: Worldspace. Manufacturer: Toulouse. Program: Worldspace. Class: Communications. Type: Civilian communications satellite. Spacecraft: Eurostar 2000. USAF Sat Cat: 26107 . COSPAR: 2000-016A. Apogee: 35,805 km (22,248 mi). Perigee: 35,770 km (22,220 mi). Inclination: 0.1000 deg. Period: 1,436.10 min. Direct Radio Broadcasting satelllite. First night launch of Ariane 5. Worldspace's second digital radio satellite. Joined Afristar in orbit with a mission of providing radio broadcasting to the developing world. Stationed at 105 deg E. Positioned in geosynchronous orbit at 105 deg E in 2000. As of 4 September 2001 located at 104.96 deg E drifting at 0.015 deg W per day. As of 2007 Mar 9 located at 104.99E drifting at 0.012W degrees per day.

2000 August 17 - . 23:16 GMT - . Launch Site: Kourou. Launch Complex: Kourou ELA2. LV Family: Ariane. Launch Vehicle: Ariane 44LP. LV Configuration: Ariane 44LP-3 V131.
  • Nilesat 102 - . Mass: 1,827 kg (4,027 lb). Nation: Egypt. Agency: Nilesat. Manufacturer: Toulouse. Program: Nilesat. Class: Communications. Type: Civilian communications satellite. Spacecraft: Eurostar 2000. USAF Sat Cat: 26470 . COSPAR: 2000-046B. Apogee: 35,797 km (22,243 mi). Perigee: 35,775 km (22,229 mi). Inclination: 0.0000 deg. Period: 1,436.10 min. Geosynchronous communications satellite of the Egyptian company Nilesat SA. The satellite joined Nilesat 101 in providing Ku-band broadcast services. Stationed at 7 deg W. Positioned in geosynchronous orbit at 7 deg W in 2000. As of 2 September 2001 located at 6.98 deg W drifting at 0.002 deg W per day. As of 2007 Mar 9 located at 6.97W drifting at 0.004W degrees per day.

2000 September 6 - . 22:33 GMT - . Launch Site: Kourou. Launch Complex: Kourou ELA2. LV Family: Ariane. Launch Vehicle: Ariane 44P. LV Configuration: Ariane 44P-3 V132.
  • Eutelsat W1 - . Mass: 3,250 kg (7,160 lb). Nation: Europe. Agency: Eutelsat. Manufacturer: Toulouse. Program: Eutelsat. Class: Communications. Type: Civilian communications satellite. Spacecraft: Eurostar 2000. USAF Sat Cat: 26487 . COSPAR: 2000-052A. Apogee: 35,812 km (22,252 mi). Perigee: 35,760 km (22,220 mi). Inclination: 0.2000 deg. Period: 1,436.10 min. European Telecommunications Satellite Organization's Eutelsat W1 was launched into a geostationary transfer orbit, targetted for a final 10 deg E orbital position. The box-shaped 2.5 x 5.0 m satellite has two rectangular solar panel arrays spanning 31.7m and two dishes, a European beam and a steerable beam. The payload includes 28 Ku-band transponders. Stationed at 10 deg E. Positioned in geosynchronous orbit at 1 deg E in 2000. As of 1 September 2001 located at 9.92 deg E drifting at 0.005 deg E per day. As of 2007 Mar 8 located at 10.05E drifting at 0.006W degrees per day.

2000 September 14 - . 22:54 GMT - . Launch Site: Kourou. Launch Complex: Kourou ELA3. LV Family: Ariane 5. Launch Vehicle: Ariane 5G. LV Configuration: Ariane 5G V130 (506).
  • Astra 2B - . Mass: 3,320 kg (7,310 lb). Nation: Europe. Agency: SES. Manufacturer: Toulouse. Program: Astra. Class: Communications. Type: Civilian communications satellite. Spacecraft: Eurostar 2000. USAF Sat Cat: 26494 . COSPAR: 2000-054A. Apogee: 35,801 km (22,245 mi). Perigee: 35,772 km (22,227 mi). Inclination: 0.1000 deg. Period: 1,436.10 min. Direct Broadcasting satellite. Launch postponed from July 25. Astra 2B was an Astrium/Toulouse Eurostar 2000+ television broadcast satellite owned by the Luxembourg-based Societe Europeene de Satellites. The satellite was to be stationed at 28.2E to replace the German DFS Kopernikus. It carried 28 Ku-band transponders. By September 19 Astra 2B was in a 31,153 x 35,762 km x 0.3 deg orbit, approaching geosynchronous altitude. Stationed at 28 deg E. Positioned in geosynchronous orbit at 28 deg E in 2000. As of 20 August 2001 located at 28.50 deg E drifting at 0.011 deg E per day. As of 2007 Mar 10 located at 28.15E drifting at 0.017W degrees per day.

2002 December 11 - . Launch Site: Kourou. Launch Complex: Kourou ELA3. LV Family: Ariane 5. Launch Vehicle: Ariane 5ECA. LV Configuration: Ariane 5ECA V157 (517). FAILURE: The Ariane 5 core's Vulcain-2 engine began failing at T+178 seconds. The rocket veered off course and the destruct signal was sent.. Failed Stage: 1.
  • Hot Bird 7 - . Mass: 3,350 kg (7,380 lb). Nation: Europe. Agency: Eutelsat. Manufacturer: Friedrichshafen. Program: Eutelsat. Class: Communications. Type: Civilian communications satellite. Spacecraft: Eurostar 2000. COSPAR: F20021211A. Summary: Maiden flight of Ariane 5 EC-A. Delayed from October, November 20 and 28. Hot Bird 7, a Eutelsat geostationary communications satellite, was lost in the failed first flight of the Ariane 5 EC-A. Value of the lost satellite was Euro 250 million..

2003 May 13 - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC41. Launch Pad: SLC41. LV Family: Atlas V. Launch Vehicle: Atlas V 401. LV Configuration: Atlas V 401 AV-002.
  • Hellas Sat 2 - . Mass: 3,440 kg (7,580 lb). Nation: Greece. Agency: Hellas. Class: Communications. Type: Civilian communications satellite. Spacecraft: Eurostar 2000. USAF Sat Cat: 27811 . COSPAR: 2003-020A. Apogee: 35,800 km (22,200 mi). Perigee: 35,775 km (22,229 mi). Inclination: 0.1000 deg. Period: 1,436.20 min. Summary: Launch delayed from January 30, March 11 and 14, May 10 and 12, 2003. Spacecraft former Intelsat KTV, NSS-KTV, NSS-6, Intelsat APR-3. As of 2007 Mar 8 located at 38.95E drifting at 0.006E degrees per day..

2006 February 28 - . 20:10 GMT - . Launch Site: Baikonur. Launch Complex: Baikonur LC200/39. LV Family: Proton. Launch Vehicle: Proton/Briz M. LV Configuration: Proton-M/Briz-M 535-11. FAILURE: Briz-M stage shut down 27.5 minutes into a planned 31-minute burn and could not be restarted. The failure left the satellite in a useless orbit from which it quickly decayed... Failed Stage: 4.
  • Arabsat 4 - . Payload: ES-2000+. Mass: 3,341 kg (7,365 lb). Nation: Arab States. Agency: Arabsat. Manufacturer: EADS Astrium. Program: Arabsat. Class: Communications. Type: Civilian communications satellite. Spacecraft: Eurostar 2000. Decay Date: 2006-03-24 . USAF Sat Cat: 28943 . COSPAR: 2006-006A. Apogee: 14,684 km (9,124 mi). Perigee: 497 km (308 mi). Inclination: 51.6000 deg. Period: 273.80 min. Summary: The satellite seperated from the stage but the mission could not be rescued. It was ordered to fire its apogee engine around 00:20 GMT on March 24 to lower its perigee into the atmosphere. It reportedly burned up over the South Pacific at 02:07 GMT..

2006 November 8 - . 20:01 GMT - . Launch Site: Baikonur. Launch Complex: Baikonur LC200/39. LV Family: Proton. Launch Vehicle: Proton/Briz M. LV Configuration: Proton-M/Briz-M 535-15.
  • Badr 4 ARABSAT 4B - . Mass: 3,280 kg (7,230 lb). Nation: Arab States. Agency: Arabsat. Manufacturer: EADS Astrium. Class: Communications. Type: Civilian communications satellite. Spacecraft: Eurostar 2000. USAF Sat Cat: 29526 . COSPAR: 2006-051A. Apogee: 35,807 km (22,249 mi). Perigee: 35,764 km (22,222 mi). Inclination: 0.1000 deg. Period: 1,436.00 min. Summary: Dry mass 1487 kg. The satellite provided Ku-band communications services for Arab League countries. As of 2007 Mar 10 located at 26.06E drifting at 0.011E degrees per day..

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