Encyclopedia Astronautica
Tereshkova



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Tereshkova
Credit: www.spacefacts.de - www.spacefacts.de v6.avi

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Tereshkova bids farewell to Korolev prior to her flight
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Tereshkova aboard Vostok 6
Credit: RKK Energia
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Tereshkova and daughter and Khrunov communicate with Nikolayev during Soyuz 9.
Credit: RKK Energia
Tereshkova, Valentina Vladimirovna (1937-) Russian cosmonaut. First woman in space, aboard Vostok 6. But the flight was propaganda and future spaceflight opportunities did not develop. Was married to cosmonaut Andrian Nikolayev. Later a leading Communist politician.

Tereshkova was born and raised in Maslennikovo, a small town in the Yaroslavl Region. Her family included a younger brother, Vladimir, and an older sister. Her father, a tractor driver, Vladimir Aksyenovich Tereshkov, went missing in action in the Finno-Russian War of 1939-1940. Her mother, Elena Fedorovna, a worker in a textile plant, was left to raise the three children on her own.

Tereshkova did not begin school until age eight, at the end of the war. But at 17 she had to leave school and begin working at the textile plant in order to help support the family. But she was ambitious, and wanted more from life. She continued her education by correspondence course and learned sky diving through the DOSAAF Aviation Club in Yaroslavl, an auxiliary organization of the Soviet Air Force. Tereshkova made her first jump on 21 May 1959. Thereafter she set up the Textile Mill Workers Parachute Club and became its first head. Two years later she became secretary of the local Komsomol (Young Communist League) and had earned certification as a cotton-spinning technology expert. A month after her 24th birthday, in April 1961, the Soviet Union launched the first man into space - Yuri Gagarin aboard the Vostok-1 spacecraft.

Cosmonaut chief Kamanin had brought up the concept of a female spaceflight to the Soviet Air Force and Chief Designer Korolev immediately after Gagarin's flight. He believed it was their patriotic duty to beat the Americans in putting a woman in space. He wanted to find a female cosmonaut who would be a dedicated Communist agitator in the same class as Gagarin or Titov. Korolev agreed, and in October 1961 included a requirement for five women among the 50 new cosmonauts he wanted recruited for his ambitious new space plans.

Piloting experience was not necessary, since the Vostok was completely automatic and the occupant was considered a mere passenger. However parachuting experience was essential, since the Vostok cosmonaut was ejected clear of the capsule after re-entry and landed on earth under a personal parachute. So the qualifications were: females under 30 years of age; under 170 cm tall; under 70 kg in weight; physically fit; ideologically pure; who had completed parachute training of at least five to six months duration. Cosmonaut chief Kamanin was one of the founders of DOSAAF, so it was logical to search for 'likable girls' with parachuting experience in the Soviet Union's aero clubs. A review of DOSAAF dossiers indicated there were 58 potential candidates, of which 40 passed the paper review and were called to Moscow for interviews and physical examinations in January 1962.

Tereshkova met the requirements, and the only fleck on her record was the fact that her father was MIA as opposed to KIA. This raised the remote possibility he had deserted or fled. However her credentials as a Komsomol leader got her over this hurdle, and Tereshkova was one of five women selected as cosmonaut-candidates on 16 February 1962. She was the least qualified of the candidates selected, with no higher education. The other four women included test pilots, world-class parachutists, and engineers.

All five underwent the complete course of training, including weightless flights, parachute jumps, isolation tests, and centrifuge tests. At the beginning Kamanin found Solovyova, Tereshkova, and Kuznetsova to be the leading candidates for the first female flight. While Tereshkova excelled in the physical training, she had more difficulty with rocket theory and spacecraft engineering. The women then entered follow-on training included 120 parachute jumps and pilot training in MiG-15UTI jet trainers. They were commissioned as lieutenants in the Soviet Air Force. During this period Tereshkova also became a full member of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union.

In May 1962 a Soviet delegation, including cosmonaut Gherman Titov and Kamanin, visited Washington. Kamanin and Titov were invited to a barbecue at the home of astronaut John Glenn. Glenn, already politically-connected, was an enthusiastic supporter of the 'Mercury 13' - female pilots who had passed the astronaut physical and were lobbying to be trained as Mercury astronauts. Kamanin understood from Glenn that the first American woman would make a three-orbit Mercury flight by the end of 1962. Armed with the threat that 'the Americans will beat us', Kamanin was able to obtain a decision to go ahead with the first flight of a Soviet woman within weeks of his return - and not just one woman. In August 1962 the Soviets pulled off the first dual manned spaceflight, with Vostok 3 and 4 orbiting in space together, each carrying a Soviet man. Kamanin proposed that Vostok 5 and 6 should orbit two women simultaneously in the following spring. This became the official plan for the 1963 spaceflight series.

On 19 November 1962 selection for the flights took place. Ponomaryova and Tereshkova were the final candidates - but who would be the first Soviet woman in space? Ponomaryova had the best test results, but did not give 'proper' replies in the interviews with the puritanical Communist selection board. When asked 'What do you want from life?' she replied, 'I want to take everything it can offer'. Tereshkova, on the other hand, intoned 'I want to support irrevocably the Komsomol and Communist Party'. Ponomaryova also maintained that a woman could smoke and still be a decent person, and had made 'scandalous' trips unescorted into the town of Fedosiya while there for parachute training.

This dual female flight plan was approved all the way up the Soviet hierarchy until it was killed at the last moment at a meeting of the Presidium of the Communist Party on 21 March 1963 by party ideologue Kozlov and Ministry of Defense Chief Ustinov. Only one female would be allowed to fly for propaganda purposes. A male cosmonaut (Bykovsky) was rushed into final training for Vostok 5, delaying the dual flights for two months.

Korolev proposed Tereshkova for Vostok 6, on the grounds that she was less qualified than Ponomaryova. He planned to fly two women aboard a multiple-crew version of the Vostok, the Voskhod. This would be a much more complex mission, involving space piloting skills and a spacewalk by one of the cosmonauts. For this mission Korolev would need a commander with the skills of Ponomaryova, and a spacewalker with the courage and strength of Solovyova. So Tereshkova, the less skilled of the three, was his choice for the 'spam in the can' Vostok mission.

But it was Premier Khrushchev himself who made the final crew selection. Tereshkova embodied the qualities expected of the New Soviet Woman. She was a reliable communist, a factory worker from a humble background, and a 'good' girl. Most importantly, she had the looks, charm, and attitude necessary for celebrity - Kamanin would later call her 'Gagarin in a skirt'.

The correct propaganda tone had to be set. The female cosmonauts arrived at the cosmodrome for the flight in their military uniforms, but had to go back into the aircraft and change into civilian skirts and blouses for the filming of their arrival.

On June 14, 1963, Vostok 5 was launched with Bykovsky aboard. Two days later, Tereshkova became the first woman in space aboard Vostok 6, with the call sign 'Chaika' (Seagull). There were problems during the flight, unrevealed at the time, but discussed in the memoirs of Kamanin, Korolev, and Mishin published after the fall of the Soviet Union. However Tereshkova did not reveal her side of the story - what really happened - until 2007.

It was said originally that Korolev was unhappy with Tereshkova's performance in orbit and she was not permitted to take manual control of the spacecraft as had been planned. Mishin later claimed she was 'on the edge of psychological instability'. Kamanin reports in his diaries that one official tried to insert a paragraph in the official press release about Tereshkova's poor emotional state while in space. The sentence claimed she experienced overwhelming emotions, tiredness, and a sharply reduced ability to work and complete all of her assigned tasks. Kamanin disagreed, saying this exaggerated her difficulties during the flight. She only had tasks assigned for the first day. When the flight was extended for a second, and then a third day, there was essentially nothing for her to do. The ground command did nothing to support her during those additional days. She certainly was never tired, never objected, but rather did all she could to complete fully the flight program.

Tereshkova's version was that the automatic orientation system of her Vostok capsule was incorrectly set up. She noticed immediately on orbit insertion that her capsule was oriented 90 degrees from the intended direction, which meant that if retrofire was initiated, she would be sent to her death in a higher orbit rather than braked for a return to the earth's atmosphere. She advised a disbelieving ground control team of this. They finally verified it and sent signals to the spacecraft on the second day in orbit to correct the problem. It seems that clearing up this problem may have been what delayed her return to earth.

It was true she threw up in space, and it was said that Korolev wanted to bring her down early because of this. But Tereshkova has reaffirmed that this was not due to space-sickness but rather the poor quality of the space food she had been provided with. The black bread was much too dry. So she ate the few items she found palatable. She was ordered to remain strapped to her seat, evidently to combat her supposed space-sickness, but she developed a cramp in her right shin on the second day. This did not go away and became intolerable painful by the third day. To this was added a sore pressure point where the ring of her helmet pressed on her shoulder, and an itch that could not be scratched as a rash developed under one of the biomedical sensors.

After being ejected from the capsule, Tereshkova saw to her horror that she was heading for a splashdown in a large lake. Exhausted, dehydrated, and hungry, she doubted she would have had the strength to swim to shore. However a high wind blew her over the shore, but also resulted in a heavy landing. She hit her nose on her helmet, making a dark blue bruise. Heavy makeup was needed for the public appearances that followed. She worried that the makeup would conflict with her pure worker girl image.

Whatever the case, Tereshkova had completed three days in space aboard Vostok 6, more than the flight time of all the American astronauts put together. Bykovsky's Vostok 5 had been planned for a record eight days in space, but Bykovsky had trouble with his thermal regulation system and ended up landing after five days, only three hours after Vostok 6.

After her flights certain elements in the Soviet Air Force attempted to discredit her. There were charges that she was drunk when she reported to the launch pad, and that she was insubordinate in orbit, disregarding direct orders from the Center. Evidently they thought she should have accepted death from the incorrect spacecraft orientation rather than embarrass any managers on the ground. In the September after the flight, the militia claimed that Tereshkova was drunk and created a scandal with a militia officer in Gorkiy. She categorically denied being drunk, admitted to having a confrontation with a militia captain. Kamanin defended her against all of these attacks, and in the end it was Tereshkova's opponents who were dismissed.

During the summer of 1963 a joke began circulating that she should marry Andrian Nikolayev, the only bachelor cosmonaut to have flown. Tereshkova revealed in 2007 that she and Nikolayev, both of similar peasant backgrounds, were already attracted to each other before the flight. It was simply untrue, as was the later conventional wisdom, that they disliked each other. Whatever the case, the rumor of their love affair eventually reached Khrushchev. He thought it would be a great idea for them to marry and began applying pressure through Kamanin. They gave in and the marriage ceremony took place on 3 November 1963, at the Moscow Wedding Palace. The wedding party was held at a governmental mansion set apart for state receptions. Khrushchev himself presided, with top government and space program leaders attending.

On 8 June 1964, Tereshkova gave birth to a daughter, Elena Andrianovna, who later went on to become a physician. But the marriage was not happy - Khrushchev's "space family" fell apart within a few years. Nikolayev was a gruff Chuvash, who had time for his male friends and little for his wife. Kamanin was having to constantly contend with disputes. However, as was the case with the American astronauts of this era, to divorce would mean the end of their careers. The couple remained together.

Tereshkova and her fellow female cosmonauts were not truly integrated into the cosmonaut detachment and considered for flight assignments on an equal basis with the 'regular' male cosmonauts. Throughout the Soviet period flights of women into space were considered only for propaganda purposes. Furthermore, since the number of flight slots was always smaller than the pool of cosmonauts, any woman who flew into space was taking the place of a man. The all-female Voskhod flight was canceled, at first under pressure from Gagarin and the other male cosmonauts, finally in order to concentrate on development of the Soyuz spacecraft.

Tereshkova obtained a graduate level engineering education at the Zhukovskiy Military Air Academy from 1964 to 1969. After her graduation, in October 1969, the female cosmonaut detachment was disbanded. Tereshkova was pushed into a hectic life as a prominent Communist politician and international representative.

It was only in the late 1970's, with impending flights by American women on the space shuttle, that the Soviet government again recruited a new group of woman cosmonauts. Tereshkova hoped to fly again, and submitted herself to review by a medical commission in 1978. It was during these reviews that she met Yuliy Shaposhnikov, a physician working at a military medical academy. The couple fell in love, and Tereshkova separated from Nikolayev in 1979. Tereshkova was told she had not passed the tests and would not be allowed to fly in space again. She applied for divorce from Nikolayev, but it required the personal permission of Soviet Premier Brezhnev, which only came in 1982.

Tereshkova and Shaposhnikov lived happily together for twenty years until his death in 1999. Tereshkova's image in these years was of a prim, perfectly coifed, but cold and iron-willed Communist apparatchik. But she personally felt that all of the party obligations were an unfair burden. She was not compensated for the work, but rather continued on the payroll of the cosmonaut center. All the while she still dreamed of returning to space, particularly being part of the first expedition to Mars. This dream of getting to Mars was shared among the first cosmonauts. Some were even willing to go on a one-way mission, including Tereshkova. Furthermore, although called the 'iron lady' by some, the constant good works Tereshkova accomplished revealed her true soul. These ranged from incessant assistance to citizens with problems, to personally supporting several orphanages.

During Soviet times Tereshkova was a prominent member of the Communist Party and a representative of the Soviet government to numerous international women's organizations and events. She was a member of the World Peace Council in 1966; a member of the Yaroslavl Supreme Soviet in 1967; a member of the council of the Union of the Supreme Soviet in 1966-1970 and 1970-1974. She was elected to the presidium of the Supreme Soviet in 1974. She was the Soviet representative to the UN Conference for the International Women's Year in Mexico City in 1975. Through the 1980's she continued as a Deputy to the Supreme Soviet , Vice President of the International Women's Federation; and several other international positions.

Svetlana Savitskaya became the second Russian woman in space in 1982, and the first woman to walk in space in 1984. A planned all-female Soyuz flight, planned for Soyuz T-15 on International Women's Day in 1985, was canceled due to problems with the Salyut 7 space station. Only after the fall of the Soviet Union would Russian women begin flying to the Mir and ISS space stations as regular crew members, not as propaganda objects.

After the death of her life companion, Tereshkova retired to a small brick dacha on the outskirts of Star City. The house was topped with a seagull weathervane, commemorating the call sign of her flight in space. She enjoyed visits from friends developed over a long and full life, and from her daughter, and grandsons Andrei and Aleksei.

As memories she had the many medals and distinctions she received, including two Orders of Lenin; recognition as a Hero of the Soviet Union; the United Nation Gold Medal of Peace; the Simba International Women's Movement Award; and the Joliot-Curie Gold Medal.

Birth Place: Maslennikovo, Yaroslavl.
Status: Inactive.
Born: 1937.03.06.
Spaceflights: 1 .
Total time in space: 2.95 days.

More... - Chronology...


Associated Countries
See also
  • Cosmonaut Category of persons who have been trained for spaceflight in Russia. More...

Associated Flights
  • Vostok 6 Crew: Tereshkova. Joint flight with Vostok 5. First woman in space. Tereshkova did not reply during several communications sessions. To this day it is not known if she was paralysed with fear, or if there was an equipment failure. Backup crew: Solovyova, Ponomaryova. More...

Associated Manufacturers and Agencies
Associated Programs
  • Venera Russian series of spacecraft that explored the planet Venus. Venera spacecraft made the first soft landings on the surface of Venus and returned the first images from the surface. More...
  • Vostok World's first manned spacecraft, it was later developed into the Voskhod, and numerous versions of Zenit recoverable reconnaisance, materials, and biological research satellites which remained in service into the 21st Century. More...

Tereshkova Chronology


1961 October 24 - .
  • Gagarin out of the hospital. - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Vershinin; Korolev; Keldysh; Tereshkova. Program: Vostok. Flight: Vostok 6. Korolev says he will need 28 pilot-cosmonauts and 22 specialist cosmonauts (engineers, scientists, etc) in the period 1962-1964. This is to include five women. Kamanin had already brought up the concept of a female spaceflight to Vershinin, Korolev, and Keldysh immediately after Gagarin's flight. He believed it was their patriotic duty to beat the Americans in putting a woman in space, and he wanted to find a female cosmonaut who would be a dedicated Communist agitator in the same class as Gagarin or Titov.

1962 January 16 - .
1962 January 18 - .
1962 February 16 - .
  • Female Cosmonaut Training Group selected. - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Kuznetsova; Ponomaryova; Solovyova; Tereshkova; Yerkina. The group was selected to provide female astronauts for the Vostok manned spaceflight program.. Qualifications: Parachutists under 30 years of age; under 170 cm tall; under 70 kg in weight.. Cosmonaut commander Nikolai Kamanin obtained official approval to train a cadre of female cosmonauts in October 1961. The pool of Soviet female pilots being limited, potential candidates were also sought who were active sport parachutists. Five Soviet women were selected on 16 February 1962 and reported for training a month later. However the flight of a woman in space had little support from Chief Designer Korolev or Kamanin's military commanders.

    In May 1962 a Soviet delegation, including cosmonaut Gherman Titov and Kamanin, visited Washington. On May 3 Kamanin and Titov were invited to a barbecue at the home of astronaut John Glenn. Glenn, already politically-connected, was an enthusiastic supporter of the 'Mercury 13' - female pilots who had passed the astronaut physical and were lobbying to be trained as Mercury astronauts. Kamanin understood from Glenn that the first American woman would make a three-orbit Mercury flight by the end of 1962. Armed with the threat that 'the Americans will beat us', Kamanin was able to obtain a decision to go ahead with the first flight of a Soviet woman within weeks of his return.

    Meanwhile the five female cosmonaut were going through the complete course of cosmonaut training, including weightless flights, parachute jumps, isolation tests, centrifuge tests, and academic studies of rocket theory and spacecraft engineering. The women undertook 120 parachute jumps and received pilot training in MiG-15UTI jet trainers.

    Even though NASA's female astronaut flight never materialised, Valentina Tereshkova of the Soviet Union became the first woman in space on June 16, 1963. Following her flight the women were enrolled in the arduous test pilot course at the Zhukovskiy Academy (except Ponomareva, who was a graduate engineer from the Moscow Aviation Institute). There were plans for all-female Vostok or Soyuz flights, but these never materialised. The female training group was disbanded in October 1969. The Soviet Union used only male cosmonauts until the 1980's, when women were again recruited, in order to again have a Soviet woman in space before the Americans finally began flying female astronauts on the space shuttle.


1962 February 28 - .
1962 June 23 - .
  • Summer vacation - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Komarov; Shonin; Volynov; Kuznetsova; Ponomaryova; Solovyova; Tereshkova; Yerkina. The only cosmonauts staying at TsPK are Komarov, Shonin, Volynov, and the five female cosmonauts. Kamanin believes the Soviet Union had every possibility of making several multi-day spaceflights in 1962, up to 8-10 days, but that this is no longer possible due to delays caused by repeated booster failures and poor leadership.

1962 August 25 - . 02:18 GMT - . Launch Site: Baikonur. Launch Complex: Baikonur LC1. LV Family: R-7. Launch Vehicle: Molniya 8K78. LV Configuration: Molniya 8K78 T103-12. FAILURE: At T+60 min 50 sec one of the four solid motors of the escape stage's BOZ unit did not fire. The resulting asymmetric torque caused the stage to lose correct attitude and three seconds after ignition of the main engine S1.5400A1 it began to tumble.. Failed Stage: 3.
  • Sputnik 19 - . Payload: 2MV-1 s/n 1. Mass: 890 kg (1,960 lb). Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Kuznetsova; Ponomaryova; Solovyova; Tereshkova; Yerkina. Agency: RVSN. Program: Venera; Vostok. Class: Venus. Type: Venus probe. Spacecraft: Mars 2MV-1. Decay Date: 1962-08-28 . USAF Sat Cat: 371 . COSPAR: 1962-A-Pi-1. Apogee: 252 km (156 mi). Perigee: 173 km (107 mi). Inclination: 64.9000 deg. Period: 88.70 min. Attempt to launch a probe towards Mars. The launch went well, but the fourth stage motor burnt for only 45s of the planned 240s. The stage remained in Earth orbit. However Kamanin notes that it was good that the launch of the basic vehicle was a success - it gave the visiting female cosmonauts confidence in the rocket they will have to ride.

1962 November 19 - .
1963 March 2 - .
  • Plan for Cosmonaut Training - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Gagarin; Kuznetsova; Ponomaryova; Solovyova; Tereshkova; Yerkina. The big question regards Gagarin. Shall the 'Columbus of the Cosmos' be allowed to risk his life on another spaceflight? Most of the Soviet leadership are against it, but Gagarin himself wants to train and fly again. Later in the day the cosmonauts have an idiotic argument with IAKM on high-G centrifuge runs for female cosmonauts. This is the first cosmonaut revolt against the policies and practices of IAKM.

1963 April - .
  • Vostok 6A (cancelled) - . Crew: Ponomaryova. Backup Crew: Yerkina. Payload: Vostok 3KA s/n 8. Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Ustinov; Tereshkova; Bykovsky; Ponomaryova; Yerkina. Program: Vostok. Flight: Vostok 6A. Spacecraft: Vostok. Decay Date: 1963-06-19 . USAF Sat Cat: 595 . Apogee: 192 km (119 mi). Perigee: 163 km (101 mi). Inclination: 64.9000 deg. Period: 88.00 min. From August 1962 until February 21, 1963 it was planned that the next two Vostok flights (Vostok 5 and 6) would take place in March-April 1963 and be a dual female flight. Two capsules would be launched a day apart; each would remain aloft for three days. Although a final decision would only be made at the last minute, cosmonaut chief Kamanin always planned to name Tereshkova for the first flight. She was appropriately feminine and modest, and always mouthed the correct Communist party line in interviews. Ponomaryova was considered the most qualified candidate technically and emotionally for the Vostok 6 flight. However her aggressive feminism and failure to mouth Soviet catch-phrases were considered drawbacks by the male Communist stalwarts that ran the programme. This dual female flight plan was approved all the way up the Soviet hierarchy until it was killed at the last moment at a meeting of the Presidium of the Communist Party on 21 March 1963 by party ideologue Kozlov and Ministry of Defence Chief Ustinov. Only one female would be allowed to fly for propaganda purposes. A male cosmonaut (Bykovsky) was rushed into final training, delaying the dual flights for two months. Tereshkova made it into space aboard Vostok 6, following Bykovsky aboard Vostok 5. But Ponomaryova and the other female cosmonauts trained in the 1960ís never flew.

1963 April 19 - .
  • Cosmonaut training for Vostok 5/6. - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Bykovsky; Volynov; Leonov; Khrunov; Tereshkova. Flight: Vostok 5; Vostok 6. Spacecraft: Vostok. It is clear that the female cosmonauts are trained and ready for an August flight, and the men (Bykovskiy, Volynov, Leonov, Khrunov) can complete training by that date. The male cosmonauts object to spending 7 to 8 days in a spacesuit in the ground spacecraft mock-up as required by the flight doctors. They don't want to spend more than 3 to 4 days.

1963 May 4 - .
  • Kamanin informed that a dual spaceflight has been decreed within the next 6 weeks. - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Bykovsky; Volynov; Leonov; Khrunov; Tereshkova; Korolev; Titov; Alekseyev, Semyon. Flight: Vostok 5; Vostok 6. Only today is Kamanin informed that a dual flight has been decreed within the next 3 to 6 weeks. The women are ready, but Bykovskiy and Volynov need a few parachute jumps and training in the hot mock-up. Leonov and Khrunov need additional centrifuge training as well. Bykovskiy and Volynov should be ready by 30 May, and Leonov and Khrunov by 15 June. Therefore earliest possible launch date is 5 to 15 June. Alekseyev's bureau is as always the pacing factor. He can adapt one of the female ejection seats for Bykovskiy, but not for Volynov. The space suit for Leonov will only be completed by 30 May. Kamanin talks to Korolev about dumping Alekseyev's bureau in the future. Cosmonaut parachute trainer Nikitin agrees that Bykovskiy can complete his parachute qualification at Fedosiya on 9-10 May. Further bad behaviour by Titov is reported during a trip to Kiev. He insulted an officer ('I am Titov, who are you?') and then had general's wives intervene on his behalf to get him out of trouble.

1963 May 11 - .
  • Vostok 5 / Vostok 6 Planning - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Bykovsky; Volynov; Leonov; Khrunov; Tereshkova; Solovyova; Ponomaryova; Yerkina; Keldysh; Rudenko; Korolev. Flight: Vostok 5; Vostok 6. Spacecraft: Vostok. Korolev reports still problems with components of the electrical system from the Kharkov factory -- the same problems that existed in 1962. The cosmonauts will go to Tyuratam on 27/28 May, with launch planned for 3/5 June. Bykovskiy is named prime for Vostok 5, with Volynov his backup. Tereshkova is named prime for Vostok 6, with Solovyova and Ponomaryeva both as her backups. This selection is however made despite strong support for Ponomaryeva as prime by Keldysh and Rudenko.

1963 May 14 - .
  • Tereshkova and Solovyova rated most ready to fly on Vostok 6. - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Tereshkova; Bykovsky; Solovyova; Ponomaryova; Yerkina. Flight: Vostok 6; Vostok 5. Spacecraft: Vostok. Summary: Tereshkova and Solovyova are most ready to fly and will be sent to Fedosiya for sea training first. Ponomaryova and Yerkina will follow tomorrow. Bykovskiy started his run in the hot mock-up at 10:00 am. .

1963 May 21 - .
1963 June 3 - .
  • Vostok 5/6 Flight Preparations - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Tereshkova; Solovyova; Ponomaryova; Bykovsky; Volynov; Korolev. Flight: Vostok 6; Vostok 5. Spacecraft: Vostok. At 9 am Tereshkova, Solovyova, and Ponomaryova practice donning and doffing their space suits. Bykovskiy and Volynov prepare their ship's logs. Korolev discusses plans for tests of the cosmonaut's ability to discern objects from space. Colonel Kirillov completes preparation of the spacecraft for flight.

1963 June 4 - .
  • The State Commission for Vostok 5/6 launches meets. - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Tereshkova; Bykovsky. Flight: Vostok 6; Vostok 5. Spacecraft: Vostok. All is ready, but the wind is predicted to by 15 to 20 m/s on 7 June. The launch vehicle cannot be launched in winds over 15 m/s. Bykovskiy and Tereshkova are confirmed as the crew for 8 and 3 day flight durations. When they return to earth, a new and difficult life as celebrities will begin for them -- they will be known all over the world.

1963 June 8 - .
  • Vostok 5/6 Flight Preparations - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Tereshkova. Flight: Vostok 6. Spacecraft: Vostok. Summary: A review of the spacecraft radio problems shows that the rejection rate for production equipment is 6% against 2% guaranteed by 5-GURVO. Tereshkova sits in the Vostok 6 spacecraft, and makes a good impression on the technicians. .

1963 June 11 - .
  • Vostok 5 slipped to 14 June - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Bykovsky; Tereshkova; Korolev. Flight: Vostok 5; Vostok 6. Spacecraft: Vostok. The cosmonauts spend the day on the beach. Tereshkova sits a long time with Korolev on the balcony on the second floor of the house on the river. He interviews here thoroughly to make sure she is ready for the flight. The State Commission meets at 17:00. The expected solar flare did not occur, but the Crimean Observatory claims the risk will remain high. The decision is made to defer the launches to 14/15 June.

1963 June 14 - .
  • Tereshkova meets with the command staff at 17:00, followed by dinner. - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Tereshkova. Flight: Vostok 6. Summary: Tereshkova meets with the command staff at 17:00, followed by dinner. She has a good appetite and is ready to go for her space flight..

1963 June 16 - .
  • Vostok 5 day 3 / Vostok 6 launch - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Gagarin; Bykovsky; Korolev; Tereshkova; Khrushchev. Flight: Vostok 5; Vostok 6. Spacecraft: Vostok. Bykovskiy slept well, his pulse was 54. The ground station could observe him via television - he made no motion while sleeping. On orbit 23 the cosmonaut was to communicate with earth, but no transmissions were received. Gagarin asks him why, and Bykovskiy simply replies that he had nothing to say and had already had a communications session with Zarya-1. But this was not true, they also reported no transmissions. At 07:00 he is asleep again, pulse 48-51. An hour later Korolev calls and discusses the impending launch of Vostok 6, 11 hours later.

    At 12:15 Tereshkova is on the pad. Her pulse skyrockets to 140 aboard the elevator to the top of the rocket. 10 to 15 minutes later she is in the capsule and testing radio communications with ground control. There are no problems with the spacecraft or launch vehicle during the countdown - everything goes perfectly, just as it did on 12 April 1961 when Yuri Gagarin became the first man in space. Tereshkova handles the launch and ascent to orbit much better than Popovich or Nikolayev according to her biomedical readings and callouts. Kamanin feels reassured that it was no mistake to select her for the flight.

    The launch of the first woman into space creates a newspaper sensation throughout the world. Direct orbit-to-orbit communications between Tereshkova and Bykovskiy are excellent. She talks to Khrushchev and the Soviet leadership soon thereafter. This was truly a great victory for Communism!


1963 June 16 - . 09:29 GMT - . Launch Site: Baikonur. Launch Complex: Baikonur LC1. LV Family: R-7. Launch Vehicle: Vostok 8K72K.
  • Vostok 6 - . Call Sign: Chayka (Seagull ). Crew: Tereshkova. Backup Crew: Solovyova; Ponomaryova. Payload: Vostok 3KA s/n 8. Mass: 4,713 kg (10,390 lb). Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Korolev; Tereshkova; Solovyova; Ponomaryova. Agency: Korolev. Program: Vostok. Class: Manned. Type: Manned spacecraft. Flight: Vostok 6. Spacecraft: Vostok. Duration: 2.95 days. Decay Date: 1963-06-19 . USAF Sat Cat: 595 . COSPAR: 1963-023A. Apogee: 166 km (103 mi). Perigee: 165 km (102 mi). Inclination: 64.9000 deg. Period: 87.80 min. Joint flight with Vostok 5. First woman in space, and the only Russian woman to go into space until Svetlana Savitskaya 19 years later. On its first orbit, Vostok 6 came within about five km of Vostok 5, the closest distance achieved during the flight, and established radio contact. Flight objectives included: Comparative analysis of the effect of various space-flight factors on the male and female organisms; medico-biological research; further elaboration and improvement of spaceship systems under conditions of joint flight. It was Korolev's idea just after Gagarin's flight to put a woman into space as yet another novelty. Khrushchev made the final crew selection. Korolev was unhappy with Tereshkova's performance in orbit and she was not permitted to take manual control of the spacecraft as had been planned.

1963 June 19 - .
  • Vostok 5 and Vostok 6 return to earth - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Tereshkova; Bykovsky; Korolev. Flight: Vostok 6; Vostok 5. Spacecraft: Vostok. In the morning Tereshkova manually oriented the spacecraft for re-entry easily and held the position for 15 minutes. She was very happy with the result. At 9:00 the state commission took their places in the command post. At 9:34:40 the retrofire command was sent to Vostok 6. After a few seconds, telemetry was received indicating that the engine burn was proceeding normally. The nerves of the commission members finally settled down, but Tereshkova did not call out each event as required. No report of successful solar orientation was received, no report of retrofire, and no report of jettison of the service module. Things remained very tense in the command post - no communications were received from the capsule at all. Knowledge that the spacecraft was returning normally were only received via telemetry, including the signal that the parachute opened correctly from above the landing site. Both spacecraft landed two degrees of latitude north of the aim point. It was calculated that this could have occurred by duplicate landing commands having been sent, but such a failure could not be duplicated in post-flight tests of ground equipment.

    Many errors occurred in the entire landing sequences, including actions of the VVS recovery forces. The conditions of the cosmonauts were only reported several hours after their landings. Big crowds gathered at both landing sites. Bykovskiy spent the night in Kustan, then left on 20 June aboard an Il-14 for Kuibyshev. Tereshkova spent her first night in Karaganda, then flew in an Il-8 to Kuibyshev. Many congratulatory phone calls were received from the Soviet leadership. Korolev declared he had no longer had the time to personally direct Vostok flights and wanted to hand the spacecraft over to the military for operational use. He could then concentrate on development of the Soyuz and Lunik spacecraft.


1963 June 19 - .
1963 June 20 - .
  • Vostok 5/6 cosmonaut debriefing - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Tereshkova; Bykovsky; Korolev. Flight: Vostok 6; Vostok 5. Spacecraft: Vostok. Korolev, Tyulin, and Rudenko left Tyuratam aboard an An-12, followed by 60 others (cosmonauts, officers, engineers) aboard an An-10. General Goreglyad requests that 'extraneous' staff remain in Kuibyshev, while the rest will proceed on to Moscow with Bykovskiy and Tereshkova. The aircraft arrive at 11:30 in Kuibyshev, then go to the debriefing building on the Volga river. There the debriefing of the two cosmonauts began at 13:00. After the debriefings, in the evening, Korolev took the cosmonauts for a trip on the Volga. Kamanin was infuriated - partying would ruin the post-flight medical tracking.

1963 June 21 - .
  • Vostok 5/6 cosmonaut debriefing - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Tereshkova; Bykovsky. Flight: Vostok 6; Vostok 5. Spacecraft: Vostok. Tomorrow morning the entire entourage would depart for Moscow. But on this day at the house on the Volga the cosmonauts were subjected to the attentions of seventy doctors, 100 correspondents, and a large additional number of KGB supervisors, military officers, and engineers. Tereshkova looked fresh and her first press conference with sixty correspondents went well - she made no big errors.

1963 June 22 - .
  • Vostok 5/6 cosmonaut welcome in Moscow - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Tereshkova; Bykovsky; Khrushchev. Flight: Vostok 6; Vostok 5. Spacecraft: Vostok. The big day for the cosmonauts. Departure for Moscow was scheduled for 10:30, with the meeting with Khrushchev at Vnukovo planned for 15:00. A sensitive issue - who would exit the aircraft first - Tereshkova, the main celebrity, or Bykovskiy, the senior cosmonaut and the first one launched? An enormous motorcade takes the entourage from the house on the Volga to the airport. Tereshkova and Kamanin are in the lead automobile, followed by Bykovskiy in the second, then the correspondents and so far in others, at five minute intervals. Huge crowds all along the route chant 'Valya! Valya! During the flight to Moscow Kamanin goes over Tereshkova's speech with her. When she and Bykovskiy get off the plane and march up to the tribune, a completely new life will begin for them. After the immense reception at the airport, they go with the leadership to a huge rally at Red Square.

1963 June 24 - .
  • Controversy over Tereshkova's performance - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Tereshkova; Korolev; Bykovsky; Keldysh; Tyulin; Yazdovskiy. Flight: Vostok 6; Vostok 5. The cosmonauts are prepared by Keldysh, Tyulin, and Korolev for their first big press conference. Yazdovskiy has inserted a paragraph in the official press release about Tereshkova's poor emotional state while in space. He claims she experienced overwhelming emotions, tiredness, and a sharply reduced ability to work and complete all of her assigned tasks. Kamanin takes him aside and asks him not to exaggerate her difficulties during the flight. She only had tasks assigned for the first day. When the flight was extended for a second, and then a third day, there was essentially nothing for her to do. The ground command did nothing to support her during those additional days. She certainly was never tired, never objected, but rather did all she could to complete fully the flight program.

1963 June 25 - .
  • Vostok 5/6 returned cosmonauts traditional meeting with Korolev - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Tereshkova; Korolev; Bykovsky. Flight: Vostok 6. Spacecraft: Vostok. The returned cosmonauts have the traditional meeting with Korolev at the design bureau and hand over their flight logs. The new cosmonaut group is presented as well. Korolev is in a good mood, and makes an especially long-winded speech. Tereshkova has to leave early, at 12:00, to attend yet another press conference and a woman's congress. These activities kept her going until 22:00 in the evening - a gruelling schedule indicative of what was to come.

1963 June 29 - .
  • Vostok 5/6 cosmonauts preparared for first international press conference. - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Tereshkova; Bykovsky; Keldysh; Serbin. Flight: Vostok 6; Vostok 5. Spacecraft: Vostok. At a meeting of the Central Committee, Tereshkova and Bykovskiy are taken through possible questions and correct replies by Serbin and Keldysh in preparation for their first international press conference. The training extends form 10 in the morning to 17:00 in the afternoon.

1963 July 2 - .
  • Yazdovskiy presses complaints about Tereshkova's performance - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Tereshkova; Yazdovskiy. Flight: Vostok 6. Doctor Yazdovskiy is insisting that Tereshkova is not being truthful about her flight experience. She handed out rations to on-lookers at the landing site in order to cover up the fact she did not eat enough during the flight. Kamanin considers the accusation a stupidity and indicative of the constant war going on between the flight surgeons and the cosmonauts. Tereshkova powerfully denies the accusation and defends herself well.

1963 July 3 - .
  • Cosmonaut controversies - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Tereshkova; Nelyubov; Anikeyev; Filatyev. Flight: Vostok 6; Vostok 5. A fight ensues over the release of the motion picture film of the flight. The Kremlin leadership still does not want to show the 'secret' launch cadres, rocket and spacecraft configurations, etc. There is also conflict with the planned dismissal of cosmonauts Nelyubov, Anikeyev, and Filatyev, with the flown cosmonauts using their connections with the political hierarchy to try and overturn the decisions of their military commanders. Finally, Tereshkova started a campaign to get a posthumous Hero of the Soviet Union medal for cosmonaut parachute trainer Nikitin. This particularly irritated the military command since as far as they were concerned Nikitin died due to his own error and killed another parachutist in the process. In no way was this deserving of a medal, but the award would convey significant financial benefits to his family and Tereshkova fought on. This was indicative of the quick turnaround celebrity brought to the cosmonauts - from obedient junior officers, anxious not to lose a chance for a spaceflight, to aggressive campaigners, willing to take on even members of the General Staff for what they thought was right.

1963 July 7 - .
  • Kamanin presses for specialised cosmonaut training - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Tereshkova; Bykovsky; Rudenko. Flight: Vostok 6; Vostok 5. In a two hour meeting with Rudenko, Kamanin attempts to convince him of the need for specialised cosmonaut training (qualifying as spacecraft commander, pilot, navigator, engineer, etc.) for future multi-crew spacecraft. Kamanin points out that in five to seven years they will be routinely flying 2 or 3 place spacecraft and need to start differentiating training now in order to be ready in time. However Rudenko remains unconvinced. Meanwhile Bykovskiy and Tereshkova are at the cosmonaut training centre, completing their flight reports. Kamanin faces difficulties in booking a hotel for the entire cosmonaut group in the Crimea in August --- he can't find any place with fifty vacancies, and concludes he'll have to split the group up. Pressure is coming from the Foreign Ministry for Tereshkova to make an early trip to Brazil, but she is already booked for two or three tours of friendly socialist countries beginning on 30 August and any additional trips can only be made after those are completed.

1963 July 10 - .
  • Odintsev pressing criticism of Tereshkova - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Tereshkova. Flight: Vostok 6. Odintsev is still trying to formally criticise Tereshkova for her flight performance. He charges that she was drunk when she reported to the launch pad and while in orbit was insubordinate, disregarding direct orders from the Centre. Kamanin knows this to be absolutely not true. Both cosmonauts and workers at the cosmonaut training centre report that is impossible to work with Odintsev any more - they want him out.

1963 July 12 - .
  • Korolev wants review of Tereshkova's flight performance - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Tereshkova; Bykovsky; Korolev. Flight: Vostok 6; Vostok 5. Kamanin discusses future cosmonaut book plans with writer Riabchikov. He is interrupted by a call from Korolev. Korolev wants Tereshkova and Bykovskiy in his office the following morning at 10 am sharp and he wants a full explanation for Tereshkova's poor self- samochuviniy on orbits 32 and 42, about her pvote, her poor appetite during the flight, and her failure to complete some assigned tasks. He blames Kamanin for providing her with inadequate training prior to the flight -- which Kamanin finds a joke since he had never received any support in the past from Korolev for his requests for more and better training of the cosmonauts in high-G and zero-G situations. Korolev had also never listened to any of Kamanin's complaints about the need to improve the living conditions for the cosmonaut on the Vostok spacecraft.

1963 July 13 - .
  • Bykovskiy and Tereshkova take their first road trip - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Tereshkova; Bykovsky. Flight: Vostok 6; Vostok 5. Bykovskiy and Tereshkova take their first road trip, to Yaroslavl. It is clear that Tereshkova is the star and Bykovskiy is in her shadow. Bykovskiy calls Kamanin - he asks that his wife and Tereshkova's brother be allowed to accompany them on their first foreign trip. Kamanin rejects the request.

1963 July 16 - .
  • Cosmonauts brainstorm improvements - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Tereshkova; Gagarin. Flight: Vostok 6. Gagarin is in the hospital to have his inflamed tonsils removed. A brainstorming session is held with the flown cosmonauts to identify problems encountered in flight and necessary improvements to training and flight operations to prevent them from reoccurring. The Military Soviet meets but the issue of Odintsev is not taken up -- his defenders in the hierarchy manage to suppress discussion of his removal.

1963 July 17 - .
  • Rudenko meets Odintsev - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Tereshkova; Rudenko. Rudenko meets Odintsev but does not give him the word of his removal directly. The decision will wreck Odintsev's career - his next assignment would have been command of an Air Army. Odintsev fretted over the number of stars on his uniform and fawned over academics -- he never looked after his own people, which would have prevented things coming to this.

1963 July 19 - .
  • Cosmonaut tour plans through December 1963. - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Tereshkova; Bykovsky. Flight: Vostok 6; Vostok 5. Summary: Cosmonaut tour plans are firmed up for September-December 1963.. Tereshkova and Bykovskiy are to be given a gruelling schedule, having to visit Bulgaria, Mongolia, Italy, Switzerland, Norway, Mexico, India, Ghana, and Indonesia. .

1963 July 27 - .
  • Korolev on future manned space flight plans. - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Tereshkova; Korolev; Gagarin. Flight: Vostok 7; Vostok 8; Vostok 9; Vostok 10. Another meeting is held with Korolev on future manned space flight plans. The same plans are presented as have been discussed for over a year - one animal flight, three manned flights for 10 days / to 1000 km. This issue must be resolved. Soyuz will not fly before 1965 - therefore Vostok must be flown or there will no Soviet manned spaceflights in 1964. In reality Soyuz is likely to be delayed, and 6 to 8 Vostoks are needed, not just 4. Equipment to be tested on the flights included soft landing equipment, a back-up retrofire engine, long-range communications systems, and scientific experiments. The physicians are too conservative - zero-G is obviously not as big an issue as thought. There should be nothing to prevent flight of non-pilot passengers. Korolev points out that if the cosmonaut is consumed by fear, or if any serious problem arises, as long as you can survive for an hour an emergency return to earth can be made. Within an hour the passenger will be in Cuba or Vladivostok. Kamanin would like Gagarin to be appointed next head of the cosmonaut centre, but this is opposed by Rudnev and Vershinin. Tereshkova has talked to Khrushchev - he's now supporting award of a Hero of the Soviet Union medal to Nikitin.

1963 August 2 - .
  • No further Soviet manned flights in 1963 - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Tereshkova; Korolev. Flight: Vostok 7. It is clear that there may be no Soviet manned flights in 1963, and certainly not in the spring. It is possible the unmanned biosat Vostok will be flown in the second half of 1963. Korolev's plate is full with other work -- Soyuz development, several Zenit reconnaissance satellite launches, lots of Luniks. Meanwhile Kamanin is completely occupied with cosmonaut tours and publicity. Over 200,000 cosmonaut fan letters have been received -- they can't handle them all, a special unit will have to be created just to handle the mail. The KGB has assigned Yevgeniya Pavlovna Kassirova to accompany Tereshkova on her travels. She is a good choice, has foreign travel experience and excellent English.

1963 August 11 - .
  • Kamanin picks up a new Volga automobile. - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Tereshkova; Bykovsky; Korolev. Flight: Vostok 6; Vostok 7; Vostok 8; Vostok 9; Vostok 10. Kamanin picks up a new Volga automobile. It cost him 5513 roubles, but one door doesn't fit and the trunk is scarred with excess hardened resin. Sukarno has asked for Tereshkova and Bykovskiy to visit Indonesia for two weeks in August, but this is impossible.

    In a three hour meeting Korolev goes over his future flight plans for Vostok. The first flight will be unmanned, with a biological payload, in February or March 1964. The flight is to last 10 or 11 days and take the specimens up to 600 to 1000 km altitude, into the lower reaches of the Van Allen radiation belts. This will be followed by three cosmonaut flights of ten days with significant military and scientific experiments. A new ground control system will be installed and tested to handle all in-flight emergencies. A new autonomous on-board navigation system will be flight tested. Korolev wants the military to take over conduct of future Vostok flights - they are taking up to much of his time and nerves. He has told this repeated to Khrushchev and Brezhnev without result. Meanwhile Kamanin lobbies within the military hierarchy for the removal of Odintsev. It is decided that the matter will be taken up at the next meeting of the Military Soviet.


1963 September 6 - .
  • Tereshkova accused of a scandal in Gorkiy. - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Tereshkova. Flight: Vostok 6. Summary: The militia claims that Tereshkova was drunk and created a scandal with a militia officer in Gorkiy. She categorically denies being drunk, but does admit to having a confrontation with a militia captain. .

1963 September 7 - .
1963 September 30 - .
  • Gagarin visits UNESCO. - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Gagarin; Tereshkova. Flight: Vostok 6. Summary: Gagarin visits UNESCO in Paris, followed by an interview with Paris Match. In the evening he and Kamanin visit Maxim's. On the same day Tereshkova departs for Cuba from Moscow. This is followed by a visit to Mexico. .

1963 October 4 - . LV Family: N1. Launch Vehicle: N1.
  • Gagarin identified as head of lunar cosmonauts - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Gagarin; Tereshkova. Program: Lunar L1. Class: Manned. Type: Manned spacecraft. Summary: Tereshkova announces in Havana that Gagarin head of lunar cosmonaut team..

1963 October 7 - .
  • Nikolayev to wed Tereshkova. - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Nikolayev; Tereshkova. Flight: Vostok 6. Kamanin meets with Nikolayev to discuss the timing for his enforced wedding to Tereshkova. Nikolayev is evasive, doesn't want to set a date, won't give a direct answer. Kamanin points out the wedding will be the subject of a government decree and a precise date must be set. The possible days are limited due to Tereshkova's heavy travel schedule. Nevertheless Nikolayev refuses to commit to a date in October.

1963 October 9 - .
  • Kamanin and Gagarin fly to Cuba to join Tereshkova. - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Tereshkova; Gagarin. Flight: Vostok 6. Summary: Kamanin and Gagarin fly to Cuba to join Tereshkova. Then over the next 13 days on to Mexico, USA, Canada, England, and East Germany. .

1963 October 29 - .
  • The issue of the Nikolayev/Tereshkova wedding has come to a head. - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Nikolayev; Tereshkova. The wedding has to be arranged with the VVS General Staff in accordance with the resolution of the Central Committee. Kamanin calls Tereshkova and Nikolayev and orders them to decide the issue - the MUST SET A DATE. He is getting ten phone calls a day about it and can resist no longer.

1963 October 30 - .
  • Only at 14:30 due Tereshkova and Nikolayev finally give in. - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Nikolayev; Tereshkova. Summary: Only at 14:30 due Tereshkova and Nikolayev finally give in. The wedding is set for three days later. 300 will attend the wedding, from Khrushchev on down. .

1963 October 31 - .
  • The highest leadership of the Soviet Union is busy making the Nikolayev/Tereshkova wedding arrangements. - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Nikolayev; Tereshkova. Summary: The highest leadership of the Soviet Union is busy making the Nikolayev/Tereshkova wedding arrangements. Tereshkova disappears for four hours during the day and doesn't show up for important meetings. .

1963 November 2 - .
  • Kamanin's phone is ringing off the hook. - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Nikolayev; Tereshkova. Summary: Kamanin's phone is ringing off the hook. Thousands want to attend the wedding - and it turns out there will be only space for 200. Kamanin is taking all the blame for this. .

1963 November 3 - .
  • Nikolayev/Tereshkova wedding - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Nikolayev; Tereshkova; Khrushchev. Summary: The wedding, attended by the top leadership of the Soviet Union, goes well. Afterwards the newlyweds continue the party with a friends-only group of 60 at Nikolayev's apartment..

1963 November 5 - .
  • Khrushchev gives Nikolayev and Tereshkova a new apartment - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Nikolayev; Tereshkova; Khrushchev. Khrushchev has given Nikolayev and Tereshkova a new apartment in Moscow. It is in a building normally reserved exclusively for the highest Communist Part members - Kutuzovskiy Prospect number 30132, Apartment 1013L. The apartment has 7 rooms and can be divided into two sections if they wish to live apart.

1963 November 16 - .
  • Kuznetsov is named the new chief of the cosmonaut training centre in replacement of Odintsev. - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Kuznetsov; Tereshkova.

1963 November 21 - .
  • Vostok 5/6 cosmonauts' Far East tour - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Tereshkova; Bykovsky. Flight: Vostok 5; Vostok 6. Spacecraft: Vostok. The cosmonauts are to depart on a Far East tour on 27 November, but scheduling is difficult because Sukarno calls to change the dates for Indonesia nearly daily. Kamanin develops four variant scenarios. The cosmonauts are to visit Sri Lanka, Burma, and Indonesia.

1963 November 28 - .
  • Bykovsky achieved lunar flight duration - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Bykovsky; Tereshkova. Flight: Vostok 5; Vostok 6. Summary: According to a review of Bykovsky's flight log, Bykovsky could have successfully completed a circumlunar flight. Tereshkova would have tired on such a flight - she ate poorly and slept too much..

1963 December 7 - .
1963 December 16 - .
  • Yerkina wedding - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Yerkina; Ponomaryova; Tereshkova; Korolev; Tsybin; Dementiev. Program: Soyuz; Lunar L1. Flight: Soyuz A-1; Soyuz A-2; Soyuz A-3; Soyuz A-4. Spacecraft: Soyuz A. The cosmonaut weds at the TsPK cosmonaut centre, and 80 guests attend. Of the female cosmonauts, only Ponomaryova is not yet married. However the next female flight will be made no earlier than 1965-1966. Tereshkova looks tired after her tour to Southeast Asia - and she's supposed to go to Ghana on 10 January! Korolev claims that the Soyuz schedule, as laid out in the resolution of 4 December 1963, is still realistic. He will have the first Soyuz flight in August 1964 and the second and third in September 1964. Ivanovskiy doesn't believe it will be possible to make any flights until 1965. Korolev and Tsybin disccuss Shcherbakov's design for a rocket-propelled high-altitude glider. This concept was supported by the VVS, but Dementiev was against it and it was killed in the bureaucracy.

1964 January 16 - .
  • Cosmonaut plans - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Tereshkova; Nikolayev; Bykovsky. Program: Vostok; Lunar L1. Flight: Soyuz A-1; Soyuz A-2; Soyuz A-3; Soyuz A-4; Vostok 7; Vostok 8; Vostok 9; Vostok 10; Vostok 11; Vostok 12; Vostok 13. Spacecraft: Vostok; Soyuz A. Kamanin is to put together a cosmonaut training plan for additional Vostok and new Soyuz flights by 1 February. Due to a lack of completed spacecraft, the next Vostok flight will not be possible until June 1964 at the earliest. The travel plans for the cosmonauts during the first half of 1964 are also to be drawn up. Tereshkova, Nikolayev, and Bykovsky are to tour India, Indonesia, Burma, Nepal, and Sri Lanka later in the year. Tereshkova will go to Ghana and Lebanon on 20 January, then to England on 31 January.

1964 January 23 - .
  • Gagarin travel plans - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Gagarin; Bykovsky; Tereshkova. Summary: Gagarin and Bykovsky will travel to Sweden and Norway in March. Tereshkova's tour of Ghana and Lebanon is an organisational mess, with impossible flight schedules..

1964 January 30 - .
  • Parachute training - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Tereshkova; Leonov; Korolev; Zverev. Program: Vostok. Flight: Vostok 7; Vostok 8; Vostok 9; Vostok 10. Spacecraft: Vostok. Kamanin prepares schedules for Tereshkova's visit to England on 4-10 February. Leonov's Vostok training group travels to Kirzhach to complete parachute training. Kamanin tries to pressure Korolev, Zverev, and Ivanovskiy to accelerate work on further Vostok flights.

1964 February 6 - . LV Family: Saturn I. Launch Vehicle: Saturn I.
  • American challenge - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Popovich; Tereshkova. Program: Lunar L1. Popovich has left on a tour of Australia, and Tereshkova is in England. The propaganda front of the Soviet space program is going well. But Kamanin is disquieted by the American testing of the Saturn I rocket. Its 17 tonne payload is more than double that of any Soviet booster. Greater efforts are needed, instead he is wasting his time editing Tereshkova's new book...

1964 February 18 - .
1964 March 21 - .
  • Voskhod commander assignment - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Nikolayev; Tereshkova; Khrushchev; Gagarin. Program: Voskhod. Flight: Voskhod 1. Spacecraft: Voskhod. Kamanin meets with Nikolayev, who briefs him on his goodwill tour of Soviet cities. Kamanin shows him a 200-rouble fine art book on the first space missions, of which he has received only six copies to distribute. Nikolayev would like one, but Kamanin says it is reserved for Tereshkova. Gagarin later briefs Kamanin on his tour of Western Europe. Gagarin is interested in commanding the Voskhod 1 mission, but Kamanin believes it is too risky. However the excuse he gives to Gagarin is that none of the flown cosmonauts are flight-ready due to constant publicity tours. Given only three months to prepare for the flight, the commander will have to be one of the unflown cosmonauts current in training. Later Kamanin formulates a position for the General Staff on the Voskhod flights. The VVS should promise full support for the Party's resolution, while pointing out the risks and the unreliability of the Voskhod design. Kamanin is told the support will be transmitted, but the qualifiers will not. Kamanin fumes that Khrushchev has given the go-ahead to proceed without being informed at all of the grave risks.

1964 April 8 - .
  • Press preparations - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Gagarin; Titov; Popovich; Nikolayev; Tereshkova; Bykovsky. Summary: Kamanin meets with 'The Six' (flown cosmonauts) and prepares them for the onslaught of scheduled appearances and press conferences scheduled for the upcoming Cosmonautics Day (April 12). .

1964 June 8 - .
  • Tereshkova's daughter - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Tereshkova. Intense preparations for Voskhod are given some relief when Tereshkova's daughter is born. Tereshkova begins labour at 15:00 on 7 June. On 8 June at 12:30 the doctors decide to use a caesarean section, and the girl, weighing 3.1 kg and 51 centimetres long, is brought into the world.

1964 August 17 - .
  • Cosmonauts on tour - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Gagarin; Titov; Bykovsky; Popovich; Tereshkova; Nikolayev. Since 14 August most of the cosmonauts have been out of town. Gagarin is in Leningrad, Titov and Bykovsky in Kiev, Popovich in Lipetsk (being trained on the MiG-21), the Voskhod crews in Arkhangelsk. Only Tereshkova and Nikolayev remain in Moscow. Then comes the news that Popovich has injured his leg in a fall on some stairs. The incident came after Popovich picked up two 15-year old girls in his Volga.

1964 August 18 - .
  • Aviation Day in Moscow - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Gagarin; Nikolayev; Tereshkova; Feoktistov. Program: Voskhod. Flight: Voskhod 1. Spacecraft: Voskhod. Summary: Kamanin is able only to offer Gagarin, Nikolayev, and Tereshkova for the presidium the day before. Later he hears that the special physician's panel is unanimous - Feoktistov will never be allowed to fly in space due to his condition..

1964 November 3 - .
  • Cosmonauts dispersed - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Komarov; Yegorov; Feoktistov; Gagarin; Nikolayev; Popovich; Tereshkova; Titov; Bykovsky; Biryuzov. Kamanin receives a phone call from Serbin in the Central Committee, demanding that all nine flown cosmonauts be present at the unveiling of a space obelisk in Moscow the next day, and be on the podium at Red Square on 7 November. This is impossible - the cosmonauts are dispersed on vacation, cure, or public relations missions. Gagarin, Nikolayev, Popovich, and Tereshkova are in Sochi, and after discussion, it seems they will be able to get back by the next day. But Titov and Bykovsky are in Odessa, and it will take them three days to get back. The VVS leadership is contacted to arrange special flights, otherwise all nine could only be gathered by 9-10 November.

    Kamanin receives the decree creating the new TsUKOS military organisation that will direct Soviet spaceflight. He is sure such a resolution would never have passed had Biryuzov not been killed in the plane crash. The VVS retains only its existing role of cosmonaut training.


1964 November 4 - .
  • Space obelisk unveiling - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Komarov; Yegorov; Feoktistov; Gagarin; Titov; Nikolayev; Popovich; Tereshkova; Bykovsky; Brezhnev. Gagarin, Titov, Nikolayev, Popovich, Tereshkova, and Bykovsky have all managed to make it to Moscow by plane, and they meet at TsPK at 13:00. Kamanin takes the unique opportunity of having them all together to discuss plans for their higher engineering education at the Zhukovskiy Academy, plans for construction of new quarters at the TsPK, and an overview of planned future missions based on recent resolutions. At 14:30 the group departs in four Volga automobiles for Moscow. The unveiling ceremony is at 16:00. Brezhnev, Kosygin, Mikoyan, and other bigwigs are there as well.

1964 December 24 - .
  • Cosmonauts back to work - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Nikolayev; Tereshkova. Kamanin uses his entire leave for the first time in his life. Part of the time, he was with some of the cosmonauts at Sochi. Their time there was spent without serious incidents. However despite Nikolayev's protestations that all is well, Kamanin has found out that Valentina Tereshkova is seriously ill, and that her forced marriage with Nikolayev was a serious mistake. She has declared that she does not want to live with Nikolayev any more, that he is a bad father to their daughter, he drinks too much, and that he spends all his time with his friends, speaking mainly in his native Chuvash, which she cannot understand.

1965 January 9 - .
  • Cosmonaut recruitment - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Korolev; Tereshkova; Ponomaryova; Solovyova; Yerkina; Kuznetsova. Program: Voskhod. Flight: Voskhod 5. Spacecraft: Voskhod. Kamanin would like to get going with the training of 40 additional cosmonauts from many disciplines in order to 'storm space'. Korolev is opposed. Kamanin is also trying to get new flights scheduled for his female cosmonauts. This is never mentioned in the planning of future flights. Korolev is opposed to sending any further women into space. Kamanin would like to see a two-woman Voskhod flight, or a woman making a spacewalk. Aside from Tereshkova, Ponomaryova and Solovyova are as qualified and talented as any of the male cosmonauts for such flights. Yerkina and Kuznetsova, although they have completed the course, are ruled out by weaknesses in technical areas or character, in Kamanin's opinion.

1965 January 11 - .
  • Tereshkova plans - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Nikolayev; Tereshkova. Summary: Nikolayev is behaving like the perfect husband in public to Tereshkova and his daughter. There are plans to send the couple to France in May 1965, as well as requests for Tereshkova to tour Algeria and Mongolia..

1965 March 5 - .
  • Voskhod plans - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Korolev; Khrunov; Tereshkova; Volynov; Beregovoi; Rudenko. Program: Voskhod. Flight: Voskhod 2; Voskhod 3; Voskhod 4; Voskhod 5; Voskhod 6. Spacecraft: Voskhod. Only on this day does Kamanin receive a copy of Korolev's "Preliminary Plan for Voskhod spacecraft (3KV and 3KD) series in 1965", issued in February. His plan is:
    • 3KV Number 5 - to be completed in June, launched by August, an unmanned biological flight with life forms, to be kept in orbit for 15-30 days, with experimental equipment in the cabin to monitor the organisms and a self-destruct system
    • 3KV Number 6 - to be completed in August, and flown by October on a 15-day mission with a two-man crew: a flight commander and scientist
    • 3KV number 7 - to be completed in December, and flown by April 1966 on a 15-20 day mission with a pilot and physician aboard. The spacecraft would also conduct artificial gravity experiments for 3-4 days of the flight
    • 3KD numbers 8 and 9 - a prime spacecraft and a backup, fitted with the airlock system. A spacecraft commander and pilot would make a flight or flights of 3 to 5 days. 2 or 3 spacewalks would be conducted on each flight, with the EVA cosmonaut using a manoeuvring apparatus to back away as far as 50 to 100 m from the spacecraft. Manually controlled landing of the capsule would also be demonstrated
    Kamanin is disappointed that there are few experiments of military significance in Korolev's plan. Kamanin calls Korolev to complain, and Korolev rightly replies that if the Ministry of Defence would authorise him to build more than nine spacecraft, then he could conduct other experiments... Meanwhile, Leonov is conducting his final practice sessions on exiting and re-entering the airlock aboard the Tu-104 zero-G aircraft. Khrunov will have his final sessions the next day.

    Kamanin is preparing the final press packet, with the cosmonaut biographies, which will be delivered to TASS but only released by them after confirmation that the spacecraft is in orbit. Later Kamanin and forty other guests, including hero-cosmonauts and future hero-cosmonauts, throw a party for Tereshkova's 28th birthday. There is tension in the room as the cosmonauts eye each other as competitors for the flights after Voskhod-2. Volynov is the leading candidate to command the next flight, and has already been a back-up four times, but Marshal Rudenko keeps blocking his selection for flight (Volynov is a Jew). Rudenko is pushing Beregovoi for the next flight, and everyone in the room knows it...


1965 March 29 - .
  • Cosmonaut travel plans - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Tereshkova; Nikolayev; Yegorov; Belyayev; Leonov; Gagarin. Program: Voskhod. Flight: Voskhod 1. Spacecraft: Voskhod. Tereshkova and Nikolayev are to travel to Algeria on 1 April, and Hungary on 2 April. Yegorov is going to Berlin to deliver a medical lecture. There is an avalanche of fan mail for Belyayev and Leonov. Kamanin believes that Leonov is moving into the pantheon with Gagarin and Tereshkova of top space heroes.

1965 April 2 - .
  • VVS role in space - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Belyayev; Leonov; Korolev; Brezhnev; Volynov; Katys; Beregovoi; Demin; Shatalov; Artyukhin; Rudenko; Tereshkova; Solovyova; Ponomaryova. Program: Voskhod; Lunar L1. Flight: Voskhod 3; Voskhod 4; Voskhod 5. Spacecraft: Soyuz A. Kamanin visits Korolev and tells him that in an upcoming meeting between the cosmonauts and Brezhnev and Kosygin, they are going to push for the VVS to be given a leading role in the exploration of space, including the necessity to improve the cosmonaut training centre with 8 to 10 simulators for Voskhod and Soyuz spacecraft, and development within the VVS of competence in space technology. Korolev is not opposed to this, but says he doubts the VVS leadership will support acquiring the new mission. Kamanin then indicates to Korolev his proposed crews for the upcoming Voskhod missions: Volynov-Katys, Beregovoi-Demin, Shatalov-Artyukhin. Kamanin hopes that Korolev will support Volynov as the prime candidate against Marshall Rudenko's favouring of Beregovoi. Kamanin then raises the delicate issue of Korolev's unfavourable opinion of Tereshkova. After her flight, Korolev angrily said: "I never want to have anything to do with these women again". Kamanin does not believe his remarks were meant seriously, and broaches the subject of training Soloyova and Ponomaryova for a female version of Leonov's spacewalk flight. Korolev says he will seriously consider the suggestion.

1965 April 16 - .
  • Voskhod female crew opposition - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Gagarin; Beregovoi; Shatalov; Tereshkova; Solovyova; Ponomaryova. Program: Voskhod. Flight: Voskhod 3. Spacecraft: Voskhod. Gagarin and the rest of the male cosmonauts, as many as other VVS officers, are opposed to Kamanin's plan for a female Voskhod flight. The first cosmonaut group are also opposed to appointment of Beregovoi and Shatalov to flight crews. Tereshkova has lost 5 kg and looks ill, but all the doctors say she is healthy.

1965 April 20 - .
  • Cosmonaut tours - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Tereshkova; Nikolayev. Program: Lunar L1. Flight: Soyuz 1; Soyuz 2A. Spacecraft: Soyuz A. The demand for cosmonaut appearances is constant; over 90% of such requests have to be denied. Tereshkova and Nikolayev are especially in demand - France wants them for two or three days, and there are also requests from Mongolia, Finland, Norway, Greece, Iran, Rumania, USA, Czechoslovakia, Yugoslavia, and many others. As far as progress on cosmonaut trainers, General Ponomaryov, who has no interests in space, is hampering development efforts. So far his interference has delayed completion of the docking trainer by six months.

1965 September 22 - .
  • Tereshkova manoeuvres - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Tereshkova; Ponomaryova; Korolev; Feoktistov. Program: Voskhod; Soyuz. Flight: Voskhod 3; Voskhod 5; Soyuz 1. Spacecraft: Soyuz 7K-OK. Tereshkova confides to Kamanin that Ponomaryova is not ready for her scheduled spaceflight. Kamanin does not believe it - he has heard it from no other cosmonauts, and he has spoken to Ponomaryova often over the years. Flight plans for 1965-1966 are reviewed. The pluses and minuses of each cosmonaut in advanced training for Voskhod flights is reviewed. The latest plan for the Voskhod-3 flight is for a 20-day flight with two cosmonauts (in an attempt to upstage the planned Gemini 7 14-day flight). This is followed by another tense phone call from Korolev, then Feoktistov complaining about inadequate VVS support for the Soyuz landing system trials at Fedosiya (no Mi-6 helicopter as promised; incorrect type of sounding rockets for atmospheric profiles; insufficient data processing capacity; inadequate motor transport). When Kamanin appeals to Finogenov on the matter, he is simply told that if "Korolev is unhappy with out facilities, let him conduct his trials elsewhere". Without the support of the VVS leadership, it is up to Kamanin to try to improve the situation using only his own cajoling and contacts.

1965 October 14 - .
  • Long range plans - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Nikolayev; Tereshkova; Leonov; Belyayev; Gagarin. Program: Voskhod. Flight: Voskhod 2. Spacecraft: Voskhod. The issue of ground support for manned lunar missions is discussed within the VVS. It will be necessary to have continuous and reliable tracking and communications of spacecraft in parking orbit prior to trans-lunar injection, in orbits with inclinations between 51 and 65 deg. Kamanin is tasked to develop a forecast and plan for necessary developments in the next 4 to 5 years. Later Kamanin considers cosmonaut travels. Nikolayev and Tereshkova are to go to Japan on 21 October. Leonov and Belyayev have returned from a tour of Bulgaria, Greece, East Germany, and Cuba, but they made several mis-statements during the tour which have been brought to Kamanin's attention. The issue of getting Gagarin back into cosmonaut training is again broached.

1965 November 16 - .
  • Cosmonaut travels - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Tereshkova; Belyayev; Leonov. Summary: Tereshkova is back from Japan; next she is to go to Italy on 21 November, then Denmark on 25 November. She is exhausted - Kamanin proposes sending Belyayev and Leonov to Denmark in her place..

1965 November 22 - .
  • Tereshkova trip to Italy cancelled. - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Tereshkova. Summary: It is called off the evening before, after the Italian president has downgraded the status of the visit..

1966 January 4 - .
  • Korolev visits Cosmonaut Training Center - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Gagarin; Titov; Popovich; Nikolayev; Tereshkova; Bykovsky; Komarov; Belyayev; Leonov; Brezhnev; Korolev. Korolev visits the centre, and spends more than six hours with the cosmonauts. However he says nothing about concrete flight plans. Afterwards Kamanin meets with Gagarin, Titov, Popovvich, Nikolayev, Tereshkova, Bykovsky, Komarov, and Belyayev (Leonov is at courses at the Academy). A profound pessimism prevails. Nothing has come of the letter to Brezhnev.

1966 January 14 - . LV Family: N1. Launch Vehicle: N1.
  • Korolev's death - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Volynov; Shonin; Beregovoi; Shatalov; Ponomaryova; Solovyova; Yerkina; Kuznetsova; Tereshkova; Korolev; Kuznetsov, Nikolai Fedorovich; Mishin; Petrovskiy. Program: Voskhod; Soyuz; Lunar L1. Spacecraft: Voskhod; Soyuz 7K-OK. Korolev dies at age 59 during what was expected to be routine colon surgery in Moscow. The day began for Kamanin with firm plans finally in place for the next three Voskhod and first three Soyuz flights. Volynov and Shonin will be the crew for the first Voskhod flight, with Beregovoi and Shatalov as their back-ups. That will be followed by a female flight of 15-20 days, with the crew begin Ponomaryova and Solovyova, with their back-ups Sergeychik (nee Yerkina) and Pitskhelaura (nee Kuznetsova). Tereshkova will command the female training group. Training is to be completed by March 15. After this Kamanin goes to his dacha, only to be called by General Kuznetsov around 19:00, informing him that Korolev has died during surgery.

    Kamanin does not minimise Korolev's key role in creating the Soviet space program, but believes the collectives can continue the program without him. In truth, Kamanin feels Korolev has made many errors of judgment in the last three years that have hurt the program. Mishin, Korolev's first deputy, will take over management of Korolev's projects. Kamanin feels that Mishin is a clever and cultured engineer, but he is no Korolev. Over the next three days the cosmonauts console Korolev's widow.

    Korolev's surgery was done personally by Petrovskiy, the Minister of Health. Korolev was told the surgery would take only a few minutes, but after five hours on the operating table, his body could no longer endure the insult, and he passed away.


1966 March 29 - .
1966 April 22 - . LV Family: R-7. Launch Vehicle: Soyuz.
  • Waiting on Voskhod - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Tereshkova; Popovich. Program: Voskhod. Flight: Voskhod 3. The search for the cause of the Molniya booster failure continues. A high oscillation vibration problem with the engine that has cropped up twice (but only on the test stand) has been cleared of responsibility. Tereshkova is going on a tour of Sweden. The cosmonauts' wives are preparing a letter denouncing Popovich for shutting down his wife's career and his abuse of her. Throughout the period April to May Kamanin is preoccupied with his wife, who is extremely ill in the hospital.

1966 April 29 - .
  • Cosmonaut travels - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Popovich; Titov; Leonov; Tereshkova. Program: Soyuz. Spacecraft: Spiral OS. Kamanin plans to make Popovich and Titov deputy commanders of cosmonaut detachments preparing for flight of the Soyuz 7K-OK and Spiral spaceplane. Leonov is back from a tour of France; Titov is preparing to go to Afghanistan, and Tereshkova to Armenia. But that night Titov does not come home - he is hanging out again with artists and other unacceptable types.

1966 August 10 - .
  • Soyuz schedule has been delayed again - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Mishin; Demin; Tereshkova; Gagarin; Tyulin. Program: Soyuz. Flight: Soyuz 1; Soyuz 2A; Soyuz s/n 3/4; Soyuz s/n 5/6. Spacecraft: Soyuz 7K-OK. Soyuz s/n 1 and 2 will be flown unpiloted by October 1966 Manned flights aboard Soyuz s/n 3, 4, 5, 6 will not take place until the first quarter of 1967. Later Mishin tours the cosmonaut training centre - the first time in his life he has visited the place. Mishin admires the new construction from Demin's balcony on the 11th floor of cosmonaut dormitory, then goes to Tereshkova's apartment on the seventh floor, and then Gagarin's apartment. Mishin insists on drinking a toast of cognac on each visit. Tyulin reveals this is a peace mission - they want to normalize relations and get on with cosmonaut training. At Fedosiya the auxiliary parachute of a Soyuz capsule failed to open during a drop test. Kamanin believes that the Soyuz parachute system is even worse than that of Vostok. His overall impression of the Soyuz is poor: the entire spacecraft looks unimpressive. The small dimensions of hatch, antiquated communication equipment, and inadequate emergency recovery systems are only the most noticeable of many discrepancies. If the automatic docking system does not function, then the entire Soviet space program will collapse in failure.

1966 October 13 - .
  • Almaz status review. - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Tereshkova; Kuznetsov; Chelomei. Program: Almaz. Spacecraft: Almaz OPS. Tereshkova departs for a tour of Belgium. General Kuznetsov accompanies a group of cosmonauts to visit Chelomei's design bureau to review progress on the Almaz military space station. Each station will remain in orbit for two years, with the crews being changed out every two months. Kamanin believes the ability of a crew to operate in zero-G for two months is not proven; he will assume the crew will have to be changed every two weeks. This would mean that per year of operation, 25 crews and 25 boosters for their delivery to the station would be required. If each crew could fly 2-3 times, per year, then even in this worse case scenario, 10 crews would be enough to keep the station manned.

1968 January 19 - .
  • Gagarin and Titov visit Tereshkova in the hospital. - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Gagarin; Titov; Tereshkova. Summary: In 1967, the average cosmonaut who had already flown in space spent 50 days on public relations activities and tours - a serious loss to them in terms of training for future missions..

1968 February 27 - .
  • Soviet on plan through 1975 for automated probes to the moon and planets. - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Keldysh; Barmin; Tereshkova. Spacecraft: DLB Lunar Base; Luna Ye-8; Luna Ye-8-5. Keldysh heads a Soviet on plans through 1975 for automated probes and space research of the moon and planets. Barmin attends, his interest being the relation of this work to his lunar base. Kamanin finds the plan not well thought out... Tereshkova sees Kamanin and tells him she cannot handle the stress of both political demands on her time and cosmonaut training. She wants Kamanin's assistance to get her out of political tasks.

1968 May 24 - .
  • Cosmonaut Africa tour with secret objectives. - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Tereshkova; Leonov. Program: Lunar L1. Tereshkova is fighting against her appointment to the Committee of Soviet Women with the requirement for constant tours, appearances, committee sessions, and so on. He has gone to see Suslov about it. Meanwhile the Communist Central Committee and the Soviet Ministers are having a fight over the dates for the planned cosmonaut tour of Africa (the secret objective is to give the cosmonauts training in recognition of southern hemisphere constellations in preparation for lunar missions). Leonov is involved in sending mixed signals to the leadership.

1968 May 28 - .
  • Tereshkova has a heart-to-heart with Kamanin. - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Tereshkova. Program: Soyuz. Summary: How is she supposed to have time for space training, her engineering classes at the test pilot academy, flight training, herself, and her daughter -- and still the incessant demands from the state for political and public relations activities?.

1968 September 20 - .
  • Kamanin hold a cosmonaut meeting. - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Tereshkova; Titov; Beregovoi. Program: Lunar L1. Spacecraft: Soyuz 7K-L1. Tereshkova is having political problems. Titov is to go to Mexico, although he still is making errors of judgement which make it questionable whether he can be trusted on foreign tours. Beregovoi is to complete his cosmonaut examinations on 27 September, and then will be certified for flight.

1968 December 15 - .
  • Cosmonauts graduate. - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Nikolayev; Leonov; Popovich; Bykovsky; Khrunov; Gorbatko; Zaikin; Volynov; Shonin; Ponomaryova; Solovyova; Tereshkova; Kuznetsova; Yerkina; Titov; Gagarin. Nikolayev, Leonov, Popovich, Bykovsky, Khrunov, Gorbatko, Zaikin, Volynov, and Shonin all receive their diplomas from the Zhukovskiy Test Pilot Engineering Academy. Khrunov graduates with honours. All of them began training for a lunar landing on January 8. Titov and Gagarin will complete their studies for the diploma in May. Ponomareva and Solovyova willl graduate in the second half of 1968, leaving only Tereshkova, Kuznetsova, and Yerkina. Tereshkova has had her appendix removed in surgery at the Vishevskiy Centre. The surgery went well.

1969 June 2 - .
  • Tereshkova receives her degree from test pilot engineering school. - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Tereshkova. Summary: Her thesis was 'Braking engines for orbital aircraft'. Kamanin is very proud of her - six years after her flight, the factory worker has become an erudite engineer and a holder of a degree of the highest international class..

1969 June 9 - .
  • Delegates from the international Communist conference tour the Gagarin Centre. - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Tereshkova. Program: Lunar L1. Spacecraft: Soyuz 7K-OK; Soyuz 7K-L1. Summary: They are shown the Soyuz, L1, and Soyuz docking simulators. Tereshkova speaks on the future in space. The delegates view the living areas of Star City, visit the Gagarin Museum, and are shown the film 'Four in Orbit'..

1969 July 5 - .
  • Borman tours the officer's quarters at the Gagarin Centre. - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Titov; Borman; Tereshkova; Shatalov; Beregovoi; Popovich; Volynov. Flight: Apollo 8; Soyuz 4/5. On the key day of his visit to Russia, Tereshkova shows Mrs Borman around, while Shatalov accompanies Mr Borman. Borman shows the cosmonauts a film on his Apollo 8 mission and answers questions. Then the Soviets show him exce3rpts from the films 'Road to Space' (on the Gagarin mission) and 'Four in Space' (on the Soyuz 4/5 mission). Beregovoi gives the Bormans a model of the Vostok, Popovich a photo album, and Titov guides them through the museum. In the evening twenty attend a dinner where toasts are exchanged in the Russian manner. Borman and Volynov exchange wristwatches. Borman presented Titov with the watch he received from President Johnson after the Gemini 7 mission - it is to be put in the museum. Eight hours are spent in total at Star City. Kamanin finds Borman to be disciplined and precise. He is at the same time a skilled orator, diplomat, and born politician.

1969 August 30 - .
  • Beregovoi vs Kuznetsov - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Beregovoi; Kuznetsov, Nikolai Fedorovich; Tereshkova. Summary: Beregovoi has been the first deputy of NII TsPK for four months, but in fact has only worked ten days in that time. General Kuznetsov won't let him get involved in detail work. Tereshkova went on a propaganda trip to Afghanistan yesterday..

1969 September 3 - .
  • L3 Trainer and Female Cosmonauts - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Ponomaryova; Solovyova; Yerkina; Kuznetsova; Tereshkova; Ustinov; Smirnov; Pashkov. Program: Lunar L3; Soyuz. Spacecraft: Soyuz 7K-LOK. Meeting of Kamanin with S G Donevskiy. The L3 trainer will not be finished until May 1970 - and the current schedule for the first manned L3 launch is December 1970! But in any case Kamanin assesses the latter date as unrealistic -- there is no rocket or spacecraft in being yet. Later in the day Efimov, Moroz, and Kamanin meet with the female cosmonauts - Ponomaryova, Solovyova, Yerkina, and Kuznetsova. They advise them that despite the letter to the Central Committee asking for an all-female Soyuz flight, it has been rejected. Ustinov, Smirnov, and Pashkov are all opposed to the idea, as are MOM, MAP, AN, and VVS. Kamanin believes the whole female cosmonaut concept was a mistake. Flying Tereshkova in the first place started the whole thing, but now there is no follow-up.

1969 September 12 - .
  • Shatalov and Yeliseyev are progressing well for their Soyuz 8 flight. - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Shatalov; Yeliseyev; Nikolayev; Tereshkova; Ustinov. Program: Soyuz. Flight: Soyuz 6; Soyuz 7; Soyuz 8. Kamanin advises Nikolayev his chances of being named to fly Soyuz 8 are very low. Tereshkova arrives at Kamanin's office in the evening. She is infuriated that her husband is not to be allowed to fly the mission. She says she will take the matter to Ustinov and Polanskiy. Kamanin tells her that would be a mistake.

1969 October 27 - .
  • Cosmonauts tours. - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Beregovoi; Feoktistov; Tereshkova; Popovich; Khrunov; Titov. Program: Soyuz. Flight: Soyuz 6; Soyuz 7; Soyuz 8. Kamanin assigns cosmonauts to upcoming foreign propaganda tours. Beregovoi and Feoktistov are to go to the United States, Tereshkova to Hungary, Popovich to France, Khrunov to Odessa. Titov will not be given this privilege because of his numerous automobile accidents, run-ins with the militia, and motorcycle habit.

1969 December 31 - .
  • 1969 in retrospect. - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Tereshkova; Mishin; Keldysh; Smirnov; Ustinov; Grechko, Andrei; Kutakhov. Program: Soyuz; Lunar L3. Tereshkova is on a tour of Jordan and Syria. Kamanin muses over the year 1969. He is able to rationalise that it wasn't a bad year -- they flew 9 cosmonauts on five space missions. But of course they lost the moon to the Americans. He blames Mishin, Keldysh, Smirnov, and Ustinov for this. But he also blames the attitude of the Ministry of Defence and VVS. This is indicated by the total indifference to civilian space projects of Grechko and Kutakhov. They don't support the Gagarin Centre, or Kamanin's request for 10 additional Soyuz flights in earth orbit. Kamanin views the L3 spacecraft and mission scenario as unsafe. What is needed is a new spacecraft, launched by two N1 boosters, that will take a crew of 3 to 5 to the moon.

1970 February 19 - .
  • Tereshkova never to fly again - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Tereshkova. Kamanin has a run-in with Tereshkova over her automobile benefit. Kamanin finds Tereshkova capricious and touching, but also sometimes downright rude. She is also very energetic .... and powerful (though her leadership of the Committee of Soviet Women). She badgers Kamanin after every cosmonaut meeting, as to when another female flight will be scheduled. Kamanin knows from his fights with the leadership on the issue that this will never happen.

1970 March 18 - .
  • Shonin on report - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Nikolayev; Tereshkova; Shonin; Titov. Program: Soyuz. Flight: Soyuz 9. Nikolayev and crew go to Sochi. Tereshkova is back from sick leave, and she goes there as well. Kamanin meets with Shonin, the topic: many bad reports he has received of Shonin's behaviour since Soyuz 6. He tells him to watch out, or he'll end up on a five-year flight suspension like Titov.

1970 May 5 - .
  • Tereshkova promoted to colonel. - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Tereshkova; Shatalov; Kutakhov. Kamanin notes that on 30 April decree number 0635 of the Ministry of Defence promoted Tereshkova to Colonel. She has risen in rank from Lieutenant to Colonel in only eight years, a record result for a woman (it normally takes more than ten years). Many within the VVS opposed the promotion, but Kamanin feels she deserves it and has served her country well on the Committee of Soviet Women. Later Kamanin has a filmed interview as part of a Riabchikov television project. Shatalov's trip to Cuba has proceeded well - he met Castro several times. Kutakhov is in the hospital.

1970 May 7 - .
  • Tereshkova's political duties. - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Tereshkova. Summary: Tereshkova did well at a meeting of Soviet Women commemorating the 25th Anniversary of the Defeat of Fascist Germany. She is to attend similar functions on 8 and 9 May..

1970 May 19 - .
  • Soyuz 9 crew departs for Baikonur. - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Nikolayev; Tereshkova; Sevastyanov. Program: Soyuz. Flight: Soyuz 9. Kamanin leaves for Tyuratam at 09:00 with 13 others aboard an Il-18 from Chkalov Airfield. The group included the 'space family' - Nikolayev, his wife Tereshkova, and their daughter Aleuka - with extensive photographic and film coverage. After the 10 hour flight, Kamanin goes to the 'Alley of Heroes' at Area 17 of the cosmodrome. Here each crew plants a tree before departing for space. The 11 first trees planted have all grown well, and are now 6 m tall with large crowns. Sevastyanov plants the 22nd tree. After a meeting of the State Commission, everyone watches an Italian movie, 'The Owl Appears at Day' - a story of murder in Sicily, terror against women, and the corruption of the Mafia (apparently a remake of the classic 'M').

1970 June 2 - .
  • Soyuz 9 Day 2 - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Nikolayev; Sevastyanov; Tereshkova; Shatalov. Program: Soyuz. Flight: Soyuz 9. Spacecraft: Soyuz 7K-OK. At 09:00 the State Commission members and 36 military officers board an aircraft to return to Moscow. Kamanin, the Soyuz 9 back-up crews, Kuznetsov, Shatalov, and 14 other officers board an Il-18 for the flight to mission control at Yevpatoriya. Conversation aboard the flight is about the weather, football - nothing about space. After four hours the plane arrives at Saki. The first communications session with Soyuz 9 is with Issuriysk at 15:40. In a three-minute conversation the crew confirms that all is normal. At 19:00 the first of the daily landing commission meetings takes place. This commission's role is to assess the flight status and to establish contingency plans for the next day in case an emergency return to earth is required.

    In the evening Kamanin calls Tereshkova, and promises to tell Nikolayev that she and Aleuka were fine, worried, to kiss him, and the looked forward to meeting him on his return. On 8 June Aleuka will be six years old, and Tereshkova would like to fly to Yevpatoriya to give her a surprise communications session with her father. At 21:25 Kamanin relays the news from his family to Nikolayev during a pass over Yevpatoriya. Kamanin observes that the tracking station is not suited to serve as mission control over a long spaceflight. There is no transport, and no recreational facilities. The only diversions are gymnastics, chess, and billiards. Furthermore there seem to be a lot of unnecessary staff at the command point.


1970 June 4 - .
  • Soyuz 9 Day 4 - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Nikolayev; Sevastyanov; Tereshkova; Mishin; Tregub. Program: Soyuz. Flight: Soyuz 9. Spacecraft: Soyuz 7K-OK. There are a total of 500 staff at Yevpatoriya for the mission, including 53 representatives from the VVS, 6 military cosmonauts, and 3 civilian cosmonauts. Mishin returns to Moscow, leaving Tregub in his place. In the afternoon there is a problem with the control of the spacecraft's solar cells. On the 47th orbit Sevastyanov reports that one solar panel is energised, but only generating 26 amps. This could only mean that the automatic control of the solar panels was not working. On the second day the crew had to engage and disengage the solar batteries 12 times manually. After the 15th manual session it became clear that the mission could last only eight days before the batteries would run down. In the orbit of Soyuz 9 in June, the night lasts 40 minutes. On the previous flight, in October, it lasted only 10 minutes and this would not have been a problem. The crew is told to revolve the spacecraft at 0.5 deg/sec around the long axis. By this method the spacecraft remains fully oriented towards the sun, and the batteries don't have to work so long on the night passes. The cosmonauts do not report any unpleasant sensations from the rotation. At the 23:25 communications sessions the cosmonauts report that their appetites are good and they are sleeping well.

1970 June 5 - .
  • Soyuz 9 Day 5 - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Nikolayev; Sevastyanov; Tereshkova. Program: Soyuz. Flight: Soyuz 9. Spacecraft: Soyuz 7K-OK. At 08:40 Kamanin discusses the solar battery problem in a communications section with the cosmonauts. Telemetry shows the system is generating 25.6 to 26.0 V. There will be an emergency situation if the voltage drops to 23 to 24 V - in that case the crew must land within 1.5 orbits of the earth, or two hours. They would likely have to land out of tracking range of Soviet units. The crew gets the spacecraft back into its solar orientation roll on the sixth attempt. At 18:00 clear communications are again obtained with the capsule via Vesna (Khabarovsk and Alma Alta). Nikolayev reports that when oriented to the sun, the system generates 26 V instead of the 31 V it should be generating. A long technical discussion ensues. It is finally decided that the automatic system is actually working correctly, but that Sevastyanov is confusing the ammeter and voltmeter readings (which are displayed on one instrument). Later Kamanin talks to Tereshkova. She will fly via An-24 to Yevpatoriya on 7 June with her daughter.

1970 June 7 - .
  • Soyuz 9 Day 7 - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Nikolayev; Sevastyanov; Tereshkova. Program: Soyuz. Flight: Soyuz 9. Soyuz 9's environmental control system is working well. Tereshkova and her daughter arrive at the command point at 14:40 after landing at the airfield at 12:00. The landing commission meets in the evening to consider contingency landings. It is reported that the crew is medically in better shape on Day 6 than Day 1, according to telemetry. In fact they are doing so well, extension of the flight to 20 days duration is discussed. Between 20:00 and 20:30 Tereshkova and her daughter communicate via radio and television with Nikolayev aboard Soyuz 9.

1970 June 8 - .
  • Soyuz 9 Day 8 - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Nikolayev; Sevastyanov; Tereshkova. Program: Soyuz. Flight: Soyuz 9. Summary: During the day Tereshkova has a meeting with a Young Pioneers Group. In the evening she and Nikolayev enjoy another communications session together..

1970 June 9 - .
  • Soyuz 9 Day 9 - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Nikolayev; Sevastyanov; Tereshkova. Program: Soyuz. Flight: Soyuz 9. Summary: Tereshkova and her daughter return to Moscow. The landing commission meets at 20:00. The cosmonauts' activity level seems to be declining - they are drinking little water and their oxygen consumption has declined..

1970 June 26 - .
  • Soyuz 9 crew improving. - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Nikolayev; Sevastyanov; Tereshkova. Program: Soyuz. Flight: Soyuz 9. Summary: The Soyuz 9 crew are still suffering from the effects of their flight, but getting better each day. Tereshkova was taken ill last night..

1970 June 30 - .
  • Soyuz 9 crew still very weak. - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Nikolayev; Sevastyanov; Tereshkova. Program: Soyuz. Flight: Soyuz 9. Ten days after their 18-day flight, the Soyuz 9 crew can still only work 3 to 4 hours a day. They can only take two short walks daily and tire quickly. Their pulse, temperature, blood pressure fluctuate from day to day, often being in the range of ill people. Meanwhile the head army physician examines Tereshkova, and prescribes a one-week spa cure.

1970 July 10 - .
  • Indian General Lal tours space facilities. - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Nikolayev; Sevastyanov; Tereshkova. Summary: The press conference behind them, Nikolayev and Tereshkova leave for Leningrad, and then on to Sochi for recuperation. General Lal from India tours Soviet space facilities. Smirnov proposes cooperation with India in space technology development..

1970 September 16 - .
  • Cosmonaut meeting. - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Nikolayev; Tereshkova. Kamanin returned from summer vacation on 14 September. In his first meeting with the cosmonauts, the centrifuge problem is reviewed. The USSR has not a single centrifuge over 8 m radius, while the Americans have six in the 14-20 m range, and have begun building one with a 46 m arm. Nikolayev will tour West Germany from 4 October, and Tereshkova will be in the USA from 18 October.

1970 September 25 - .
  • Cosmonaut flight training. - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Nikolayev; Tereshkova. More controversy over Mishin and Gorshkov's new sea recovery plan for the L3. The Seregin Flight Regiment of the cosmonaut training centre flew 4002 hours in the first nine months of 1970, of which 900 were at night and 1307 were in poor weather. The cosmonauts themselves flew 1987 hours.

1970 November 16 - .
  • Nikolayev-Tereshkova marital problems a VVS management issue - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Nikolayev; Tereshkova. Kamanin has a difficult and unpleasant conversation with Tereshkova. She and her mother have written to generals in the chain of command over Kamanin several times about Nikolayev's bad behaviour. This was never mentioned to Kamanin. He doesn't know what to do about the quarrels between the 'space couple'.

1970 November 26 - .
  • Kutakhov opposes expanded VVS role in space. - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Kutakhov; Nikolayev; Tereshkova. Spacecraft: Spiral OS. Kutakhov visits the cosmonaut training centre. He is still against the VVS being involved in manned spaceflight. He tells Kamanin that Kamanin's draft resolution on the use of space for reconnaissance, communications, navigation, and piloted flight is not appropriate for 1971 - more like 1980. In the evening, Kamanin talks to Nikolayev about Tereshkova's complaints. He claims that in seven years he has only had two or three of these blow-ups with her. He blames her in-laws for starting the whole thing and keeping the bad feelings going.

1970 November 27 - .
  • VVS considers role in space. - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Nikolayev; Tereshkova; Sevastyanov. Program: Almaz. Spacecraft: Spiral OS; Almaz OPS. The leaders of the VVS meet to consider the role of the Air Force in space and Kamanin's draft resolution. Frolov wants to form a VVS regiment for Almaz operations. Molzhavtsev wants to emphasize full use of unmanned satellites for support of the VVS (communications, navigation, reconnaissance). Later in the meeting V V Kuznestov discusses with Kamanin plans for a planned Nikolayev-Tereshkova-Sevastyanov trip to Egypt in January 1971. It has to be planned around opening ceremonies for the Aswan Dam.

1971 January 23 - .
  • Meeting of VVS leadership. - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Tereshkova. Spacecraft: Spiral OS. Kamanin reviews his public relations operations. In ten years the cosmonauts have made 6,000 speeches and gone on 200 publicity tours. Tereshkova is the most in demand. 30 documentary films have been produced, as well as hundreds of books and brochures. The Star City Museum had 13,000 visitors in 1970.

1971 March 4 - . LV Family: N1; UR-700.
  • N1/L3 Expert Commission - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Tereshkova; Keldysh; Mishin; Kuznetsov, Nikolai Fedorovich. Program: Lunar L3. Spacecraft: Soyuz 7KT-OK; LK-700; Krechet. Pushkin and Kuznetsov brief Kamanin on the results of the N1/L3 expert commission. They found that the N1/L3 is unreliable and that the design needs to be fundamentally re-examined. Therefore the Soviet Ministers and Central Committee passed a decree that the commission must determine by 1 May 1971 what to do with the lunar project. Kamanin's opinion: abandon the N1-L3, modify Chelomei's UR-700 design to replace it, and design a new lunar landing spacecraft for missions in 1974-1975. Mishin is afraid of such a solution. Kamanin believes that the commission, headed by Keldysh, will finally recommend continued development and flight of Mishin's bad booster and even worse spacecraft. It is true that the N1 design has been substantially reworked in the last 18 months, but Kamanin believes it to be fundamentally flawed and that nothing can make it reliable.

    After Mishin pushed his Indian Ocean recovery plan for the L3, the VVS insisted on sea trials of the capsule. These showed the cosmonauts had to get out within 30 to 35 minutes before the valves to the interior started leaking seawater. The L3 is also unsafe due to the EVA method of transfer to the LK of a single unassisted cosmonaut. The Krechet spacesuit is very bulky and unmanoeuvrable.

    Prague wanted Gagarin's widow for International Women's Day.since Tereshkkova couldn't go, but she wants no part of public appearances.


1971 March 31 - .
  • Cosmonaut delegates to Communist Party Congress. - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Nikolayev; Beregovoi; Shatalov; Yeliseyev; Tereshkova. The Communist Party Congress is addressed for five hours by Brezhnev. There are 5,000 delegates, including 101 international delegations from 90 countries. Brezhnev promises that the imperialist lackeys will be wiped out one by one until communism triumphs over the whole planet. Five cosmonauts are delegates - Nikolayev, Beregovoi, Shatalov, Yeliseyev, and Tereshkova.

1971 July 4 - . LV Family: N1. Launch Vehicle: N1.
  • Soyuz 11 failure investigation - . Nation: USSR. Related Persons: Tereshkova; Dobrovolsky; Patsayev; Volkov; Severin. Program: Lunar L3; Salyut. Flight: Soyuz 11. Spacecraft: Soyuz 7KT-OK; Soyuz 7K-T. This was a very difficult time for TsKBEM. All work at the bureaus came to a complete halt after the loss of Soyuz 11 and N1 6L. Simultaneous expert commissions investigated the loss of N1 6L and Soyuz 11. TsKBEM was seen as responsible for every failure. A virtually legal process ensued to fix guilt. Every design decision was examined and questioned. Additional Details: here....

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