Encyclopedia Astronautica
NEC


Japanese manufacturer of spacecraft. Nippon Electric Corporation, Japan.

AKA: Toshiba Corp.

More... - Chronology...


Associated Countries
Associated Spacecraft
  • Marine Observation Satellite Japanese earth sea satellite. 2 launches, 1987.02.19 (MOS-1) to 1990.02.07 (MOS-1b). The MOS 1A and 1B satellites, also known as Momo 1A and 1B, were Japan's first Earth resources satellites. More...
  • Haruka Japanese radio astronomy satellite. One launch, 1997.02.12. The Muses B satellite was renamed 'Haruka', meaning 'Far-away', after launch. It formed the spacesegment of the VLBI Space Observatory Program. More...
  • Kakehashi Japanese communications satellite. One launch, 1998.02.21. Name means 'Bridge', was called Communications and Broadcasting Experimental Test Satellite (COMETS) before launch. It contained Ka-band communications and inter-satellite data relay payloads. More...
  • MDS Japanese technology satellite. One launch, 2002.02.04. MDS (Mission Demonstration Satellite) was a technology demonstrator to flight-qualify commercial subsystems. More...
  • Kirari Japanese communications satellite. One launch, 2005.08.23. Optical Inter-Orbit Communications Engineering Test Satellite. Its laser communications experiment was be used in with ESA's Artemis geostationary satellite. More...
  • Daichi Japanese civilian surveillance radar satellite. One launch, 2006.01.24. Advanced Land Observing Satellite, which carried an L-band synthetic aperture radar, an optical 2. More...
  • Akari Japanese infrared astronomy satellite. One launch, 2006.02.21, Astro F (Akari). Carried a 0.67m-diameter liquid-helium-cooled infrared telescope with detectors ranging from the near infrared to 60 and 170 micron channels in the far IR. More...

See also
Associated Programs
  • Muses Mu Space Engineering Satellites (launched on Japanes Mu series launch vehicles) pioneered new satellite technologies, including lunar flyby interplanetary injection, aerobraking, and large structure deployment. More...

NEC Chronology


1997 February 12 - . 04:50 GMT - . Launch Site: Kagoshima. Launch Complex: Kagoshima M-V. LV Family: M-V. Launch Vehicle: M-V. LV Configuration: M-V M-V-1.
  • Haruka - . Payload: MUSES B. Nation: Japan. Agency: ISAS. Manufacturer: NEC. Program: Muses. Class: Astronomy. Type: X-ray astronomy satellite. Spacecraft: Haruka. USAF Sat Cat: 24720 . COSPAR: 1997-005A. Apogee: 21,415 km (13,306 mi). Perigee: 569 km (353 mi). Inclination: 31.4000 deg. Period: 379.30 min.

1998 February 21 - . 07:55 GMT - . Launch Site: Tanegashima. Launch Complex: Tanegashima Y. LV Family: H-2. Launch Vehicle: H-II. LV Configuration: H-II H-II-5F.
  • Kakehashi - . Payload: COMETS. Nation: Japan. Agency: NASDA. Manufacturer: Toshiba; NEC. Class: Communications. Type: Civilian communications satellite. Spacecraft: Kakehashi. USAF Sat Cat: 25175 . COSPAR: 1998-011A. Apogee: 17,727 km (11,015 mi). Perigee: 1,033 km (641 mi). Inclination: 30.1000 deg. Period: 328.10 min. Kakehashi, meaning 'Bridge', was called Communuications and Broadcasting Experimental Test Satellite (COMETS) before launch. It contained Ka-band communications and inter-satellite data relay payloads. Premature shutdown 44 seconds into the H-II second stage second burn put the satellite into a much lower than planned orbit. The on-board Unified Propulsion System was used to raise it to a more useful orbit.

1998 July 3 - . 18:12 GMT - . Launch Site: Kagoshima. Launch Complex: Kagoshima M-V. LV Family: M-V. Launch Vehicle: M-V. LV Configuration: M-V M-V-3.
  • Nozomi - . Mass: 258 kg (568 lb). Nation: Japan. Agency: ISAS. Manufacturer: NEC. Class: Mars. Type: Mars probe. Spacecraft: Nozomi. USAF Sat Cat: 25383 . COSPAR: 1998-041A. Apogee: 489,381 km (304,086 mi). Perigee: 703 km (436 mi). Inclination: 27.3000 deg. Period: 20,910.00 min. Originally known as Planet-B; renamed Nozomi ('Hope') after launch. The third stage and payload entered a 146 x 417 km x 31.1 deg parking orbit. The KM-V1 kick (fourth) stage then fired to place the spacecraft into a circumlunar 359 x 401491 km x 28.6 deg orbit. Nozomi made multiple lunar and Earth gravity assist passes to increase its energy for solar orbit insertion and the cruise to Mars.. The spacecraft used a lunar swingby on 24 September and another on 18 December 1998 to increase the apogee of its orbit. It swung by Earth on 20 December at a perigee of about 1000 km. The gravitational assist from the swingby coupled with a 7 minute burn of the bipropellant engine put Nozomi into an escape trajectory towards Mars. It was scheduled to arrive at Mars on 11 October 1999 at 7:45:14 GMT, but the Earth swingby left the spacecraft with insufficient acceleration and two course correction burns on 21 December used more propellant than planned, leaving the spacecraft short of fuel. The new plan is for Nozomi to remain in heliocentric orbit for an additional four years and encounter Mars at a slower relative velocity in December 2003.

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