Encyclopedia Astronautica
KARI


South Korean agency overseeing development of rockets and spacecraft. Korea Aerospace Research Institute, Korea South.

More... - Chronology...


Associated Countries
  • Korea South South Korea became familiar with large-scale rocketry through maintenance and modification activities on American-supplied Honest John and Nike Hercules tactical missiles. By the 1990's Korea had developed an independent capability to manufacture solid propellant rocket motors of up to one tonne mass. In 1990 KARI was funded to build the first indigenous sounding rockets, flown as the KSR-I and KSR-II. In December 1997 KARI was allowed to proceed with development of liquid oxygen/kerosene rocket motor for an orbital launcher, but this was abandoned when the South Korean government decided it wanted to be among the top ten spacefaring nations by 2015. The existing program was too limited in growth potential to allow that. Therefore it was decided to leapfrog the technology by contracting with Russian companies. First launch of the KSLV-I launch vehicle from the new space centre took place in 2010. More...

Associated Spacecraft
  • KOMPSAT South Korean communications technology satellite. One launch, 1999.12.21. KOMPSAT was the first joint spacecraft development project for the South Korean aerospace agency KARI (Korea Aerospace Research Institute). More...
  • STSat South Korean technology satellite. First launch 2003.09.27. More...
  • KOMPSAT-2 South Korean civilian surveillance satellite. One launch, 2006.07.28, Kompsat 2. More...
  • Arirang South Korean civilian surveillance satellite. Study 2015. South Korean indigenously-designed, multipurpose 1500 kg sun-synchronous orbit satellite, to be lofted by KSLV-III by 2015. More...

See also
  • Agency Agencies or institutions overseeing design, development, construction, or operation of space-related systems. More...

Associated Launch Vehicles
  • KSR South Korean indigenous sounding and test rocket family, using solid rocket motors and a test vehicle with a liquid oxygen/kerosene motor. Further development of the latter into the KSLV satellite launch vehicle was abandoned in 2005 in favor of licensed Russian technology. More...
  • KSR-I First South Korean sounding rocket, an unguided single solid propellant stage vehicle. Development began in 1990 and the rocket was flown two times in 1993. More...
  • KSR-II Two-stage South Korean sounding rocket, using two of the solid rocket motors developed for the KSR-I in tandem. Flown twice in 1997-1998. More...
  • KSR-III South Korean sounding rocket. Test bed for development of an orbital launch vehicle, powered by the liquid oxygen/kerosene engine planned for the KSLV-I. However flown only once in 2002. More...
  • KSLV-I 2002 South Korean orbital launch vehicle. In 2002 South Korea announced it was planning to develop a small satellite launch vehicle by 2005, based on technology flown on the KSR-III test vehicle. By 2005 this was replaced by a completely different design, based on the Russian Angara space booster. More...
  • KSLV-I In 2005 it was announced that the KSLV-I would not fly until 2007. It was now a completely different vehicle, consisting of a first stage derived from the Russian Angara launch vehicle, and a solid propellant second stage of South Korean manufacture. First launch 2009.08.25. More...
  • KSLV South Korean launch vehicle family. Originally they were to be of completely indigenous design; but in 2005 it was announced that they would use the (in-development, unflown) Russian Angara booster module as the basis. The program, like that of the Angara, was subject to continuous funding shortages and schedule delays. In 2008 the Angara alternate was cancelled after Russia refused to transfer essential technologies and the total cost had increased from US$ 240 million to US$ 350 million. The Korean government went 'back to the drawing board'. More...
  • KSLV-III South Korean launch vehicle, to consist of a Russian Angara first stage, a South Korean liquid propellant second stage, and a South Korean solid propellant apogee kick motor. Scheduled for first flight by 2015. In August 2006 the Korean press reported that the first and second stages would both be Angara-UM modules... how this configuration would work (stacked versus parallel) was unclear. More...
  • KSLV-II South Korean launch vehicle, originally scheduled for first flight by 2010. Evidently it would have consisted of a Russian Angara first stage and a South Korean liquid-propellant second stage. In August 2006 it was reported in the Korean press that this launcher configuration was cancelled. More...

Associated Launch Sites
  • Anhueng South Korean sounding rocket launch site, used from June 1993, known to have been used for 5 launches from 1993 to 2002, reaching up to 150 kilometers altitude. More...
  • Goheung South Korean space center, built on Woenaro Island, off the Goheung peninsula, at the southern end of the Korean peninsula. The space center would be built in four phases through 2015 on a 4.95 million square meter landfill on the shore of the island. More...

KARI Chronology


1993 June 4 - . Launch Site: Anhueng. LV Family: KSR. Launch Vehicle: KSR-I. LV Configuration: KSR-I-1.
  • Ozone profile mission - . Nation: Korea South. Agency: KARI. Apogee: 39 km (24 mi). Summary: Ultraviolet radiometer to measure vertical ozone distribution in the stratosphere over the Korean peninsula. Rocket performance also monitored..

1993 September 1 - . Launch Site: Anhueng. LV Family: KSR. Launch Vehicle: KSR-I. LV Configuration: KSR-I-2.
  • Ozone profile mission - . Nation: Korea South. Agency: KARI. Apogee: 49 km (30 mi). Summary: Ultraviolet radiometer to measure vertical ozone distribution in the stratosphere over the Korean peninsula. Rocket performance also monitored..

1997 July 9 - . Launch Site: Anhueng. LV Family: KSR. Launch Vehicle: KSR-II. LV Configuration: KSR-II-1.
  • X-ray astronomy / ionosphere mission - . Nation: Korea South. Agency: KARI. Apogee: 150 km (90 mi). Summary: Measured the vertical distribution of ozone using an ultraviolet radiometer..

1998 June 11 - . 01:00 GMT - . Launch Site: Anhueng. LV Family: KSR. Launch Vehicle: KSR-II. LV Configuration: KSR-II-2.
  • X-ray astronomy / ionosphere mission - . Nation: Korea South. Agency: KARI. Apogee: 137 km (85 mi). Summary: Measured the vertical distribution of ozone using an ultraviolet radiometer..

1999 December 21 - . 07:13 GMT - . Launch Site: Vandenberg. Launch Complex: Vandenberg 576E. LV Family: Pegasus. Launch Vehicle: Taurus 2110. LV Configuration: Taurus 2110 T4.
  • Kompsat - . Payload: Arirang. Mass: 470 kg (1,030 lb). Nation: Korea South. Agency: KARI. Manufacturer: KAIST. Class: Earth. Type: Sea satellite. Spacecraft: KOMPSAT. USAF Sat Cat: 26032 . COSPAR: 1999-070A. Apogee: 677 km (420 mi). Perigee: 670 km (410 mi). Inclination: 97.8000 deg. Period: 98.20 min. Korean Multipurpose Satellite; carried an ocean color sensor developed by TRW and particle detectors. KOMPSAT was built by the Korean Aerospace Research Institute (KARI) based on a test model built by TRW; it used the TRW STEP Lightsat bus and had a mass of around 500 kg, with 73 kg of hydrazine fuel.

2002 November 28 - . 05:52 GMT - . Launch Site: Anhueng. LV Family: KSR. Launch Vehicle: KSR-III. LV Configuration: KSR-I-1.
  • KSR-III Launch Vehicle Technology Test / Aeronomy mission - . Nation: Korea South. Agency: KARI. Apogee: 43 km (26 mi). The rocket reached 42 km altitude and a speed of 902 meters per second. It impacted in the West Sea 85 km from the coastal launch site, 231 seconds after launch. In preparation for the launch, KARI and related agencies successfully carried out ignition tests in May and August.

2006 July 28 - . 07:05 GMT - . Launch Site: Plesetsk. Launch Complex: Plesetsk LC133/3. LV Family: UR-100N. Launch Vehicle: Rokot. LV Configuration: Rokot s/n 9.
  • Kompsat 2 - . Payload: Arirang-2. Mass: 798 kg (1,759 lb). Nation: Korea South. Agency: KARI. Manufacturer: EADS Astrium. Class: Communications. Type: Civilian communications satellite. Spacecraft: KOMPSAT-2. USAF Sat Cat: 29268 . COSPAR: 2006-031A. Apogee: 701 km (435 mi). Perigee: 676 km (420 mi). Inclination: 98.1000 deg. Period: 98.50 min. Summary: Carried a 1-meter-resolution Earth surveillance camera...

2009 August 25 - . 08:00 GMT - . Launch Site: Goheung. LV Family: KSLV. Launch Vehicle: KSLV-I. LV Configuration: Naro KSLV-1. FAILURE: First and second stages operated correctly, but half of payload fairing failed to separate. Extra mass prevented the second stage and payload from reaching orbital velocity, and the satellite reentered over New Guinea..
2010 June 10 - . 18:01 GMT - . Launch Site: Goheung. LV Family: KSLV. Launch Vehicle: KSLV-I. LV Configuration: Naro-1. FAILURE: First stage failure..
  • STSAT-2B - . Mass: 99 kg (218 lb). Nation: Korea South. Agency: KARI. Class: Technology. Type: Technology satellite. Spacecraft: STSAT. Summary: Science and Technology Satellite with Lyman-alpha imaging solar telescope and laser altimeter..

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