Encyclopedia Astronautica
Titan Centaur 401B


Version of Titan 4B with Centaur T upper stage.

Failures: 1. First Fail Date: 1998-08-12. Last Fail Date: 1998-08-12. LEO Payload: 9,000 kg (19,800 lb). Payload: 9,000 kg (19,800 lb) to a GTO. Failures: 1. First Fail Date: 1999-04-30. Last Fail Date: 1999-04-30.

Gross mass: 939,000 kg (2,070,000 lb).
Payload: 9,000 kg (19,800 lb).
Height: 62.20 m (204.00 ft).
Diameter: 3.05 m (10.00 ft).
Thrust: 15,000.00 kN (3,372,000 lbf).
Apogee: 400,000 km (240,000 mi).
First Launch: 1997.10.15.
Last Launch: 2003.09.09.
Number: 7 .

More... - Chronology...


Associated Countries
Associated Spacecraft
  • Milstar American military communications satellite. 6 launches, 1994.02.07 (USA 99) to 2003.04.08 (USA 169). Milstar was a series of advanced US military communications satellites designed to provide global jam-resistant communications for military users. More...
  • Milstar American military communications satellite. 6 launches, 1994.02.07 (USA 99) to 2003.04.08 (USA 169). Milstar was a series of advanced US military communications satellites designed to provide global jam-resistant communications for military users. More...
  • Advanced Orion American military naval signals intelligence and reconnaisance satellite. Highly classified, operational, first launch 1995.05.14. More...
  • Advanced Orion American military naval signals intelligence and reconnaisance satellite. Highly classified, operational, first launch 1995.05.14. More...
  • Cassini American outer planets probe. 2 launches, 1997.10.15 (Cassini) and (Huygens). The Cassini spacecraft was a scientific platform designed to perform an in-depth study of the Saturnian system. More...
  • Huygens European outer planets probe. One launch, 1997.10.15. Titan landing probe; attached to Cassini spacecraft. More...
  • Cassini American outer planets probe. 2 launches, 1997.10.15 (Cassini) and (Huygens). The Cassini spacecraft was a scientific platform designed to perform an in-depth study of the Saturnian system. More...
  • Huygens European outer planets probe. One launch, 1997.10.15. Titan landing probe; attached to Cassini spacecraft. More...

See also
  • Titan The Titan launch vehicle family was developed by the United States Air Force to meet its medium lift requirements in the 1960's. The designs finally put into production were derived from the Titan II ICBM. Titan outlived the competing NASA Saturn I launch vehicle and the Space Shuttle for military launches. It was finally replaced by the USAF's EELV boosters, the Atlas V and Delta IV. Although conceived as a low-cost, quick-reaction system, Titan was not successful as a commercial launch vehicle. Air Force requirements growth over the years drove its costs up - the Ariane using similar technology provided lower-cost access to space. More...
  • Titan The Titan launch vehicle family was developed by the United States Air Force to meet its medium lift requirements in the 1960's. The designs finally put into production were derived from the Titan II ICBM. Titan outlived the competing NASA Saturn I launch vehicle and the Space Shuttle for military launches. It was finally replaced by the USAF's EELV boosters, the Atlas V and Delta IV. Although conceived as a low-cost, quick-reaction system, Titan was not successful as a commercial launch vehicle. Air Force requirements growth over the years drove its costs up - the Ariane using similar technology provided lower-cost access to space. More...

Associated Manufacturers and Agencies
  • Martin American manufacturer of rockets, spacecraft, and rocket engines. Martin Marietta Astronautics Group (1956), Denver, CO, USA. More...
  • Martin American manufacturer of rockets, spacecraft, and rocket engines. Martin Marietta Astronautics Group (1956), Denver, CO, USA. More...

Associated Launch Sites
  • Cape Canaveral America's largest launch center, used for all manned launches. Today only six of the 40 launch complexes built here remain in use. Located at or near Cape Canaveral are the Kennedy Space Center on Merritt Island, used by NASA for Saturn V and Space Shuttle launches; Patrick AFB on Cape Canaveral itself, operated the US Department of Defense and handling most other launches; the commercial Spaceport Florida; the air-launched launch vehicle and missile Drop Zone off Mayport, Florida, located at 29.00 N 79.00 W, and an offshore submarine-launched ballistic missile launch area. All of these take advantage of the extensive down-range tracking facilities that once extended from the Cape, through the Caribbean, South Atlantic, and to South Africa and the Indian Ocean. More...
  • Cape Canaveral America's largest launch center, used for all manned launches. Today only six of the 40 launch complexes built here remain in use. Located at or near Cape Canaveral are the Kennedy Space Center on Merritt Island, used by NASA for Saturn V and Space Shuttle launches; Patrick AFB on Cape Canaveral itself, operated the US Department of Defense and handling most other launches; the commercial Spaceport Florida; the air-launched launch vehicle and missile Drop Zone off Mayport, Florida, located at 29.00 N 79.00 W, and an offshore submarine-launched ballistic missile launch area. All of these take advantage of the extensive down-range tracking facilities that once extended from the Cape, through the Caribbean, South Atlantic, and to South Africa and the Indian Ocean. More...
  • Cape Canaveral LC40 Titan launch complex. Constructed as part of the Titan Integrate-Transfer-Launch (ITL) facility at the north end of Cape Canaveral in the early 1960s. Supported a wide variety of military space missions involving Titan IIIC, Titan 34D and Titan IV vehicles. More...

Associated Stages
  • Centaur G Lox/LH2 propellant rocket stage. Loaded/empty mass 23,880/2,775 kg. Thrust 146.80 kN. Vacuum specific impulse 444 seconds. Centaur for Titan 4 More...
  • Centaur G Lox/LH2 propellant rocket stage. Loaded/empty mass 23,880/2,775 kg. Thrust 146.80 kN. Vacuum specific impulse 444 seconds. Centaur for Titan 4 More...
  • Titan 4-2 N2O4/Aerozine-50 propellant rocket stage. Loaded/empty mass 39,500/4,500 kg. Thrust 459.51 kN. Vacuum specific impulse 316 seconds. More...
  • Titan USRM Solid propellant rocket stage. Loaded/empty mass 357,239/52,040 kg. Thrust 7,560.68 kN. Vacuum specific impulse 286 seconds. More...
  • Titan 4-2 N2O4/Aerozine-50 propellant rocket stage. Loaded/empty mass 39,500/4,500 kg. Thrust 459.51 kN. Vacuum specific impulse 316 seconds. More...
  • Titan 4-1 N2O4/Aerozine-50 propellant rocket stage. Loaded/empty mass 163,000/8,000 kg. Thrust 2,428.31 kN. Vacuum specific impulse 302 seconds. More...
  • Titan USRM Solid propellant rocket stage. Loaded/empty mass 357,239/52,040 kg. Thrust 7,560.68 kN. Vacuum specific impulse 286 seconds. More...
  • Titan 4-1 N2O4/Aerozine-50 propellant rocket stage. Loaded/empty mass 163,000/8,000 kg. Thrust 2,428.31 kN. Vacuum specific impulse 302 seconds. More...

Titan Centaur 401B Chronology


1997 October 15 - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC40. LV Family: Titan. Launch Vehicle: Titan Centaur 401B. LV Configuration: Titan 401B B-33 /Centaur (45E-13).
  • Cassini - . Nation: USA. Agency: NASA. Manufacturer: JPL. Class: Outer planets. Type: Outer planets probe. Spacecraft: Cassini. USAF Sat Cat: 25008 . COSPAR: 1997-061A. Summary: En route Venus.
  • Huygens - . Nation: Europe. Agency: NASA. Spacecraft: Cassini. USAF Sat Cat: 25008 . COSPAR: 1997-061xx.

1998 May 9 - . 01:38 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC40. LV Family: Titan. Launch Vehicle: Titan Centaur 401B. LV Configuration: Titan 401B/Centaur 4B-25/TC-18 (K-25).
  • USA 139 - . Payload: Advanced Orion 2. Nation: USA. Agency: NRO; NSA. Manufacturer: El Segundo. Class: Military. Type: Military naval signals reconnaisance satellite. Spacecraft: Advanced Orion. USAF Sat Cat: 25336 . COSPAR: 1998-029A. Apogee: 35,800 km (22,200 mi). Perigee: 35,780 km (22,230 mi). Inclination: 0.0000 deg.

1999 April 30 - . 16:30 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC40. LV Family: Titan. Launch Vehicle: Titan Centaur 401B. LV Configuration: Titan 401B/Centaur 4B-32/TC-14 (K-26). FAILURE: Centaur software programming error.. Failed Stage: 3.
  • USA 143 - . Payload: Milstar-2 F1 / DFS 3. Nation: USA. Agency: USAF. Manufacturer: Lockheed. Class: Communications. Type: Military communications satellite. Spacecraft: Milstar. USAF Sat Cat: 25724 . COSPAR: 1999-023A. Apogee: 5,149 km (3,199 mi). Perigee: 1,097 km (681 mi). Inclination: 28.2000 deg. The Titan core vehicle operated correctly, but a software error in the Centaur stage resulted in all three planned burns being made at the wrong times, during the first orbit instead of over a six hour period. The three burns planned to place Milstar successively in a 170 x 190 km parking orbit, a geostationary transfer orbit, and finally geosynchronous orbit. Instead, at 19:00 GMT, several hours before the scheduled third burn, Milstar separated into a useless 740 km x 5000 km orbit. Milstar-2 F1 was the first upgraded Milstar with an extra Medium Data Rate payload with a higher throughput. The payload included EHF (44 GHz), SHF (20 GHz) and UHF communications transponders and satellite-to-satellite crosslinks, with narrow beams to avoid jamming.

2001 February 27 - . 21:20 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC40. Launch Pad: SLC40. LV Family: Titan. Launch Vehicle: Titan Centaur 401B. LV Configuration: Titan 401B/Centaur 4B-41/TC-22 (K-30).
  • USA 157 - . Payload: Milstar-2 DFS 4. Mass: 4,670 kg (10,290 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: USAF. Manufacturer: Lockheed. Class: Communications. Type: Military communications satellite. Spacecraft: Milstar. USAF Sat Cat: 26715 . COSPAR: 2001-009A. Apogee: 35,768 km (22,225 mi). Perigee: 35,764 km (22,222 mi). Inclination: 4.5000 deg. Period: 1,435.05 min. Military Communications satellite. Launch delayed from October 30, December 14, 2000, and February 2 and February 24, 2001. The Milstar DFS 4 satellite (the second Milstar Block 2) provided secure communications for the US Department of Defense, with UHF, EHF and SHF band transmitters. Titan 4B-41 with core stage K-30 took off from Cape Canaveral and placed Milstar and the Centaur TC-22 upper stage in a suborbital trajectory. TC-22 then ignited to enter a 200 km parking orbit, and after two more burns delivered Milstar to geosynchronous drift orbit. Small engines on board the Milstar placed it at its targeted geostationary position. USA 157, a 4.5 tonne spacecraft, was the first in the Milstar 2 series which was capable of higher data rates and was more secure against disabling efforts.

2002 January 16 - . 00:30 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC40. Launch Pad: SLC40. LV Family: Titan. Launch Vehicle: Titan Centaur 401B. LV Configuration: Titan 401B/Centaur 4B-38/TC-19.
  • USA 164 - . Payload: Milstar 2-F3 / Milstar FLT-5 / DFS-5. Mass: 4,550 kg (10,030 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: USAF. Manufacturer: Lockheed. Class: Communications. Type: Military communications satellite. Spacecraft: Milstar. USAF Sat Cat: 27168 . COSPAR: 2002-001A. Apogee: 35,800 km (22,200 mi). Perigee: 35,773 km (22,228 mi). Inclination: 1.4600 deg. Period: 1,436.12 min. Military Communications satellite. Launch delayed from December 2001. The Titan core stage shut down 9 min after launch on a suborbital trajectory, and separated from the upper stage, Centaur TC-19. TC-19 made three burns to parking orbit, geostationary transfer orbit, and finally geostationary orbit. It then released Milstar Flt-5. Milstar provided secure communications in the EHF, SHF and UHF bands and would be stationed over European longitudes. As of 2007 Feb 16 located at 29.98E drifting at 0.014W degrees per day.

2003 April 8 - . 13:43 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC40. Launch Pad: SLC40. LV Family: Titan. Launch Vehicle: Titan Centaur 401B. LV Configuration: Titan 401B/Centaur 4B-35/TC-23.
  • USA 169 - . Payload: Milstar 6 / Milstar 2-F4. Mass: 4,500 kg (9,900 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: USAF. Manufacturer: Lockheed. Class: Communications. Type: Military communications satellite. Spacecraft: Milstar. USAF Sat Cat: 27711 . COSPAR: 2003-012A. Apogee: 35,811 km (22,251 mi). Perigee: 35,762 km (22,221 mi). Inclination: 0.9100 deg. Period: 1,436.13 min. Summary: Delayed from November 4, 2002, and January 21, February 2 and 4, March 5, 8 and 21, and April 6, 2003. As of 2007 Feb 4 located at 89.84W drifting at 0.014W degrees per day..

2003 September 9 - . 04:29 GMT - . Launch Site: Cape Canaveral. Launch Complex: Cape Canaveral LC40. Launch Pad: SLC40. LV Family: Titan. Launch Vehicle: Titan Centaur 401B. LV Configuration: Titan 401B/Centaur 4B-36/TC-20.
  • USA 171 - . Payload: NROL-19. Mass: 5,200 kg (11,400 lb). Nation: USA. Agency: NRO. Class: Military. Type: Military naval signals reconnaisance satellite. Spacecraft: Advanced Orion. USAF Sat Cat: 27937 . COSPAR: 2003-041A. American signals intelligence satellite placed into geostationary orbit. It was believed the payload was a successor to the USA-110 and USA-139 satellites launched in May 1995 and May 1998, referred to as 'Advanced ORION' by those not in the know. They were thought to be successors to the RHYOLITE missions of the 1970s. The satellite was originally to have launched April 28, 2002. Launch delayed seven times.

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